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  1. Canny lass

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      20

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      2,688


  2. Malcolm Robinson

    Malcolm Robinson

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  3. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)
  4. Vic Patterson

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      5

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 23/03/21 in all areas

  1. Here is what I have spent over the last 4 years out of my Members Local Improvement Scheme. It would seem some members haven’t spent their allowance for local projects and our last Bedlington West Ward councillor left over £20K unspent in his, which then disappeared, so it wasn’t available to me to use for local projects when I started! There are a couple of projects included which are actually just outside my ward area and I’ll explain why I agreed to them. First one is the new accessible footpath behind the War Memorial in the Town Centre. I think that one is self-ex
    5 points
  2. Just a quick round up of what's been going on in my Ward over the last month or so........ Didn't want to leave these important projects unfinished! Movie2.mp4
    3 points
  3. Thanks Canny lass. The reason for the videos is that I’m usually accused of being too verbose and you can imagine the reams I would have to write to get all that lot down. One of the accusations levelled at me is that I don’t tell people what’s going on???? Course that probably comes from the politicos who struggle to leap from one paragraph to another and who for decades have never engaged with their communities and it suits their narrative to foster the idea that nothing goes on because Independent councillors can’t get anything done. Well I’m thinking that lot is ce
    3 points
  4. Vegreville is predominately settled with Ukrainian immigrants, mainly farmers, and the pysanka being their traditional way of decorating Easter eggs, the area is well known for its heritage preservation, music, dancing, singing etc and like many other small towns they like to advertise their clams to fame by erecting a large symbol, which also happens to be a wind vane! Grande Cache has a Grande Cache!
    2 points
  5. Tried it tonight and look what I got !!!!!!!! Thank you @Andy Millne
    2 points
  6. @John Fox (foxy) - lets hope Andy's question with McAfee gets you to a solution.🙂 Like Andy my next question (even though I have never used McAfee) would have been on the lines of - 'What 'Settings', if any, are set within the security software' and that would have been followed by - 'Try changing the settings'😏 Can't offer any other help😇
    2 points
  7. On further investigation it looks like they have an issue with the IP address which is shared with other web sites so it's possible there is another objectionable one. I have contacted McAfee for a review/more info.
    2 points
  8. Well, I for one, can't agree with that. I get a greater quantity of intelligible information from your reports than I get from some other sources - the operative word here being 'intelligible'. A (comparitively) short, plain, no nonsense, down-to-earth text that simply tells it like it is, gets more points from me than a long-winded, multi-page report full of tables, figures, and terminology - and I say that as a woman with a master's degree in English.
    2 points
  9. 1. Of which instrument was the sackbut a forerunner? Answer = 2. Which Riviera fishing village was an independent republic from the 15th to the 17th century? Answer = 3. What are young grouse or partridge called? Answer = Cheeper 4. Who invented the steam turbine in 1884? Answer = Charles Parsons 5. What is your philtrum? Answer = 6. Arch, whorl and loops are all part of what? Answer = 7. Which fruit was discovered by Christopher Columbus in Guadeloupe in 1493? Answer =
    1 point
  10. You're welcome, Heather. It filled a few hours of a grey, rainy day for one confined to barracks waiting for the Covid vaccination to come my way. The Trotter's do seem to be an interesting family and I'm posting the entry from Burkes Family Records, compiled in 1897, where you (and anybody else interested in the family) can see the development from Robert, the father of the three Dr Trotter(s). It's Robert who is the subject of the main entry and as spouse names and children's names are entered there are lots of ways forward for research. Burkes records the geneology o
    1 point
