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Old Photos of Bedlington 2

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Bedlington's airey houses no longer exist. Built between the late 1940's and early 1950's. As far as I know there were only four streets of airey houses built in Bedlington.

Waverley Drive - numbers 43 to 78 airey houses. Numbers 1 to 42 traditional red brick.

Coquetdale Place.

Tosson Close.

Steadlane Square - numbers 1 to 14 and numbers 27 & 28. Numbers 15 to 26 traditional red brick.

The work to demolish the airey houses and rebuild in traditiol brick started c2009.

Project1.png

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On 08/03/2021 at 15:26, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Steadlane Square

 

Should read Steadlands Square.

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Following info on Airey Houses from Wikipedia :- 

 

Airey house

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
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220px-Airey_Houses_Prior_Mede_Harthill_-
 
Airey Houses in Harthill, South Yorkshire, showing the original shiplap panels

An Airey house is a type of prefabricated house built in Great Britain following the Second World War.

220px-Airey_houses%2C_Main_Street%2C_Sic
 
Unrefurbished (left) and refurbished (right) Airey houses in Sicklinghall,North Yorkshire. Note the increased thickness of the insulation and new cladding on the refurbished house.

Designed by Sir Edwin Airey to the Ministry of Works Emergency Factory Made housing programme, it features a frame of prefabricated concrete columns reinforced with tubing recycled from the canvas tilt frames of military trucks. A series of shiplap style concrete panels, tied back to the columns, form the external envelope.

In 1947, the Central Office of Information commissioned a propaganda film, Country Homes. The directoral debut of the later acclaimed documentary maker Paul Dickson, the film promotes the building of Airey houses in rural areas as a solution to the poor condition (due to the 1930s depression followed by wartime neglect) of much of the housing stock outside Britain's conurbations, due to the ease with which the prefabricated sections could be transported to remote locations.

Today the Airey houses are life expired and many are in disrepair. The houses are one of a number of precast concrete systems listed in theHousing Defects Act. This meant that Government help for private owners was available in certain cases. Generally they are not accepted for mortgages unless repaired in accordance with certain prescribed methods. In the mid-2000s, one company began testing a refurbishment programme. Their programme involves replacing the concrete slabs with blocks, covered the blocks with insulation, and then facing the structure with brick. It is hoped this remodel will result in a warmer and more structurally sound house.

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This is a 2021 aerial shot from Google and the marks out where the airey houses were. All the houses are now brick built.

The first 6 houses of Tosson Close were replaced by new builds and renamed as Puddlers Drive.

Numbers 21 and 22 of Coquetdale place were demolished but not rebuilt. 

 

2021.jpg

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On 09/03/2021 at 20:33, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Should read Steadlands Square.

--------------------------------------

Following info on Airey Houses from Wikipedia :- 

 

Airey house

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Jump to navigationJump to search
220px-Airey_Houses_Prior_Mede_Harthill_-
 
Airey Houses in Harthill, South Yorkshire, showing the original shiplap panels

An Airey house is a type of prefabricated house built in Great Britain following the Second World War.

220px-Airey_houses%2C_Main_Street%2C_Sic
 
Unrefurbished (left) and refurbished (right) Airey houses in Sicklinghall,North Yorkshire. Note the increased thickness of the insulation and new cladding on the refurbished house.

Designed by Sir Edwin Airey to the Ministry of Works Emergency Factory Made housing programme, it features a frame of prefabricated concrete columns reinforced with tubing recycled from the canvas tilt frames of military trucks. A series of shiplap style concrete panels, tied back to the columns, form the external envelope.

In 1947, the Central Office of Information commissioned a propaganda film, Country Homes. The directoral debut of the later acclaimed documentary maker Paul Dickson, the film promotes the building of Airey houses in rural areas as a solution to the poor condition (due to the 1930s depression followed by wartime neglect) of much of the housing stock outside Britain's conurbations, due to the ease with which the prefabricated sections could be transported to remote locations.

Today the Airey houses are life expired and many are in disrepair. The houses are one of a number of precast concrete systems listed in theHousing Defects Act. This meant that Government help for private owners was available in certain cases. Generally they are not accepted for mortgages unless repaired in accordance with certain prescribed methods. In the mid-2000s, one company began testing a refurbishment programme. Their programme involves replacing the concrete slabs with blocks, covered the blocks with insulation, and then facing the structure with brick. It is hoped this remodel will result in a warmer and more structurally sound house.

-----------------------------------------------------

This is a 2021 aerial shot from Google and the marks out where the airey houses were. All the houses are now brick built.

The first 6 houses of Tosson Close were replaced by new builds and renamed as Puddlers Drive.

Numbers 21 and 22 of Coquetdale place were demolished but not rebuilt. 

 

2021.jpg

I got the numbering for  No 28 Steadlands Square wrong:). That house should be No 2

2021.jpg

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Google street View images of the rebuilding :-

1704006137_43WaverleyAvenue2009withtext.thumb.jpg.2044690fb5376576d11b3584023e5e11.jpg

587865633_SteadlandsSquarebrickbuiltwithtext.thumb.jpg.252743feab8a62c2ae48d8ba1f393f26.jpg

1938584262_TossonCloseSteadlaneSquareCoquetdalePlaceandWaverleyAvenuewithtext.thumb.jpg.137dc408f9e9cdc1251a7feeb5b8c6df.jpg

1226766556_WaverleyandCoquetdalewithtext.thumb.jpg.f51410eab28d299465264cd27c03682a.jpg

2009 Google street view shows No 72 Waverley Drive would appear to have been bought and converted to traditional brick before the council decided to rebuild the airey houses :-

71525279_72WaverleyDrive.thumb.jpg.a111ba33850df34e1e0d07398db72926.jpg

Info on the Coquetdale Place houses :-   

1818087253_Coquetdalebackandfrontwithtext.thumb.jpg.d7c18f5e146ebaf39da80fed3412a977.jpg

1624063932_RayburnCooker1955.thumb.jpg.a3f28d3ecf4edf17bea82edd8cf506f1.jpg

227806224_DerekDennisAlan1950.thumb.jpg.4d6b7dbca76f72175f767a645b43d9de.jpg

Our family moved into Coquetdale in 1949

 

 

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)
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