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lilbill15
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I've just had alook on Google Earth. Sunniside doesn't exist - only the five house row adjacent to the station house, Station Terrace so that must be what's seen in the photo.  Could the name Sunnyside refer to the general area?

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5 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

Just out of curiosity I had a look at the Choppington Area today, trying to determine where Sunnyside is. I've always thought of Sunnyside as the name of an area rather than the name of a street but it is in fact the name of a street:

 

Choppington 1947 enl..png

Ooh, @Canny lass. @Alan Edgar (Eggy1948), this is just sooo spooky! I have no idea why/where I got the Sunnyside reference from, I don’t know the area and I can only think I must have seen a map somewhere but I’m completely bemused. Thank you so much @Canny lassfor persevering, not just writing it off as addled brain, but I am more than flabbergasted to learn that Sunnyside DID exist, and adjacent to my area of enquiry. Your latest map is the most relevant yet, I’m VERY grateful, thank you very much xx

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22 hours ago, lilbill15 said:

did Cathy Sekker(sic) live there o.u.a.time?  (maybe another delusion of mine?). x

... can't help you there I'm afraid. I've never heard of Cathy Sekker/Secker. I haven't lived in England for almost 34 years.

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Just now, Canny lass said:

... can't help you there I'm afraid. I've never heard of Cathy Sekker/Secker. I haven't lived in England for almost 34 years.

Ooh,  @Canny lass, I’m so disappointed! I had hopes of getting to see your maps, picking your brains. To find you’re no longer local is a great disappointment. Forbye, the last map showing Sunnyside, d’you have a date for that, please? I’ve found nothing current for Northumberland showing that address, I’m totally confused x

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The name Sunnyside is very familiar to me but not from childhood.  I know that it has cropped up here now and then so I did  search. You might like to look at two topics:

Sunnyside Cottages Choppington

Willow Bridge, Choppington

Sunnyside is discussed in both.

Bluebarby, who writes  mentions that row of houses and they were there during his time in Netherton Colliery. Bluebarby and myself are about the same age.

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21 minutes ago, lilbill15 said:

I’m so disappointed! I had hopes of getting to see your maps, picking your brains

All my maps are digital, except for the prints I make from them but you'll need to invest in a computer or even a small tablet to view them. Brains, or what's left of them can always be picked here.

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5 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

That OS map is from 1947.

None of the emojis on this site is relevant; jaw-dropping gob-smacked etc. 

 

6 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

That OS map is from 1947.

I MUST have seen a map from sometime previously which identified Sunnyside. I was born 1957, didn’t arrive in Bedlington until ??63- , BUT, my earlier question about Cathy Secker is relevant because my late Dad pointed out a house at Choppington one day when we were driving past, I understood he knew and had met her professionally (she was already  ‘on the up’), and I’m now wondering if he might have instilled in me the Sunnyside street name?? 

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Herea re two OS maps. The first, from 1866, shows Sunnyside but it seems to be an area name. There are no rows of buildings but maybe a small farm. The second map is from 1898 and there , for the first time, I can see both Station Terrace and Sunnyside. However, the name Sunnyside has moved to the new row of houses.

 

Choppington 1866 enl..png

Choppington 1898 enl..png

It can be that locally the area is still referred to as Sunnyside, so you may well have heard the name used. Have a look at a bus timetable for the area. I've found in my research that many bus-stops tend to keep their old names.

Edited by Canny lass
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5 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

All my maps are digital, except for the prints I make from them but you'll need to invest in a computer or even a small tablet to view them. Brains, or what's left of them can always be picked here.

Most grateful, thank you x 

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26 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

Herea re two OS maps. The first, from 1866, shows Sunnyside but it seems to be an area name. There are no rows of buildings but maybe a small farm. The second map is from 1898 and there , for the first time, I can see both Station Terrace and Sunnyside. However, the name Sunnyside has moved to the new row of houses.

 

Choppington 1866 enl..png

Choppington 1898 enl..png

It can be that locally the area is still referred to as Sunnyside, so you may well have heard the name used. Have a look at a bus timetable for the area. I've found in my research that many bus-stops tend to keep their old names.

@Canny lass, I desperately need an AHA! emoji, you’re better than Poirot/Marple at investigation and production of evidence! 
If I did invest in a tablet I’m presuming I would need a printer as well in order to comfortably compare/overlay maps? Btw, are you still within UK or much further afield? X

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No @Canny lass, just checked Arriva bus route, only Swan Choppington indicated. However, I am aware of loads of old areas/farms etc being incorporated into street/estate names: and you have quoted examples of the evolution of place names over time- “ nothing stays the same “, or even “things change “. x

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1 hour ago, Canny lass said:

Bluebarby? I can find the name on the members list of Bedlingtoncouk, but subject searches are coming up blank, will persevere with alternate subject titles. Apropos of nothing at all, your 1947 map indicates “puce bush”, NW corner- wondering whether that has become a street name since then? Being facetious 🙄?xx

 

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16 hours ago, lilbill15 said:

If I did invest in a tablet I’m presuming I would need a printer as well in order to comfortably compare/overlay maps? Btw, are you still within UK or much further afield?