  11. Hi again, Heather, I had a look at various documents to see if I could find any son named John for Dr James Trotter. He does not appear to have had a son of this name from either of his marriages. Both wives were called Jane which complicated the matter. I believe John is a brother. John Erskine Mar Trotter, to give him his full title, appears as the five year younger brother of James Trotter, then aged 8, in the Scottish census of 1851. He is the youngest in the family. In 1861, when John EM. Is 11 yo, James has started studying medicine but is still living at home with his pa
    1 point
  12. Anther comment on the Bygone Bedlington group :- Sarah Cochrane My Mam worked as a domestic at the hall. While I was studying A level art she got permission for me to sit in one of the top rooms to draw the view. Whilst looking out at the amazing view from up there I got a birds eye view of patients having a sly cigarette or taking short cuts when they should have been walking full circuits around the hall after a while some grown men started sqealing and pointing to something. I didn't know what all the fuss was about until these said men burst through the door and int
    1 point
  13. Alan suggested that Dr James Trotter had a brother who lived in the Guidepost area. I hadn't heard that but I do know there were several doctors in the family. A short while ago I posted that I'd found, in the 1911 census, one of my relatives working for Dr Robert Samuel Trotter at Brewery house, Front Street Bedlington. I have to report that this wasn't THE Dr Trotter, as later resarch has shown. Dr Trotter of 'monument' fame died in 1899. However, both he(on the 1891 census) and Robert Samuel Trotter (on the 1911 census) lived at the same adress. I'm assuming therefore that the latter i
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. Now, I'm not one for taking credit where credit isn't due BUT did you notice how Andy had fixed it within a few minutes of my advice/suggestion?
    1 point
  16. I usually tried that on a Thursday night after departing the Red Lion about 11.45 pm and sometimes it worked, however Boris stopped all that a few months back so now it's all down to Andy to sort out!
    1 point
  17. A forgot all aboot the 'hoojackapivvy' - divin't tell me kids, they'l think am gannin senial😲
    1 point
  18. Have you tried twiddling the hoojackapivvy on the whotsit? Failing that a good old slap to the thingamyjig might do the trick! No need to thank me lads.
    1 point
  19. Definitely not, Heather! We love any historical challenge! Welcome to the forum. I've had a look at the names but there's nothing that rings any bells except Trotter and that's because of Bedlington's connection with Dr. Trotter. It's an interesting, if gruesome, bit of history though and nothing I've ever heard about. Thanks for sharing it.
    1 point
  20. Answers to last wek's quiz: 1. Boer war 2. Wuthering Heights 3. John Cannon 4. Goldie 5. 15 6. Patella 7. Silicon 8. Zephyr 9. Poliomyelitis 10. Barbara Streisand 11. Yearling 12. Telephone (dog and bone – usually shortened to ‘dog’) New quiz tomorrow!
    1 point
  21. That is my Dad! He is called Ray Chaytor and was gardener/ head gardener there for over 50 years. Badminton was his game, he and my brother Paul were great players in their day.
    1 point
  22. @Jammy - but was the Grey Lady 👤 a physio? A good question that I cannot answer. I don't think any of the female physio's were old enough unless they could change their appearance for daytime use! Residents could leave the hall every evening after tea but had to be back by 9.30. Our choice for brown hydration was Guide Post club on a thursday evening. It was easy to get to using the United bus outside the hall to the doors of the club for opening time at 6.00 with the reverse journey reaching the hall at 9.25 for lights out at 10 if I remember correctly. Everyone went home on a fri
    1 point
  23. Hi @Rigger. I have a photograph of the handwritten inquest report - from memory it’s about four pages and I think William Johnstone’s name is mentioned three times. I am happy to upload the pages here, as they may be of interest to others...it’s local historical stuff, after all. I’ll do this tomorrow. Thanks for your reply.
    1 point
  24. Thanks Alan. Yes, I saw that first time I looked at this forum a year or so ago....and in fact it is the same person. When I looked again at the inquest record, and at the spelling of the name of the landlord - host of the inquest and also on the inquest jury - it’s Johnstone 👍 This is indeed one of the men who judged how little Charles died. Shout out to @Riggerin case he has any family knowledge. A murder inquest, esp for a child killed by his mother, would be a huge event in the village at that time, and likely to be remembered for a while, anyway, even after the death of the nex
