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  1. This is a story of an interesting coincidence. The other day we were discussing World War II. In the bitter struggle of 1914-18 and in wars long before that, the men of Bedlington did their part in the bitter battles. To see if we could find anything which might throw some light on this reference to the wars beyond 1914-18, I looked into the groups records and there was the interesting coincidence facing me - an account of four soldier sons of Mr. Will Corby, a sexton, of Bedlington. Anyone related to this family ? Just thought the forum members would find this interesting and post it. All four sons, Thomas, George, Robert and William, served with the Duke of Wellington's forces which fought the army of Napoleon in the Peninsular War (1808-1814) A member of the gallant 42nd, or Highland Watch, Thomas was with Sir John Moore in the celebrated retreat of Corunna, but was mortally wounded in a later action at Burgos, in Spain. George Corby took part in most of the Spanish campaigns without injury. After peace he went with his regiment to the West Indies, where he remained his appointed time, but on his passage home he fell ill and died. Robert, who was in the 2nd Foot, or Queen's Regiment, also shared in the retreat of Corunna. He held on grimly till Corunna was reached, but at the last stage of that terrible night march from Lugo proved more than he, and many others, could stand. A severe storm of wind and rain, mixed with sleet, burst upon the troops, and it was stated that Robert died from sheer fatigue. As a result of his health failing, William was discharged from the Army, so that he was the only one of these four Bedlington brothers who lived to return to his native heath. On further research we find that Mr. Will Corby had a fifth son, John, who, however, lost a leg in his youth. John was never heard to bemoan the loss of his limb, except on the ground that the misfortune had prevented him joining the Army.
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