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  1. Thank you all ever so much. This information is fabulous to have and it’s great to see where they actually lived.
    2 points
  2. @Canny lass - I have suggested to Lynne she views this topic, and given her a direct link to it. I have also suggested she joins this group and makes the passing of info easier
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  3. I remember it well! me and my brother used to get thruppence each to keep a look out for the colliery 'polis' at Netherton - and an earfull (or worse) from my mother for being anywhere near it.
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  4. Made them this year as well!
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  5. I believe it is at the Beamish museum.
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  6. Answers to the Easter Special: Cortenuova, Italy (but it was made by the company ‘Tosca’) I am the Walrus Peter Carl Fabergé also known as Karl Gustavovich Fabergé Palm Sunday Pontius Pilate Maundy money Monty Python £155 ($218) It was baked in London 1829 then bought at an antiques show in the UK in 2000. The Flying Bells. In remembrance of Jesus’ death the bells fly to the Vatican and are blessed by the Pope. On the way back they collect eggs and chocolate which they drop into the gardens of well-behaved French children on Easter Sunday. Simnel cake Traditionally there are 11 balls representing the12 apostles, minus Judas The blood of Jesus The moon. Easter Sunday is the first Sunday after the first full moon on or after the spring equinox. Benedict Cumberbatch (The Cumberbunny) Crucifixion day Poland Kinder Surprise. Since 2016 the law forbids the use of toys to promote sale of any item high in calories, saturated fats, sugar or sodium. To provide a fixed date for Easter (NB. The law, although passed, is not yet implemented) Yes. 1978 To disguise eventual flaws. Because it’s easier than trying to wallpaper them. Thank you for putting up with it for two years! If we get locked in again, which i suspect is possible, you may have to put up with it again.
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  7. 3 of our children + 1 in-law + 1 grandson + 2 great grandsons present during the game I was watching, and naturally tearing myself away from it to discuss what Pokermon levels and creatures/animals/strange named beasts had been found. The OH didn't help by continually walking in front of me with hot drinks and lumps of her vegan cakes. Naturally I was more interested in Pokermon - watched the last 30mins on the recorded match at lunch time today.
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  8. Eggs and Canny - that arched doorway looks about in the right position for access to the Priest's home; I do recall it being almost opposite to the Police Station 'backyard' entrance. As I said earlier my Dad was friends with the boss Monk and had rented some land from the Church at the end of Catholic Row to erect a garage, this would have been the late 1950s to early 1960s. The bit of land was beyond all the buildings (there appears to be a car park there now according to Google Street View) and was bounded by Catholic Row on one side and a very high sandstone wall at the back … the famous orchard was on the other side of this wall. This garage was a sectional/modular steel frame/asbestos sheet construction that I helped my Dad to erect on the site – asbestos!!!; he bought it via an advert in Exchange and Mart*. Anyway, we would often walk along Catholic Row to the garage to get the car out and would meet the boss Monk; on a couple of occasions I accompanied my ‘old man’ into the Manse when they’d have a dram and I’d be offered a dandelion and burdock drink, so I have a clear memory of this local geography (in addition to orchard commando raids). The Manse was a building behind that one with the door and access was through that building (it was a large hall); I recall the Priest’s house was quite a large, red brick building – quite grand really! Anyway, my clear recollection of Catholic Row was of a dark and gloomy road with the church buildings forming an unbroken row of dirty cement rendered buildings – there was no gap (where the present church is) as this is the place where the ‘old’ church was. I’ve attached a very grainy snip of an aerial photo which, if you squint, you can make out the boss Monk’s house, etc. Obviously, all that original cement render must have been replaced with the pebbledash when the new church was built and the other church buildings renovated. * for our younger viewers the Exchange and Mart was a weekly national for sale listing publication ... a bit like Amazon but with grubby newsprint.
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  9. Sorry! There was another page of notes that I'd missed. All of the above is correct but there is one more Davison family which I think it is Lynnes family living at 29 Old Factory. Father, Robert 27, mother, Annie Jane 25, daughters Lillian and Annie 3 yo and 8 months old. The handwritten census form is available. The area had many name changes over the years and the residents used one system of identifying where they lived while the enumerator used another. Old Factory is the adress given by both the resident and the enumerator. I can say with certainty that the blue 'circle' contains the adresses 1-24 Old Gate Row and 25-32 Old Factory. Following the enumerator's route from Old Factory to his next port of call - Clock House, I'd suggest that the eight dwellings of Old Factory are those which I've marked with a blue dot (sorry if it's confusing with only blue but it seems to be the only colour available today!). These are at the top of the bank leading from the bridge and may be the reason why they are also referred to as Bridge End by residents. If Lynne would like the census form filled in by Lillian and Annie's parents let me know. Perhaps she can send an e-mail adress through you Eggy, or we can message it in two steps, me to you, you to Lynne.