    1 point
  25. I Remember Joyce Miller.
    1 point
  26. Britain's first giga plant! https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-56711116
    1 point
  27. 1. Second Boer War 2. Thrushcross Grange, 3. The Cannon family 4. Goldie 5. 22 6. Patella 7. Silicon 8. Zephyr 9. Polio 10. Barbra Streisand 11. Yearling 12. Telephone
    1 point
  28. It looks like they let the sixtownships website domain name expire. I have removed the link and added one to Past Times History Group in its place. Thanks for pointing this out.
    1 point
  29. https://www.facebook.com/321013641645017/videos/594982757700108 https://www.facebook.com/321013641645017/videos/430688474219411 https://www.facebook.com/321013641645017/videos/808093089689613 https://www.facebook.com/321013641645017/videos/344153499769027
    1 point
  30. Answers to last week's quiz: 1. A traditionally decorated Ukrainian Easter egg 2. A bilby 3. Dairy products 4. Peter Carl Fabergé 5. The pagan goddess Eostre 6. Rebirth 7. Burials 8. Germany 9. Rutherford B. Hayes 10. To set a fixed date for Easter 11. No 12. 30 days 13. 2,589 kg (5 lb 11.36 oz) ostrich egg laid in Borlänge, Sweden 17 May 2008. 14. Pancake Day. Mardi Gras and Fat Tuesday are also acceptable 15. Chile 16. April 16 17. Maundy
    1 point
  31. Yes Alan that is how we decorated most of the eggs, hand painting the rest of them. My dad was quite an artist and he would paint pictures mostly the three crosses etc, he even made "Humpty Dumpy" eggs, plastercine limbs and sitting on a match box, my wife won a wrist watch with one at "the Club" or Grapes! These are about 35 years old, and come out each year.
    1 point
  32. Thanks Ovalteeny- I will be in touch via email in a few minutes.- It seems we share similar interests.
    1 point
  33. I have spent quite a bit of time researching Bedlington Mechanics FC, from 1948 and subsequently widened my search to include all the local teams from the Colliery Villages in East Northumberland. I have league table for several years from 1946-1960's for Northern Alliance, Northern Combination and Miners Welfare Leagues. I am happy to pass on the info that I have (albeit incomplete) by way of the spreadsheets that I compiled. If QVC would like to e-mail me on jack261@btinternet.com then I'm happy to expand further and also happy to share the spreadsheets. Ovalteeny
    1 point
  34. Now you have me thinking Vic - how we did our paste eggs? My memory says our mam would boil the ones to be used for japping with the brown outer skins of onions making the egg shell stain a patchy brown. On half of the eggs to be boiled for japping my dad was allowed to put designs on them by using a candle. He would draw out a pattern, with the candle, on the egg shell and the egg would then be wrapped with the onion skins, secured onto the egg with cord/twine, and then the egg boiled. When the onion skins were removed, after boiling, the wax from the candle had protected the
    1 point
  35. 1. Ukrainian Easter egg 2. The Easter Bilby 3. Dairy products 4. Peter Carl Fabergé's 5. Pre-Christian goddess in England, Eostre, who was celebrated at beginning of spring. 6. Fertility and rebirth, Easter eggs symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus, from which Jesus resurrected. 7. Queen Elizabeth I 8. Germany 9. President Hayes 10. Establish Easter Sunday as the Sunday following the second Saturday in April 11. No 12. 40 days 13. 16 oz 14.
    1 point
  36. Confused, Vic? What I'm trying to say is that "sack" has never meant wine. In more modern day parlance, wine is a noun and sack is the adjective that describes the wine as being dry. The modern day name would therefore be HONEY DRY FARM. This just doesn't sound right for a farm name. Mind you, neither does Honey Sack Farm. I'm hoping John can let us see the original of those three handwritten words.
    1 point
  37. Here it is - the Easter special with lots of easter related questions, a few extra and a special bonus question. Happy Easter to everyone: 1. What is pysanka? 2. What do Australians use to symbolize Easter instead of a rabbit? 3. According to tradition, Hot Cross Buns are made without which ingredient? 4. Who was the jeweler famous for making ornate Easter eggs for the Russian royal family? 5. From what does Easter get its name? 6. What is the Easter egg supposed to symbolize? 7. In 1592 a British monar
    1 point
  38. I think mine was too! However, i did get to taste a Thorntons egg ( a very small piece of) a couple of times in my childhood. My sister worked for Berthe Burns in her 'Tea Rooms in Morpeth and Bertha was very generous at Xmas and Easter when her employees recieved a small box of chocolates (Xmas) or a chocolate egg (Easter) - always from Thorntons.
