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Tindall family


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This is a mystery :iiam:  !

See Maggie’s topic, started 26 July 2013 “Bedlington Equitable Industrial Cooperative Society”. I think that the John Davison Tindal (Secretary) named in the list of officers of the society is the same person.

Note the name is spelled Tindal, rather than Tindall – as inscribed on the tray.

The Tindal’s (one L) seem to have been a relatively well-to-do family in Bedlington - the type of family who could present such a tray. The 1881 census records the parents of John D Tindal living on Front Street, Bedlington. His father, James - born in Nottingham, is a tailor by trade and his mother Isabella (born about 1855 in Bedlington) has the same profession. They have, as well as John 4 years old and born in Bedlington, a daughter aged 5 years (Lizzie?) and another, Maria, aged one year.

Hoever, they don’t appear to have always lived there. James and Isabella get a mention in in the North East War Memorial project in relation to Louis William Studdy, whose family are living in Ridge Terrace, Bedlington while he, Louis William, is resident at” 4 Fairfield road, Jesmond - with his uncle James Tindal, a tailor’s cutter and his wife Isabella, born 1855 in Bedlington”.

By the time the 1911 census was completed, John D Tindal, was 24 years old and, like his father, a tailor by trade. He was then living in the last house on Burdon Terrace, nearest West End, and married to 29 year old Dora A.G Tindall, a Greengrocery shopkeeper.  John D Tindal died 1947 aged 70 years (therefore, born about 1877). It may have been trough his tailoring that he was connected with the Cooperative Society.

I can’t help wondering where the Church of Christ was/is situated in Bedlington and if the tray was found in the same building or somewhere else. Could it have been wrongly inscribed by the engraver and therefore never presented to the Church of Christ? Otherwise, it surely still belongs to the church? 1947 wasn’t so long ago.

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18 hours ago, Canny lass said:

I can’t help wondering where the Church of Christ was/is situated in Bedlington 

CL - Church of Christ = Front Street West and the Lion Garage extended it's buildings replacing the church. Garth Cottage was next to the church and the church caretaker's family, Marley, lived in Garth Cottage. Mr Marley worked at the Dr Pit and he and his wife were church caretakers. I know that info as back in the 1950's I used to attended the Church of Christ Sunday School held in the single story building behind the church. The caretakers grand daughter also went to the Sunday School (as did @Ovalteeny) and I courted that young lady in the late 1960's and visited Garth Cottage many times.

Garth Cottage.jpg

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)
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18 hours ago, Canny lass said:

This is a mystery :iiam:  !

See Maggie’s topic, started 26 July 2013 “Bedlington Equitable Industrial Cooperative Society”. I think that the John Davison Tindal (Secretary) named in the list of officers of the society is the same person.

Note the name is spelled Tindal, rather than Tindall – as inscribed on the tray.

The Tindal’s (one L) seem to have been a relatively well-to-do family in Bedlington - the type of family who could present such a tray. The 1881 census records the parents of John D Tindal living on Front Street, Bedlington. His father, James - born in Nottingham, is a tailor by trade and his mother Isabella (born about 1855 in Bedlington) has the same profession. They have, as well as John 4 years old and born in Bedlington, a daughter aged 5 years (Lizzie?) and another, Maria, aged one year.

I must have missed Maggie's topic :). Another member @graeme had posted pages from that book and I created an album in the gallery :- 

Page 47 of the book has the list of officers of the society and the Tindal Talor, as well as the secretary, gets a mention.

Page57.jpg

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3 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

I must have missed Maggie's topic :). Another member @graeme had posted pages from that book and I created an album in the gallery :- 

I must have missed your album as i can't remember seeing those pages before. That's my bedtime reading sorted out for tonight!

That Chronicle of events is very interesting, not only for the Tindal information. First. I can see that Netherton 'store' - the co-op - was established in Jan 1903 which fills another gap in my knowledge of Netherton. Second, I see that in August 1894 a "Mr R Studdy" was appointed General Secretary of the bedlington Branch. That's the father of Louis William Studdy, who i mentioned above as living in Jesmond with his aunt and uncle, Isabella and James Tindal.