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  10. Bridge End, prior to 1912 called Bridge End House, is the house at the end of the Bridge on the Bebside side of the river seen to the left of the attached photo. In both 1901 and 1911 it housed four families in dwellings, numbered 1 -4 in 1901 and 5-8 in 1911 when the numbers continued on from Clock House. I've never seen the name "Bridge End Cottages" on any map, census or electoral records. There were no rows of any great length in Bebside Furnace. Even the Bebside Furnace rows at the top of the bank only went as far as 42 at most (Brick Row). To live in number 46 of any Row would mean leaving the Furnace area and moving towards Cowpen on Front Row, which had 140 houses. I’ve researched the furnace area well as 70% of my family was living there from the turn of the century through to the 1930s. There are a few Davisons there but no Lilian or Annie. Nearest name match i can find is Julia Ann Davison a 60 yo widow and her children: David Davison 28, Agnes Davison 26, John George Davison 21, and Julia Annie Davison 16. This family lived at Old Gate, Bebside Furnace which later became Doctors Row. If Lynne can give me anymore info I’ll see if I can help her.
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  11. continued: Having read Stockdale's work I now think I, and possibly we, may be confusing the number of Mechanics’ Institutes with the number of Institute buildings because there seems to have only ever been ONE Mechanics Institute in Bedlington. Briefly (by my standards) those points of interest, gleaned from Stockdale. and relating to our discussion, are the following. 1824 Ten Mechanics’ Institutes in England of which eight were in the North East and Durham. Among these, only Alnwick and Newcastle were in Northumberland. 1825 Twelve MIs in the north east, Hexham, Morpeth and Tynemouth Institutes established. 1827, 1829, 1830, 1831 With the exception of one institute 1828, NO MIs were established in the entire North East. This was due to the effects of the depression. This places a large question mark on Evan Martin’s claim of the Ironworks MI being established 1829. 1834 – 1846 Crisis years in the movement. Only 13 new institutes established. 1847 – 1851 Revival of the movement 1847 The location and economic base of MIs was established between 1847 and 1851 1848 Bedlington Mechanics Institute established. Its economic base was Bedlington Iron Works. 1852 – 1873 Government interventions in education are introduced and public libraries opened. This heralds the demise of the movement as its traditional services now have strong competition. 1855 -1862 The North East movement reaches its peak of activity 1874 to 1902 The MI is still facing strong competition for its traditional services of education and libraries, added to which the institutes are now amalgamating with the Working Mens’ Institutes as the social and drinking side of the movement has gained ground, being almost the only function they have left. 1878 Delegates reports on their Institutes to the Northern Union Annual Meeting were said to be of a ”satisfactory nature”. There was no cause for concern for the movement. 1881 Delegates reports, including from Bedlington, were giving more details on membership, activity and finances and concern is expressed that MIs are still extremely dependent on financial support from the upper classes. This dependency continued throughout the remainder of the century. The death of MIs in the North East: The financial support of the upper classes facilitated a lot of rebuilding and refurbishing within the north east movement during the latter years of the nineteenth century, something Stockdale describes as a possible ”mission of responsibility toward educational and social improvement of the working-classes”. (Netherton got a reading room!). However, it didn’t seem to help other than allowing the movement to go out with a whimper rather than a bang. Bedlington Mechanics’ Institute, which had 200 members in 1906 hade NONE in 1907. Like Monty Python’s Norwegian Blue parrot it had ceased to be. It was extinct. It was dead. The movement ended in the north east in 1913. Several establishments retained the name Mechanics’ Institute, or something similar, but they are basically social clubs. Source: http://etheses.dur.ac.uk/5614/1/5614 3030.PDF In light of that I suggest that Bedlington Mechanics’ Institute, established 1848 at Bedlington Ironworks, may have had its origins in the Society for Mutual Improvement at the same place. I don’t know when that was established, possibly 1829, but i’ts well documented that BIW had students from all over Europe. I’d further suggest that the institutes located at Bedlington Station Colliery and Market Place Bedlington were all part of the same ’Bedlington Mechanics’ Institute’ created to provide easier access for people on the Bedlington side of the river.
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  12. Were any of your wife's relatives on the Roll of Honour?
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  13. We did have a bit of a discussion a while ago about 'The Mechanics Institute' in the thread about listing our pubs and clubs ... there may be some crumbs there that'll thicken the mix of this thread. Look here: https://www.bedlington.co.uk/forums/topic/4448-list-of-pubs-and-clubs-bedlington-district/?page=5#:~:text=Clubs - Bedlington District-,List Of Pubs And Clubs - Bedlington District,-Rate this topic As promised in that earlier thread I continue to look for more info on Mechanics Institutes but documents are difficult to find online; they will no doubt exist as ledgers archived somewhere on dusty shelves but haven't yet been digitized for all to see.