    1 point
  39. It was the old hut used to store tools etc for the cemetery staff. The Friends group needed a base and that seemed ideal. I have another possible use for it too..........a man shed to help with mental health issues. If we can get some people interested in using it as a meeting place then doing a bit of gardening in the cemetery it would help in many ways! The Yurt in Leading Link can be used in the same way.
    1 point
  40. Not a problem! I do like a challenge and linguistics can be used to solve many historical conundrums. PS gardening questions are also welcome!
    1 point
  41. I had another look at this, but from a linguistic point of view. The English language has changed a great deal since 1739 so I was looking for similarities or changes in spelling that might have occurred. I didn't find any and the word forms have existed as written for several centuries prior to 1739. I did see one thing that got me thinking though. I know from my own experience that old handwriting can be difficult to decipher. As I mentioned above, some letters can easily be confused. Something I do is to look at the shape of words as well as the orthographic construction. Words have d
    1 point
  42. Thanks Eggy! I've had another look at the death certificate after reading your reply and I think it is only one word 'Chargeman' but the handstyle isn't the best so I can't be certain. Myself, I was wondering if "charge" could be anything to do with explosives.
    1 point
  43. Don't thank me Vic! Thank the corona viruset that's forcing me (and many others) to find ways of keeping track of the days, weeks and months when the usual landmarks have been obliviated by restrictions. The usual group activities that divided up my week: water aerobics on Tuesdays and Thursdays, Spanish group on Mondays and OAP group on Friday are no longer fixed points. We've had to find other landmarks. For me that's become: Letter writing on Tuesdays (I've adopted two elderly people in residential care and they both get a letter in the post on Wednesday/Thursday). I hope that's a landmark
    1 point
  44. CL - the Durham Mining Museum site has a section - Mining occupations in alphabetical order :- http://www.dmm.org.uk/educate/mineocc.htm What I don't know is if the profession 'Charge Man' refers to the same as 'Chargeman' as list on the DMM. I don't know if there is also a connection to the miner in charge of the 'Shot Box' as shown, and briefly described, in James's photo in the Dr Pit & Roes album. I'm sure @James or @HIGH PIT WILMA will fully ex[plain Chargeman 1894: Person in charge
    1 point
  45. I can't help you there i'm afraid. I've never heard of it. I think it's an odd name - honey and sack are not two words I'd automatically put together. 'Money Sack' might be better. H and M are sometimes hard to distinguish in old handwriting. There's a farm and a place at Stannington called 'Make me rich' and I understand that it's an old name, so Money Sack sounds feasible. I do know that the second Lord of the manor married into a coal-mining family and bought land all over the area which probably included many farms. I have a book somewhere about the Ridley estate. Heaven knows where but I'
    1 point
  46. At the Doctor pit, in the early days, the main winder and the John Pit ventilation fan were driven by steam engines. As with all steam engines, each had a boiler in which coal was burnt to produce the steam to drive the engines and each had a chimney high enough to provide sufficient draft to efficiently burn the coal. The chimney of the main winder was 160 feet high and was demolished in 1921 when an electric winder was installed. I don’t know when the John pit fan was converted to electricity but the chimney was demolished in 1952.
    1 point
  47. A snap shot of what's been happening in the Bedlington West Ward over the last 4 years. This one!.mp4 536174421_Thisone!.mp4
    1 point
  48. A huge thank you from me for all your dedicated work, Malcolm. As you know, I no longer live there but I still take a keen interest in the area that, to a large extent, made me who I am today. It's nice to see that it's in such good hands and that, despite the trials and tribulations which you describe,it is growing and developing along the right lines. Thank you again for all your hard work.
    1 point
  49. I posted these last year: Dark Day for Bedlington.mp3 The Bedlington Murders.doc
    1 point
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