Jump to content

Contributor Leaderboard

  1. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)
  2. James

    James

    Members


    • Points

      24

    • Content Count

      151


  3. Canny lass

    • Points

      22

    • Content Count

      2,798


  4. Andy Millne

    Andy Millne

    Administrators


    • Points

      20

    • Content Count

      3,425


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 24/07/09 in Image Comments

  1. Humford baths. There were no trees at the A pit.
    3 points
  2. Definitely Bedlington east end, just a few doors along from Millne. Feasters were the first outlet for Westridge School uniforms. I'm afraid I can't confirm Bonzo's origins.
    3 points
  3. Must be an early one @Andy Millne - that's the only one Iv'e seen where the chimney from the Water Works still exists when the place was converted to the swimming baths.
    2 points
  4. Taken today 13/6/2021:
    2 points
  5. @Andy MillneDoes your family have any connections with USA? One of the magazines on the stand is The Delineator. This was an American woman’s “Journal of Fashion, Culture and Fine Arts” which was published in New York 1873 – 1930 before merging with Pictorial Review. This may help to date and place the photo. Also, we can read on the window: “ Victor, [FRENCH C]USTARD, [ICE] CREAM” (Text in square brackets is my suggestion). Victor French Custard Ice Cream was, according to Wiki, from a Californian company and anything to do with the company seems now to be very collect
    2 points
  6. This may or may not be Bedlington but there is a suspicion that the dog may be the original "Bonzo"
    2 points
  7. Then & Now (Google Street View 2020)
    2 points
  8. The photo is taken from No 4 Old Colliery Row looking up towards the Black Bull. The gable end behind Mr Hemsted is No 6 Bell’s Place and this can also be seen in the google maps photo looking at the same view about 100 years later. The section of Bell’s Place that was demolished in the late 1940’s ran parallel and behind Old Colliery Row. To the right of the row were the toilets, and gardens. There was gas lighting and a couple of outside taps - no electricity.
    2 points
  9. Andy is "Putting" or taking the tub outbye to a landing,where several full tubs would be coupled up,usually a set of six,where a "Driver" with a bigger horse would pull the set outbye from the landing to the shaft bottom,to be sent to Bank in the cages.Andy is going downhill when the pic was taken,as he has a wooden "Dreg" in the rear wheels to help slow the tub from over running the horse,even though the Limbers,["Limma's"] used to control the tub ,also the "Backstrap" on the Horse's Gears,around his rear end and fastened to his Bellyband...that pushed up against the Horse's rear flanks,and w
    2 points
  10. Note their pants!!.."Fustons"...indestructible thick warm material,most Miners wore Fustons,it was like ...what else wud ye wear doon a black hole?...not ya Wedding Suit! See the Steel corrugated Straps,[or "Planks"] holding the roof up? They were 6' long and canny heavy! Aboot three or four years ago,me and LBJ [me wee Lab x Dog],were waaking back from owa the Bomar fields ahent wor hoose,and a got me eye on summick familiar,sticking oot the thick bushes,next ti the Farmer's fence.A howked on and pulled it oot,it was one of these steel straps,bent at right angles,wi the weight of the roof und
    2 points
  11. Aye,James,the metal canister held 5 lbs of Explosive Cartridges,what we ,[the miners] referred to as "Sticks o' Pooda"..[Powder]. That was the Legal limit that a miner was allowed to carry,under the "Mines and Quarries Act 1954"..of course,like any other Industry,rules were made to be broken! Down the Three-Quarter seam,at Bates,in the early 1970's,I used to be hurrying inbye to fire the Solid Drivage Maingate or Tailgate,or Back Drift,[1-in-4 gradient!],carrying a 50 lb Box of Polar Ajax,[33% Nitro-Glycerine..],under one arm,another 50lb Box on the other shoulder,and TWO - 10LB Packs ,one ea
    2 points
  12. The following is an extract from the book “Leisure and Recreation in a Victorian Mining Community” by Alan Metcalfe ……….. …….”this, is illustrated vividly by the history of the Bedlington hoppings which were held for three days every Whitsuntide from sometime in the seventeenth century.72 The focal point of the three days of festivities was the Front Street and the adjacent side streets. The Hoppings attracted commercial attractions from outside Bedlington. The streets were filled with "numerous swing boats, galloping horses, shooting galleries, cocoa nut stalls, ice creamers, hokeypokeyi
    2 points
  13. The Old Colliery Row, better known as “The Aad Pit Raa” was built in 1840, 15 years before the Dr Pit was opened. According to Stephen Martin’s book it was built by a farming family, The Swann Brothers to rent to miners who were moving into Bedlington to work on collieries that were opening up in the vicinity. The Colliery Row was initially leased then sold in 1892 to the Bedlington Coal Company. The row was demolished along with Bell’s Place in 1950. Hollymount Square was built on this area immediately after the demolition of the rows.
    2 points
  14. Hi Ian. This was taken at The Old Vicarage next to St Cuthberts Church. I am the other person in the photo . Threegee is my father. If my memory is correct your grandparents lived at the top of Attlee bank but @threegee will know best.
    2 points
  15. I was Jammy............🥶
    2 points
  16. 'I think it was @Malcolm Robinson who took the photo without any clothing added' There are no leaves on the trees so he was probably quite cold standing there in the nude with his flasher in his hands!