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  14. Canny Lass The Bedlington Iron and Engine works operated between 1736 and 1867 and The Doctor Pit operated between 1855 and 1968. Each had their own Mechanics Institute. The Ironworks Mechanics Institute was in the Clock House at Furnace Bank and was opened in 1829 (from Evan Martin’s book on the Ironworks.) The Colliery Mechanics Institute was initially at the Market Place and then moved to what is now the community centre. I don’t know when it opened but it is shown on the 1860 map of Bedlington so it must have been shortly after the colliery started operating
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  15. Eggy It was never known as the Top End Mechanics Institute. It was the Colliery Mechanics Institute, referred to by everyone as “The Chute.” Your map shows its location after it moved from the Market Place. The 1860 map I have attached shows it when it was in the Market Place. We were told that it was situated in the building that later became Peter Bacci’s shop (there was a billiard room at the back of his shop with two billiard tables.) but I have no proof of this although the map indicates that this is where it was sited. You have posted an 1896 map and mine is dated 1860 so it must have moved between those dates.
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  16. Symptoms The full name of the institute was the Bedlington Colliery Mechanics Institute. It was first located in the Market Place (Peter Bacci’s shop) then moved to what is now the community centre. This was the only colliery institute in Bedlington. The other colliery institutes were at Netherton Colliery, Bedlington station, and Barrington (the Glove Factory)
    1 point
  17. @Canny lass - Ingrid replied to your info with :- Ingrid Atkinson Canny lass thank you so much in the 1911 census my great grandparents stated they lived there at least a couple of years previously as they had a daughter born there in 1908, they then moved to Burdon Terrace by 1910 because my great grandfather went to Canada for work in Oct that year and my grandfather was born early 1911.
    1 point
  18. It was indeed at the top end of Bedlington and next door to the presbytery of the Roman Catholic Church. It's an awkward place to research on maps, partly because the area is often divided over two maps and partly because it's had so many name changes over the years. The best map i can find that shows all the buildings together is this one from 1898. The property (or at least part of it) which i've marked in blue has had the following adresses and housed the following occupants (with occupation) on census records from 1891, 1901 and 1911. The first number is the census schedule number (not the house number), should Ingrid wish to do more research. The number in brackets which follows the adress is the number of rooms and seems to suggest that the property has been divided into smaller dwellings at some time. Perhaps Ingrid can recognise a family name. C1891 104, West End, Robert Thompson, gardener (5+ rooms) C1901 54? Rose Villa, Ralph Humble, Market gardener (5+ rooms) C1911 257, Rose Villa (Gardens), David Muirhead, market gardener (4 rooms) 258, Rose Villa Cottages, Alfred Alexander, miner (2 rooms) 259, Rose Villa Cottages, James Homes, miner (2 rooms) 260, Rose Villa Cottges, Catholic Row, James John Middleton, miner (2 rooms) 261, Rose Villa Cottages, West End, Alexander Brown, miner (4 rooms)
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  19. hi my name is jim lofthouse i was born and lived in netherton colliery then westlea i am looking for ivan mcbride i am told he is in a home but i dont know which one can anyone help me find him contact me at jimlofthouse@msn.com thank you
    1 point
  20. James - the one you mention is for the Mechanics Institute and the one PaulJ is after is the Colliery Institute; both are listed at: http://www.newmp.org.uk/index.php The Mechanics is at Beamish as you say but the Colliery one is missing.
    1 point
  21. Most of us will remember the game of 'Pitch & Toss' that was played outside the Miners Institute at the 'A' Pit that is now illegal to play. It is also illegal to play in New Zealand except on ANZAC day :-
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  22. Happy Anzac Day , Lest we forget. (ANZAC cookies by CL)
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  23. The North East War Memorial Project has an entry for the Roll of Honour but no info apart from a couple of old newspaper clippings. This very useful site is searchable: http://www.newmp.org.uk/index.php
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  24. I didn't know of it but thought I had read about here a few years ago.
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  25. Heh heh! Alan,wud be a queer sight seeing unmentionables fleeing through the air,and landing on sumbody's windscreen gaan at sivinty mile an oor!! Hope ye are keeping areet,Cath not grand at aal..me like ye,lossing me legs and struggling ti keep vertical! Cheers Alan,it's Bait-time! Bill.
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  26. 25-4-2022..Frankie,who abandoned his Windy Driller,when thatcher gave the word to switch off and pull out..switched off,and said "and ye can stop theor!" Frankie,a smashing Marra of mine,and me other Marra's,sadly passed away a few years ago,leaving this legacy. R.I.P. Frankie.
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  27. And thank you from me, it's been a very interesting and testing time for most people but your quiz has been a great distraction from covid, and a great learning experience ! I thought I was past that! I hope you have a great summer and enjoy catching up with your friends and family. Thank you.
    1 point
  28. Thank you CL - now enjoy the holiday - light nights - garden and whatever else comes your way during your release from lockdown
    1 point
  29. Canny - you're correct on the location of the boss Monk's digs. I'll post some information and a grainy snap later - after the Toon v Leicester game.
    1 point
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