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  1. HIGH PIT WILMA

    HIGH PIT WILMA

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  2. James

    James

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  3. John H Williams

    John H Williams

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  4. Canny lass

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 21/03/21 in all areas

  1. Andy is "Putting" or taking the tub outbye to a landing,where several full tubs would be coupled up,usually a set of six,where a "Driver" with a bigger horse would pull the set outbye from the landing to the shaft bottom,to be sent to Bank in the cages.Andy is going downhill when the pic was taken,as he has a wooden "Dreg" in the rear wheels to help slow the tub from over running the horse,even though the Limbers,["Limma's"] used to control the tub ,also the "Backstrap" on the Horse's Gears,around his rear end and fastened to his Bellyband...that pushed up against the Horse's rear flanks,and w
    2 points
  2. Note their pants!!.."Fustons"...indestructible thick warm material,most Miners wore Fustons,it was like ...what else wud ye wear doon a black hole?...not ya Wedding Suit! See the Steel corrugated Straps,[or "Planks"] holding the roof up? They were 6' long and canny heavy! Aboot three or four years ago,me and LBJ [me wee Lab x Dog],were waaking back from owa the Bomar fields ahent wor hoose,and a got me eye on summick familiar,sticking oot the thick bushes,next ti the Farmer's fence.A howked on and pulled it oot,it was one of these steel straps,bent at right angles,wi the weight of the roof und
    2 points
  3. Aye,James,the metal canister held 5 lbs of Explosive Cartridges,what we ,[the miners] referred to as "Sticks o' Pooda"..[Powder]. That was the Legal limit that a miner was allowed to carry,under the "Mines and Quarries Act 1954"..of course,like any other Industry,rules were made to be broken! Down the Three-Quarter seam,at Bates,in the early 1970's,I used to be hurrying inbye to fire the Solid Drivage Maingate or Tailgate,or Back Drift,[1-in-4 gradient!],carrying a 50 lb Box of Polar Ajax,[33% Nitro-Glycerine..],under one arm,another 50lb Box on the other shoulder,and TWO - 10LB Packs ,one ea
    2 points
  4. The BNA is the British Newspaper Archives. Most old British newspapers have now been put on the internet. You have to pay a subscription fee,then you can research and download anything you want. Yes,I would recommend it. Instead of going to the newspaper offices and going through page after page,you can 'search' for whatever you want,and it will give you the references. I put Edward Cotes into the Newcastle Journal and it came up with his death notice. You can research people,dogs,industry,villages,whatever you want,without leaving your house. I have found a lot of references to Bedlington (th
    2 points
  5. In the confines of a coalface,sometimes you couldn't start with a 6-0' drill straight off,so you had to start with a 3-0' drill,then change to the 6-0' one when you had drilled right in with the shorter one.That's why he has one lying beside him.
    1 point
  6. Noo THAT!..was one hell of a job,doon the pit,the Bulls'sHead..["BULL'SHEED"],Driller was a canny weight,so with a Nine foot drill in,and drilling into solid stone...ye needed arms like Garth,[a pit saying!],that's hoo Dinper has arms like this in the pic!![He is drilling into the Coal Seam on this Pic.]A "fast" [Stuck!] drill has caused many a broken arm or shoulder,when reverse torque spun the machine out of your hands and twisted your arms etc!
    1 point
  7. One of my Neighbours at Hollymount Square,in the early 1950's was a fella called "Aad Singer Dixon" ,and he was one of the Horsekeeper's from the year Dot,they used to say..and this guy looks like him to my mind..I was only three years old when we moved there,but I grew up with the Dixons,until I got Married in 1967,but Singer had sadly Passed away by then. I remember his Grandson Brian visiting every other night,with his Parents,and through the windows at night we used to hear Old Singer shouting ,as he waved his family off for the night ..."Gudneet,see ye thi morn!"..I can hear his voice no
    1 point
  8. Hello again WW! I've had another look at your query and I'm afraid I'm no nearer finding an answer. However, I was able to ascertain that Julia's father - Charles - did not marry twice. Infact, I can't find any record of marriage for him at all. If, as Eggy suggests, Julia's mother is Mary (nee Rump) then it is Mary who has previously been married. At the age of 26, on March 7 1864, Mary married John Farrow at the church of St. Julian in Norwich. They had one child - George Farrow who was baptised 7 October 1866 at Swanton Abbott in Norfolk and therefore probably born the same year.
    1 point
  9. Photo taken by Willie Ward in 1952
    1 point
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