    2 points
  17. When we were kids we spent hours in the spring catching toads from the 'A' pit pond(s). We didn't do anything with them, we caught them because we could. I remember there was competition to see who could catch the most. We put them back when we were hungry and went home for something to eat. We were never challenged by any blokes for being there. Every year my uncle wanted one in the spring for his greenhouse to catch the slugs that appeared overnight and the odd insect during the day. The toad he got that had fed well over the summer disappeared early winter. It didn't reappear the next
    2 points
  18. Hello Paul! Welcome to the forum. Look at the 1947 map which I posted above a couple of years ago. Howard Row was built in two blocks, with several years inbetween. The first block, the oldest of the Howard pit houses, is nearest the pit head and is where your father was born at nr.7 The numbers ran from 1-22 starting at the pit and going towards the social club. Your family may have lived there quite a while as there is a Lucas family at that address in 1911. I was born in 1947 at the other end of the street but have no memory of how it was because the family was möved to alternative acc
    2 points
  19. @Canny lasson reading this comment again it sounds facetious and possibly even sarcastic. I apologise, this was not my intention; I was ineptly attempting to convey my continuing admiration of your acute scrutiny and attention to detail. I think you are an adept detective of maps and photos, perceptive and precise (hence my reference to Sherlock H) My very best regards Roseanne xx
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. From threegee. "The group of lads with one astride the car could include Philip Joyce, William Scott, and Bob? Mather?, Bill Orange, Billy Elliot - the Bedlington engineering/garages crowd who used to hang out together. Long before my time."
    1 point
  22. I'm having difficulty seeing those two buildings as one and the same church. One is stone built, the other is brick built. The brickbuilt church has corner buttresses. The windows have different sizes and placements. The roof angles are different.
    1 point
  23. Searched the local Facebook groups as there are a few ladies bowls teams photos posted posted. Found one newspaper cutting, Past Times History group, and it could be the same trophy. Newspaper cutting + an image from Andy's photo added.
    1 point
  24. I need to correct my drawing of Front Street east. Thanks to Andy's wonderful photo collection I can now see that the off-licence wasn't situated between Millne's and Molden's as there is no shop between them. I can see now that at one time Feaster's has occupied both sides of the 'arcade' (the Feaster sign covers the whole length of Molden's and Feasters as I remember them). It must have been split into two outlets before my time. After Feaster's comes Carrs, but I've no idea what sort of shop it was. It seems too big for the off-licence. One photo shows Millne's gift shop directly to t
    1 point
  25. I’ve never heard of Bedlington Amateur FC but it’s a great photo with amazing quality. The photo mentions Price’s field at Hollymount and having grown up around Hollymount I looked closely at the photo to see where it was taken and it definitely wasn’t Hollymount. Before Hollymount Square was built there was a field between the Bell’s Place gardens and Hollymount Avenue but not big enough for a football field. At the top right of the team photo you can see the two chimneys of the Doctor Pit so the buildings behind the team are those down Vulcan Place and looking closely through the trees on th
    1 point
  26. Yes, it's next door to the Northumberland Arms. What is now the "Game On" games shop and was a florists for a while.
    1 point
  27. This was after I left Westridge School,Mr Abrahart left the school around 1958[?]..ish,and went to West Moor at Gosforth. A few years ago,not that many!,My Barber was cutting my hair,and as usual,the chat always went around to our days at Westridge,and he told me that Mr Abrahart left the school after a lot of harrassment from the Headmaster,Mr Hemming,who all the pupils I knew,including myself,thought the world of!! When Mr Hemming left,Mr Abrahart came back,so I am wondering if this Photo was taken during his return..which would have been after 1959 at the very least,cos that is when I
    1 point
  28. Postcard and info from Brian Jenkinson :-
    1 point
  29. Shiney Row was numbered the other way; No 1 Shiney Row was nearest Glebe Row and No 49 was nearest the Doctor Pit. After making the Bedlington Miners Picnic in 1960, Ken Russell came back to Bedlington to film some scenes at Bedlington A colliery (The Aad pit) for his 1969 movie “Women in Love”.
    1 point
  30. HPW Before the plant in the photo was built there was an old plant on this site that washed output from the Aad pit. The “new” plant was built on the same site as the old plant and continued to use the same dump. The wash plant in the photo was about 10 year old when the photo was taken but the discard dump as you say had been in use for over 100 years. The difference with the new plant was that it washed coal from both the Doctor Pit and the “A” Pit. In James Tuck’s book he states that this was part of a modernisation plan at the time of nationalisation of the mines in 1947. I’
    1 point
  31. In the confines of a coalface,sometimes you couldn't start with a 6-0' drill straight off,so you had to start with a 3-0' drill,then change to the 6-0' one when you had drilled right in with the shorter one.That's why he has one lying beside him.
    1 point
