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Found 6 results

  1. Sixtownships have the Geordie Dictionary. It is worth reading as when we look how we talk around our area, a lot of the words are used by us. We are certainly not Geordies, but our vocabulary is classed as Pitmatic. I will get it online as Mark types it up. So just hang in there until its complete. A A. A preposition - on. A this side - on this side. A. A verb. Aa wad a thowt se - I would have thought so. AA. Pronoun of the first person. Aa divvin'knaa - I do not know. In local works it is usually spelt aw. AA. All. Thor aa' gyen - They are all gone. l(s aa ower-It's all over. AA. To owe. Aa
  2. This is a story of an interesting coincidence. The other day we were discussing World War II. In the bitter struggle of 1914-18 and in wars long before that, the men of Bedlington did their part in the bitter battles. To see if we could find anything which might throw some light on this reference to the wars beyond 1914-18, I looked into the groups records and there was the interesting coincidence facing me - an account of four soldier sons of Mr. Will Corby, a sexton, of Bedlington. Anyone related to this family ? Just thought the forum members would find this interesting and post it. All fou
  3. Here is a brilliant story for the forum members. Enjoy 137 years ago two young East Northumberland brothers, worried because of the declining number of jobs in the coal mining industry, decided to start a new life in Australia. Nowadays, the journey is comparatively safe and a comfortable one, but not so then. For they set out knowing that they were almost certainly leaving the land of their birth for-ever and heading to a country still largely unknown. Their trip was by sailing ship, horse and cab, train and foot. Diesels buses and cars were still inventions of the future. But they made it. T
  4. Hundreds, maybe thousands of miners, including young boys, have lost their lives while working in the pits, not only in Northumberland, but the whole of the country. Now, painstaking research by the Six Townships Community History Group is helping to keep their memory alive. We are currently putting together accounts of how these miners died in the Bedlingtonshire, Wansbeck, Blyth and Morpeth areas. Tyneside Collieries is online too. Deaths in coal mines were a sad and inevitable part of life in the colliery communities. Mining disasters claimed many lives and these tragic events often m
  5. A reminder for forum users that the Sixtownships website has been updated for June. http://www.sixtownships.org.uk We have updated our archives with letters from soldiers on the front-line during World War One. The letters make fascinating reading and come from the Bedlington, netherton, barrington, tyneside, choppington, alnwick, west sleekburn and other areas. For those interested have a good read, you never know you may have family from the past having wrote letters. Read how the use of gas by the Germans affected our soldiers, how villages were destroyed, acts of bravery, and much more, in
  6. The website has again been updated and this time for the 17th of May. The new story, The Zeppelin Raid on the North East, includes photographs and newspaper reposts with pics. Log onto : http://www.sixtownships.org.uk Here is a little from it. About 8. O' clock the Zeppelin passed over the Choppington district on its way to Bedlington. When first seen it was coming from the coast and seemed to have come up the river. In a few seconds a large crowd ran down near to Mr. McHugh's sale rooms, where the Zeppelin was plainly visible, the noise being like that of a steam thrasher. Just at that point
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