... or you could go to the library. Usually you can connect your device or a USB memory stick and print there. Not in the UK but visit when I gat the chance. Living in Sweden.

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4 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

... or you could go to the library. Usually you can connect your device or a USB memory stick and print there. Not in the UK but visit when I gat the chance. Living in Sweden.

Like AND thanks emoji applied, many thanks @Canny lass, also picked up info re Bedlington historical group from Eggy and have emailed John Riley about that so tiny steps being made in building information about Bedlington and how to increase knowledge of the area. I’ll follow up on the library (if it’s reopened yet), and tekaluk at tablets. Thank you very much xx

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16 hours ago, lilbill15 said:

Apropos of nothing at all, your 1947 map indicates “puce bush”, NW corner- wondering whether that has become a street name since then?

Puce Bush goes back to 1865 on maps, with the exception of OS 1966 - 1972 (can't be more speciic) where it is written "Pace Bush". I don't know if it's the same place sometimes referred to as Pease Bush. Puce Bush is in itself quite an interesting name.

Bush, as we understand it today, has its roots (pardon the pun) in the northern Germanic languages but one theory is that they were influenced by the old French word 'bois' meaning woods/thicket/ forest. This was the original meaning of the word even in English but it has evolved to refer to only one particular form of plant.

Puce, as you probably know, is a purplish brown  colour but do you know where that colour gets its name from? The word puce came into the English language quite late - 1700s - and even that from old French word 'puce', meaning flea. Couleur puce means flea coloured and, of course, when it's had a feed of blood puce is exactly the colour of a flea. So maybe Puce Bush was a flea infested wood or, as an alterative speculation, a woodland area covered in purple heather perhaps.

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@lilbill15 Have you read the Extensive Urban Survey of Northumberland (sub-section Bedlington). It's well worth a read:

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/northumberland_eus_2011/downloadmenu.cfm?REDSQUIDARCHIVES_53e8bf38-a9b8-4597-8642-4228eca8bd15_0

 

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10 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

Puce Bush goes back to 1865 on maps, with the exception of OS 1966 - 1972 (can't be more speciic) where it is written "Pace Bush". I don't know if it's the same place sometimes referred to as Pease Bush. Puce Bush is in itself quite an interesting name.

Bush, as we understand it today, has its roots (pardon the pun) in the northern Germanic languages but one theory is that they were influenced by the old French word 'bois' meaning woods/thicket/ forest. This was the original meaning of the word even in English but it has evolved to refer to only one particular form of plant.

Puce, as you probably know, is a purplish brown  colour but do you know where that colour gets its name from? The word puce came into the English language quite late - 1700s - and even that from old French word 'puce', meaning flea. Couleur puce means flea coloured and, of course, when it's had a feed of blood puce is exactly the colour of a flea. So maybe Puce Bush was a flea infested wood or, as an alterative speculation, a woodland area covered in purple heather perhaps.

Oh, that’s very interesting- certainly food for thought, thank you x seeing the word ‘Bois’ in the midst of your response took me instantly to Cambois (with an e at the end on one old map I’ve seen) I have occasionally heard folk pronounce it Camwah, sometimes joking but the most recent was a couple of cyclists with a map open who asked me the name of the locale and they expressed surprise when I said ‘Camus’ and not Camwah but they were relieved to know where they were in relation to their map. I’ve long wondered where the name Cambois came from, suspected a french link. That’s by the bye, I’ll be scouring modern maps for any reference to puce/pease currently: not allowed any more emojis today, suffice to say thanks again  for more brain fodder x

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17 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

@lilbill15 Have you read the Extensive Urban Survey of Northumberland (sub-section Bedlington). It's well worth a read:

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/northumberland_eus_2011/downloadmenu.cfm?REDSQUIDARCHIVES_53e8bf38-a9b8-4597-8642-4228eca8bd15_0

 

@Canny lass  Hahaha! x Surprisingly I haven’t read that yet, but will do so with great relish , thank you very much x

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5 hours ago, Canny lass said:

@lilbill15 Have you read the Extensive Urban Survey of Northumberland (sub-section Bedlington). It's well worth a read:

https://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/northumberland_eus_2011/downloadmenu.cfm?REDSQUIDARCHIVES_53e8bf38-a9b8-4597-8642-4228eca8bd15_0

 

@Canny lass, brilliant, thank you very much xx, there’s loads of information in this document , just what I’ve been looking for but not knowing of it’s existence. This should stop me asking too many daft questions. I’m very grateful xx

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