  32. Hi Alan, thanks for sending this excellent, very rare, piece of historical Mining Memorabilia! I learned how to use the Vicious Sylvester from my first weeks down Seaton Burn Colliery, at the training gallery, underground, in 1959.It was designated specifically, as a pulling device, and lifting anthing with it was strictly forbidden.. well!.. theoretically! Although it was against the law to use it for lifting machinery, etc, what else could you use, if there was nothing else but the Sylvester! So! It was used for lifting, and over the years many lads lost fingers and thumbs at the very least
    1 point
  33. Photo taken by Willie Ward in 1952
    1 point
  34. Dun Cow with the Co-op grocery dept on the right and Marshall’s buildings on the left
    1 point
  35. All of the institute, including the library was situated on the top floor of the building. It was in a small alcove at the end of the institute; not where the arrow is pointing which was a private house. It was not a public library but for members of the institute, i.e. employees of the Doctor pit. The arrow should point to the area on the top floor of the building mid- way between the window to the right of the war memorial and the end of the building adjoining the house.
    1 point
  36. Dr Pit in 1912 with the surface workers posing for the photo. Note the guy on top of the headgear next to the “pulley wheels”. This old winder house was for the steam driven winder and was replaced with the electric winder in 1921. So there was loss in production, the new winder house was built behind the old one and the electric winder commissioned. The pulley ropes from the old winder were then passed through to the new winder to the electric winder and the old winder house with its chimney was demolished. (Information taken from James Tuck’s book “The Collieries of Northumberland”)
    1 point
  37. Dear All, Thanks so much for the updates. The photo with Christina is lovely, I’ve saved it along with some of the other images that have been posted on the website for my family albums. If this was taken in ‘84, then yes, absolutely we must have flown over from Oman to visit Granny and Gramps. I hadn’t physically taken up residence in Newcastle until around ‘86. I was at school at NPS in Jesmond until I was around 9 years old, at which point I was sent to the boarding school my Dad (Roger) and his brothers Michael and Gavin (both sadly deceased now) attended in Pitlochry in Scotland. It
    1 point
  38. Hi threegee, It’s Ian here. Thank you so much for uploading this photo. I think I can just make out my Mum in the background behind Grandad. I’m sorry I haven’t been on here in years. I was grateful that the Sustrans charity commemorated the memory of my Grandad with a statue. I was fortunate enough to attend the unveiling of it several years ago along with some of my family members. I was very grateful that the community not only proposed a memorial to him, but that they also showed up when his statue was officially unveiled. I still have family in Northumberland, so I hope to vis
    1 point
  39. My wife and I were coming through bedlington station yesterday, I knew of course about the of cinema now apartments, we visited dominoes in sixties so had some nice memories. However, it came as a shock to see the old railway tavern gone completely. We spent some lovely times together in the disq as it was known. The Percy arms had good memories too, now a restaurant. Of course the Clayton has gone where we first met. I said to my wife, our history has been taken away. Of course nothing stands still. Rather sad for me though. My family long gone but some lovely memories. Bedlington has certain
    1 point
  40. On the front row - 2nd from the right ( dark jacket and shorts and arms folded) is William Jamieson. Directly behind him is Joe Cotsworth.
    1 point
  41. He used to be called Kitty Brewster by us but his actual name was Roy. He did have a loud/rough voice. I think he talked a lot. He was a mate of Morris Pattie at one time. Possibly because he lived in the same area/street.
    1 point
  42. I still get emails about these, on my old PC, that I hardly ever check. Couldn't remember my password for this site and the PC blocks this forum. After much faffing about I'm back in. Can't believe I didn't recognise Tommy Percy, it was he who gave me lessons all those years ago, I used to go to his house every week and remember his lovely wife bringing tea and biscuits. Nice to see more names added though.
    1 point
  43. 4 Mr Smart Woodwork & Metalwork (Mr Kitson did not join school until 2 years later approx.) 10 Mrs Code (Coad??) 11 Miss Taylor Latin 13 Miss Pollard Religious Education 16 Miss Hope P.E. 17 Mrs Brown School Secretary Miss Elliot Maths
    1 point
  44. She was Miss MacLean when I started there in 1958 but married (McDonald) I think about 18 months later.
    1 point
  45. Hi Alan,lovely to see this [previously unseen by me] pic,which has my lovely Niece,No 14,Elizabeth Bell..["Liz" to all who know her.]..on it.She was,and still is,the most gorgeous personality you could ever wish ti experience if you met her..really lovely...wor Liz! Also great ti see is Gary Usher,who went on to be one of wor "Cross-Marra's",[on thi oncoming shift after wor shift ended],at Bates Pit,in the Three-Quarter seam..not lang afore pit closure in 1986. Gary and his two Marra's,who were freshly-trained for facework,[rookies!]...asked me if we wud pick them up as Cross-Marra's
    1 point
  46. Jimmy Halliday with his family.
    1 point
Hide Adverts


  • Newsletter

    Want to keep up to date with all our latest news and information?
    Sign Up
×
×
  • Create New...