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Showing content with the highest reputation since 16/04/21 in Posts

  1. Aye, I've just got back to being able to access the forum hassle free, thanks to Andy!
    2 points
  2. Once the trees get to a height where they can fall onto the cables, should they be blown down in a storm, it's better to remove them. Large areas of Bedlington could be cut off if that were to happen. It's unsightly, I know, but believe me it's necessary. The cleared area will soon be filled with wild flowers planted by birds. You can help them out in their planting work by throwing out seeds collected from wild flowers when they themselves go to seed. Dumping your garden waste there also helps if it's allowed in the area. I've found that Coltsfoot, Cowslips, Milkweed and Rosebay Willow herb d
    2 points
  3. Vegreville is predominately settled with Ukrainian immigrants, mainly farmers, and the pysanka being their traditional way of decorating Easter eggs, the area is well known for its heritage preservation, music, dancing, singing etc and like many other small towns they like to advertise their clams to fame by erecting a large symbol, which also happens to be a wind vane! Grande Cache has a Grande Cache!
    2 points
  4. I have cleaned up personal info from this topic
    1 point
  5. Oldwulf. I've lived in Bedlington all my life and only came across one Neave family. This is what I know which may or may not be of any use to you. I was an apprentice plumber from 1964 to 1970. One of the qualified tradesman was a Bill(William?) Neave about 24yrs old in 1964 who lived at Stakeford from being young until he moved to Blyth and became one half of Scott and Neave. He was an only child. His parents lived in Stakeford Lane, Stakeford within 100yds of the Half Moon pub. I'm sure his father was from my area. As I said this may not be of any use to your research because
    1 point
  6. On many census returns these are registered as halves- 17, 17½, 18, 18½ etc.. It can be confusing at times.
    1 point
  7. Oldwulf - Rothesay Terrace house numbers are 1 to 117. The top section are houses, 117 to 108, and I think the first three also houses. Those in between were upstairs and downstairs flats with the upstairs flats having the letter A after the number eg. 107 & 107A etc. The only old photo, where the house numbers could be worked, I have seen is an old postcard. There are a few photos of the Bedlington A pit available if you wanted to see them. Rothesay Terrace on the left as you look at this postcard :-
    1 point
  8. Yeeee Haaaa - Canny lass + BH will get out before it gets dark again 1. Which Prussian statesman was known as The Iron Chancellor? Answer = 2. What is the membranous sack which surrounds the heart called? Answer = 3. Which British Prime Minister said “A week is a long time in politics”? Answer = 4. Into which river did the Pied Piper of Hamlin lead the rats? Answer = 5. Which male vocalist of the 60s had number one hits with Yeh Yeh, Get Away and Ballad of Bonnie and Clyde? Answer = 6. In whi
    1 point
  9. Thanks Alan, I hadn't paid attention to which Bedlington Pit he was at but that's interesting information which I will look at again. I have found relatives born at Sleekburn, and family members at Bedlington Station, so it's interesting to see the distinction between Bedlington and Bedlington Station. A few seemed to have moved to Choppington as well so they were scatted about the area, My own great Grandma, while living in Bedlington met and married a man from Seaton Sluice, who worked at New Hartley Pit, and they lived in both of those places. I often wonder how they met. I have attached
    1 point
  10. I had noticed the name Robert Neave in the In Memoriam section. At least from that record it tells you that he worked at the pit at what is now Bedlington Station. You can see from the map above that the area used to be known as Sleekburn (East & West Sleekburn still exist). When Bedlington had a train station built it was at Sleekburn and the people of Bedlington (known locally as The Top End) used to go by horse drawn carriages (from The Market Place) to Bedlington's Station and It is rumoured thatthe area started to be called Bedlington Station. During your delve into the past you
    1 point
  11. @Oldwulf - There is the Durham Mining Museum site that gives info on all the Northumberland and Durham Coal Mines. However the only reference to miners that worked in the mines is the In memoriam section :- Link to the index page to select the mines is :- http://www.dmm.org.uk/colliery/b022.htm
    1 point