P.S. I've just found the entry in the register of deaths for John Davison Tindal. His death was registered in the third quarter (July/August/September) of 1947 which fits in rather nicely with the date on the tray.  

Edited by Canny lass
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35 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

I don't suppose you could ask Lewis Barker, who posted the photo of the tray, where it was found? In Bedlington? If so where?

Unfortunately not as it wasn't Lewis Barker that posted the photo + comment on the Bygone Bedlington group. But I can, and will, ask Hazel Krzyzanowski that 'Shared' Lewis's posting  (from somewhere on Facebook) if she is in contact with Lewis and if she will ask her :). Let you know if Hazel replies.

This is the full posting :- 

Tindall.jpg

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Thanks Eggy! I see from the other photo that it's not exactly the 'tray' I thought it was. The last time I saw anything like that - chalice, bottle and case (I'm assuming it's a set) - it was being used to administer the last rights in a hospital. It's called a Last Rights Box. The bottle contains holy water.

Come to think of it, the IHS could stand for Jesus but I think the one I saw had IHC.

Edited by Canny lass
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On 20/01/2021 at 19:09, Canny lass said:

I don't suppose you could ask Lewis Barker, who posted the photo of the tray, where it was found? In Bedlington? If so where?

@Canny lass - reply on Facebook from Hazel Krzyzanowski - ' ..sorry I don't know anything about it . I just shared the posting off someone in our group, sorry xxx'

Normally that means that the photo + comment, from the person who initially posted it, has been 'Shared' = posted from one Facebook member to another and so on and so on - so tracking back to Lewis barker could be a never ending trail of 'Shares'.

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  • 1 month later...
13 hours ago, JosephineFunderburk said:

I'd like to see it on my own...

@JosephineFunderburk - do you mean you would like to contact Lewis Barker who posted the photo of the John D Dindall silver plate?

If so then you would have so search Facebook, where the photo was posted and 'Shared' from and see how many Lewis barker's there are and see if you can identify the one that posted the photo. The only clue we have is that this Lewis Barker could live in Ashington - but nobody, that I am aware of, has searched for him.☺️ 

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On 19/01/2021 at 19:46, Canny lass said:

This is a mystery :iiam:  !

See Maggie’s topic, started 26 July 2013 “Bedlington Equitable Industrial Cooperative Society”. I think that the John Davison Tindal (Secretary) named in the list of officers of the society is the same person.

Note the name is spelled Tindal, rather than Tindall – as inscribed on the tray.

The Tindal’s (one L) seem to have been a relatively well-to-do family in Bedlington - the type of family who could present such a tray. The 1881 census records the parents of John D Tindal living on Front Street, Bedlington. His father, James - born in Nottingham, is a tailor by trade and his mother Isabella (born about 1855 in Bedlington) has the same profession. They have, as well as John 4 years old and born in Bedlington, a daughter aged 5 years (Lizzie?) and another, Maria, aged one year.

Hoever, they don’t appear to have always lived there. James and Isabella get a mention in in the North East War Memorial project in relation to Louis William Studdy, whose family are living in Ridge Terrace, Bedlington while he, Louis William, is resident at” 4 Fairfield road, Jesmond - with his uncle James Tindal, a tailor’s cutter and his wife Isabella, born 1855 in Bedlington”.

By the time the 1911 census was completed, John D Tindal, was 24 years old and, like his father, a tailor by trade. He was then living in the last house on Burdon Terrace, nearest West End, and married to 29 year old Dora A.G Tindall, a Greengrocery shopkeeper.  John D Tindal died 1947 aged 70 years (therefore, born about 1877). It may have been trough his tailoring that he was connected with the Cooperative Society.

I can’t help wondering where the Church of Christ was/is situated in Bedlington and if the tray was found in the same building or somewhere else. Could it have been wrongly inscribed by the engraver and therefore never presented to the Church of Christ? Otherwise, it surely still belongs to the church? 1947 wasn’t so long ago.

I have also got connections with the Church Of Christ as that was my mother's church when she moved from Edinburgh to Bedlington after marrying my father.

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