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Canny lass

Friday night is quiz night ('cos I know you've got nothing better to do just now)

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1.         Who performed the theme song in the James Bond film Thunderball? John Woodward, better known as Tom Jones.      

2.        What is the capital of the Dominican Republic? Santo Domingo.

3.         What is an odalisque?

4.         Which of Henry VIII’s wives is buried alongside him at Windsor?

5.         In which country does the Amazon river meet the sea? Brazil

6.         Which sport was played by Peanut Louie?

7.         Which bird has the scientific name Troglodytes Troglodytes?

8.         Which David presented Juke Box Jury? Jacobs.

9.         Which Sunday newspaper first hit the streets of London in 1843? News of the World.

10.      From which animal did Jenner develop his smallpox vaccine? Cow

11.      What name is given to words such as deed, minim, madam and rotavator?

12.      What makes stainless steel stainless? Chromium, and Molybdenum prevent corrosion!

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1.         Who performed the theme song in the James Bond film Thunderball?

Answer = Tom Jones

The album was first released by United Artists Records in 1965 in both monaural and stereo editions, with a CD release in 1988.

1255647424_1Thunderball.jpg.abd273dffb2bfca901ec86bb8cbbef88.jpg

2.         What is the capital of the Dominican Republic?

Answer = Santo Domingo

Capital of the Dominican Republic. It is situated on the southeast coast of the island of Hispaniola, at the mouth of the Ozama River, and is the oldest permanent city established by Europeans in the Western Hemisphere.

 

3.         What is an odalisque?

Answer = a female slave or concubine in a harem, especially one in the seraglio of the Sultan of Turkey.

1392657760_3Gustave.jpg.2d9b61b03a552185d5b5d9c3643ca1d6.jpg

4.         Which of Henry VIII’s wives is buried alongside him at Windsor

Answer = Jane Semour

It was the end of an era. His will commanded he be buried with his beloved wife Jane Seymour, the only wife to give birth to a surviving legitimate male heir. Henry had given her a magnificent funeral after which she was buried in a vault under the quire of St. George's Chapel in Windsor.

180945946_4JaneSeymour.jpg.18f00522d60be81139002cc337789330.jpg

5.         In which country does the Amazon river meet the sea?

Answer = Brazil

The Amazon River is located in the northern portion of South America, flowing from west to east. The river system originates in the Andes Mountains of Peru and travels through Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Bolivia, and Brazil before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean.

164976205_5Amazon.jpg.05c39e53d4d925084269facb86859a25.jpg

6.         Which sport was played by Peanut Louie?

Answer = tennis

Peanut Louie Harper (born August 15, 1960) is a retired American tennis player, born in San Francisco, California to Ron and Alice Louie. She was a top-ranked junior tennis player and professional tennis player on the WTA tour.

 

2051724705_6Peanut.jpg.ec9db75233a234f4af9339bbf727419c.jpg

7.         Which bird has the scientific name Troglodytes Troglodytes?

Answer = wren

The Eurasian wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) is a very small bird, and the only member of the wren family Troglodytidae found in Eurasia and Africa (Maghreb). In Anglophone Europe, it is commonly known simply as the wren.

1218501969_7wren.jpg.44f49705853410b30e4435ff76d8f663.jpg

8.         Which David presented Juke Box Jury?

Answer = David Jacobs

Juke Box Jury 1 June 1959 - was chaired by David Jacobs. Each week he played a selection of 7" singles on a large juke box to a panel of four celebrities. As the music played the camera moved over the faces of the panelists and the audience so the viewer could gauge their reaction. The panelists then gave their opinion of the discs and voted them a hit or a miss. If there was a tie a jury of teenagers drawn from the audience would have the deciding vote. Each week a mystery performer was revealed after the panel had voted on his or her disc, to the joy or embarrassment of the panel.

1906579244_8DavidJacobs.jpg.1db8befee08e4a12d48f229c783220d8.jpg

9.         Which Sunday newspaper first hit the streets of London in 1843?:huh: Google says 1842:wave:

Answer = The Illustrated London News

appeared first on Saturday 14 May 1842, as the world's first illustrated weekly news magazine. Founded by Herbert Ingram, it appeared weekly until 1971, then less frequently thereafter, and ceased publication in 2003.