  12. @Oldwulf & @Walsham Wonderer the search I did also returned a link to the British Genealogy site :- https://www.british-genealogy.com/forum/threads/21391-Norfolk-Agriculture-Employment-Migration
    1 point
  13. @Oldwulf - This topic raised by @Walsham Wonderer was the first I had heard of Norfolk famers moving North to work in the coal mines. Although there was some local info on the mines and the area put together for Walsham Wonderer I never attempted to search the www for info. Just for fun this evening I put the phrase - Norfolk farm labourers to Northumberland and Durham - into Google and it returned this link to an entry in rootschat site :- https://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=649914.0 There are 5 pages of comments - nothing with specific documents etc. but some inte
    1 point
  14. My Ancestors also moved to Bedlington From Norfolk, One family (Slaughter) moved between 1860 and 1870 and the other one (Neave) moved after the head of house died, his wife (A daughter of the Slaughter family) brought her 8 children there, some of who went straight to work in the Mines. I heard that the Collieries were offering some sort of assisted passage (by Rail) to people in Norfolk (where agricultural workers were being replaced by machines) to the North east where more Miners were needed for the expanding coal industry. I would like to find some evidence of this, but haven't found any
    1 point
  15. Answers to last wek's quiz: 1. Erwin Rommel 2. Latvia 3. Knock, Knock who’s There 4. Boris Karloff 5. Antelope 6. Splinter 7. 3 pennies 8. Scottish National Party 9. Max Planck 10. Jimi Hendrix 11. Per Lindstrand and Steve Fossett 12. Stephen Hendry New quiz tomorrow.
    1 point
  16. 1. Which German General was known as the Desert Fox? Irwin Rommel 2. Of which former Soviet republic is Riga the capital? Latvia 3. What was Mary Hopkins entry in the Eurovision Song Contest in 1970? Those were the days 4. Which actor’s real name was William Pratt? Boris Karloff 5. What sort of creature is a gerenuk? An antelope 6. Which rat t
    1 point
  17. Last time I looked it was Thursday so here are the answers to last week's quiz: 1. Shropshire (or Salop) 2. 4’ 4” 3. 17 4. Matthew 5. The Automobile association 6. Australia 7. Hindi 8. Lizard 9. Jealousy 10. Isaac Newton 11. The Hobbit 12. Fair Isle New quiz tomorrow.
    1 point
  18. Do former miners still get a 'free' coal supply? If they do what's going to happen now that the UK Government has banned the sale of coal to the public?
    1 point
  19. Yes former miners do receive free coal or most likely coke or its equivalent(nuggets). Ex miners who live out in the sticks are the only ones allowed to receive coal. In the towns it must be manufactured nuggets which are burned mainly on Parkray type inset fires/boilers which supply heat to a heating system as well as providing hot water to the taps. For many years the free fuel allowance could be swapped for a one off cash payment. A lot took this option and installed gas central heating. Because ex miners living in the sticks don't have mains gas they were allowed to burn coal. I don
    1 point
  20. Thanks so much Alan for your help👍
    1 point
  21. 1. In which English county is Much Wenlock. Shropshire 2. How wide apart are the ‘tramlines’ in tennis. 35ft 3. How many syllables are there in a haiku. 17 4. Who is the patron saint of tax collectors. Matthew 5. Which organization has the motto ‘Courtesy and Care’.Automobile Association. 6. For which country did David Campese play rugby union. Australia 7. From which language does the word ‘shampoo’ originate. Indian 8. What is a chuckwalla. Lizzard 9. What did Shakespeare des
    1 point
  22. Alan, the main part of that was always earmarked for commercial redevelopment since the days of WDC. I know Banks had wanted to build 300 odd hosues there but that scheme never got off the ground.
    1 point
  23. Answers to last week's quiz: 1. Karaoke 2. Tom the piper’s son 3. Scilly Isles 4. Richard III 5. Roberto Baggio 6. Vodka, orange juice and Galiano 7. Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens 8. 12 9. Diamond 10. Notts County 11. Butterfly 12. Mrs Tiggy-Winkle/ Washerwoman New quiz tomorrow, same time same place.
    1 point
  24. I have been helping the North East War Memorial Project providing research and stories of Soldiers who died in the Great War. The names I listed are the ones I can not positively identify. Unfortunately, we only have an initial to work with which adds to the difficulty. I have tried all the the usual sources. I was aware of the Poppy Map which was a great initiative, but not sure if they have any detail behind the names. I was hoping a family might recognise some of the names.
    1 point
  25. A post about the Bedlington Memorial on the Front Street at Bedlington was posted on the Bygone Bedlington site recently. The North East War Memorial Project (NEWMP) web site has compiled short stories of the soldiers listed on that Memorial however, several soldiers have not yet been identified, these are W Burns, G Crozier, R Hunter, E Martin, A Mitchison, R Peebles, G Peebles, W Sanderson and J Gilby (Gilroy). If anyone has information about these brave soldiers can you please make contact so the NEWMP can complete the stories for this Memorial. Thanks for any help you can provide.
    1 point
  26. 1. Which Japanese word (English spelling please) translates as ‘Empty Orchestra’?karaoke 2. Who could only play one tune – Over The Hills And Far Away?Tom, the Piper's Son 3. Off which group of islands would you find Bishop Rock lighthouse?Isles of Scilly 4. Which English monarch had a horse called White Surrey?King Richard III 5. Who missed the last penalty in the 1994 football World Cup?Roberto Baggio 6. What are the three ingredients of a Harvey Wallbanger cocktail?Vodka, Galliano and orange juice. 7. Whic
    1 point
  27. 👍! All done and dusted and so far no ill effects. This week's quiz: 1. Which Japanese word (English spelling please) translates as ‘Empty Orchestra’? 2. Who could only play one tune – Over The Hills And Far Away? 3. Off which group of islands would you find Bishop Rock lighthouse? 4. Which English monarch had a horse called White Surrey? 5. Who missed the last penalty in the 1994 football World Cup? 6. What are the three ingredients of a Harvey Wallbanger cocktail? 7. Which British architect design
    1 point
  28. 1. Of which instrument was the sackbut a forerunner? Answer = 2. Which Riviera fishing village was an independent republic from the 15th to the 17th century? Answer = 3. What are young grouse or partridge called? Answer = Cheeper 4. Who invented the steam turbine in 1884? Answer = Charles Parsons 5. What is your philtrum? Answer = 6. Arch, whorl and loops are all part of what? Answer = 7. Which fruit was discovered by Christopher Columbus in Guadeloupe in 1493? Answer =
    1 point
  29. You're welcome, Heather. It filled a few hours of a grey, rainy day for one confined to barracks waiting for the Covid vaccination to come my way. The Trotter's do seem to be an interesting family and I'm posting the entry from Burkes Family Records, compiled in 1897, where you (and anybody else interested in the family) can see the development from Robert, the father of the three Dr Trotter(s). It's Robert who is the subject of the main entry and as spouse names and children's names are entered there are lots of ways forward for research. Burkes records the geneology o
    1 point
  30. Hi again, Heather, I had a look at various documents to see if I could find any son named John for Dr James Trotter. He does not appear to have had a son of this name from either of his marriages. Both wives were called Jane which complicated the matter. I believe John is a brother. John Erskine Mar Trotter, to give him his full title, appears as the five year younger brother of James Trotter, then aged 8, in the Scottish census of 1851. He is the youngest in the family. In 1861, when John EM. Is 11 yo, James has started studying medicine but is still living at home with his pa
    1 point
  31. Tried it tonight and look what I got !!!!!!!! Thank you @Andy Millne
    1 point
  32. Anther comment on the Bygone Bedlington group :- Sarah Cochrane My Mam worked as a domestic at the hall. While I was studying A level art she got permission for me to sit in one of the top rooms to draw the view. Whilst looking out at the amazing view from up there I got a birds eye view of patients having a sly cigarette or taking short cuts when they should have been walking full circuits around the hall after a while some grown men started sqealing and pointing to something. I didn't know what all the fuss was about until these said men burst through the door and int
    1 point
  33. He opens it by himself CL, after taking the suet cake from the end section, but he didn't go in for that.
    1 point
  34. Merry Xmas - 2018 - a chimney is cleaned oot :-
    1 point
  35. Scribbleyjack eggs. The name scribbleyjack maybe a local name and I've known it since I understood words. It's easy to understand why its called a scribbleyjack by the patterns on the eggs. I found many nests when I was a youth, sadly there are not many to find now. When farming practices altered and the stubble was ploughed in and sown before winter the birds couldn't glean the stubbles over winter so starved. Many other birds suffered because of the autumn sowing including Linnets and Skylarks.
    0 points
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