821258413_9LondonNews.jpg.f2349fb2525aaf51db872cf59cc362cf.jpg

10.      From which animal did Jenner develop his smallpox vaccine?

Answer = cow = cowpox

While Jenner's interest in the protective effects of cowpox began during his apprenticeship with George Harwicke, it was 1796 before he made the first step in the long process whereby smallpox, the scourge of mankind, would be totally eradicated. For many years, he had heard the tales that dairymaids were protected from smallpox naturally after having suffered from cowpox. Pondering this, Jenner concluded that cowpox not only protected against smallpox but also could be transmitted from one person to another as a deliberate mechanism of protection. In May 1796, Edward Jenner found a young dairymaid, Sarah Nelms, who had fresh cowpox lesions on her hands and arms (Figure (Figure33). On May 14, 1796, using matter from Nelms' lesions, he inoculated an 8-year-old boy, James Phipps. Subsequently, the boy developed mild fever and discomfort in the axillae. Nine days after the procedure he felt cold and had lost his appetite, but on the next day he was much better. In July 1796, Jenner inoculated the boy again, this time with matter from a fresh smallpox lesion. No disease developed, and Jenner concluded that protection was complete .

731583574_10pox.jpg.277620930467f4dd457d5731e659521b.jpg

11.      What name is given to words such as deed, minim, madam and rotavator?

Answer = palindromic

A Palindrome :- Dammit, I'm Mad!

2092559885_1111.jpg.b04b9b1efa0f16287f065c21bd7a714b.jpg

12.      What makes stainless steel stainless?

Answer = chromium

The best-known grade is Type 304, also known as 18/8 and 18/10 for its composition of 18% chromium and 8%/10% nickel, respectively.

What do you call a dog with no hind legs and stainless steel testicles?

                                                                                                                                                    Sparky.

What do you call a bank robbery with no blood spilt?

 

                                                                                                                                                       A stainless steal.

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

 

An iceberg bigger than Belgium was seen in the southern Pacific Ocean in 1956.

Answer = I didn’t – it hasn’t been on QI:(

The largest iceberg on record was an Antarctic tabular iceberg of over 31,000 square kilometres (12,000 sq mi) [335 by 97 kilometres (208 by 60 mi)] sighted 150 miles (240 km) west of Scott Island, in the South Pacific Ocean, by the USS Glacier on November 12, 1956. This iceberg was larger than Belgium.

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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On 10/04/2020 at 16:44, Canny lass said:

The judges decision is final

I am the judge

Google can say whatever it likes! 

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44 minutes ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Answer = The Illustrated London News

appeared first on Saturday 14 May 1842,

Go on then, one good turn deserves another so I'll let you have another crack at that one. My generosity overwhelms me at times!

Clue: Which Sunday newspaper first hit the streets of London in 1843?:wave:

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5 minutes ago, Canny lass said:

Go on then, one good turn deserves another so I'll let you have another crack at that one. My generosity overwhelms me at times!

Clue: Which Sunday newspaper first hit the streets of London in 1843?:wave:

Doh - I must try harder and stop skipping words, like Sunday:wacko:

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Answers to last week's quiz:

1.       Tom Jones

2.       Santo Domingo

3.       A female slave

4.       Jane Seymour

5.       Brazil

6.       Lawn Tennis

7.       Wren

8.       David Jacobs

9.       News Of The World

10.   Cow

11.   Palindrome

12.   Chromium

New, tougher, quiz tomorrow!

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This weeks quiz:

Ready, steady go!

1.         From which language does the word ketchup come?

2.         Of which country was Pakistan part until 1947?

3.         Which high - jumper used his flop technique to win the high jump at the 1968 Olympics?

4.         Kelts, alevins and grilse are all forms of what?

5.         Which English girls name means ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ in Greek?

6.         In which sport can you find something named after Ulrich Salchow?

7.         In the Tarzan novels who was known as Korak?

8.         What is the capital of the Philipines?

9.         Elvis Presley had three successive No 1 hits in the UK charts in 1961. Name one?

10.      Which London monument was cast from the guns recovered from the wreck of the Royal George?

11.      What was a bridewell?

12.      Which unit of measurement was based on the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger? 
 

Bonus question for 10 points:

The dividing line between genius and insane is a very fine one. On which side of the line do we find Donald Trump?

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

Each day is longer than the previous one by 0.00000002 seconds, which works out to be 13 seconds each century.

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1.         From which language does the word ketchup come?

2.         Of which country was Pakistan part until 1947? India

3.         Which high - jumper used his flop technique to win the high jump at the 1968 Olympics? Fosbury

4.         Kelts, alevins and grilse are all forms of what? Salmon

5.         Which English girls name means ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ in Greek?

6.         In which sport can you find something named after Ulrich Salchow? Figure skating

7.         In the Tarzan novels who was known as Korak?

8.         What is the capital of the Philippines? Manila

9.         Elvis Presley had three successive No 1 hits in the UK charts in 1961. Name one?

10.      Which London monument was cast from the guns recovered from the wreck of the Royal George? Nelson’s column.

11.      What was a bridewell? Gaol.

12.      Which unit of measurement was based on the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger? Cubit

 

Bonus question for 10 points:

The dividing line between genius and insane is a very fine one. On which side of the line do we find Donald Trump?

He’s not even close to the line.

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

Each day is longer than the previous one by 0.00000002 seconds, which works out to be 13 seconds each century.

And I thought it was my Timex acting up!

Edited by Vic Patterson
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6 hours ago, Canny lass said:

This weeks quiz:

Ready, steady go!

1.         From which language does the word ketchup come?                                                                      An American version of English

2.         Of which country was Pakistan part until 1947?                                                                                                  India

3.         Which high - jumper used his flop technique to win the high jump at the 1968 Olympics?                          Dick Fosbury

4.         Kelts, alevins and grilse are all forms of what?                                                                                                     Salmon  

5.         Which English girls name means ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ in Greek?

6.         In which sport can you find something named after Ulrich Salchow?

7.         In the Tarzan novels who was known as Korak?                                                                                                    Elephant

8.         What is the capital of the Philipines?                                                                                                                        Manila

9.         Elvis Presley had three successive No 1 hits in the UK charts in 1961. Name one?                                        Return to sender

10.      Which London monument was cast from the guns recovered from the wreck of the Royal George?           Earos

11.      What was a bridewell?

12.      Which unit of measurement was based on the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger?     Cubit
 

Bonus question for 10 points:

The dividing line between genius and insane is a very fine one. On which side of the line do we find Donald Trump?  Insane

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

Each day is longer than the previous one by 0.00000002 seconds, which works out to be 13 seconds each century.

 

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1.         From which language does the word ketchup come?

Answer = China

Ketchup comes from the Hokkien Chinese word, kê-tsiap, the name of a sauce derived from fermented fish. It is believed that traders brought fish sauce from Vietnam to southeastern China.

1996144381_1k-tsiap.jpg.4491c1b5990bfce7db03450f28690649.jpg 

2.         Of which country was Pakistan part until 1947?

Answer =  India

 

3.         Which high - jumper used his flop technique to win the high jump at the 1968 Olympics? 

Answer = Dick Fosbury

Dick Fosbury won the gold medal in the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City

1360961602_3DickFosby.png.a451271304199804ea359500437b0522.png 

4.         Kelts, alevins and grilse are all forms of what?

Answer =  Salmon

Salmon are anadromous, which means they are born in fresh water, they migrate to salt water, and then they return to freshwater to spawn.

Atlantic salmon sold in the U.S. are all farm raised

 

5.         Which English girls name means ‘strange’ or ‘foreign’ in Greek?

Answer = Barbara

Barbara is a given name used in numerous languages. It is the feminine form of the Greek word barbaros (Greek: βάρβαρος) meaning "strange" or "foreign", from which the current term Barbarian is also derived.

 1823833426_5Barbara.jpg.d360aab2f8eb894a788800526a01d1c9.jpg

6.         In which sport can you find something named after Ulrich Salchow?

Answer = Figure skating

The salchow is accomplished with a takeoff from the back inside edge of one foot and a landing on the back outside edge of the opposite foot. It is "usually the first jump that skaters learn to double, and the first or second to triple".

 

7.         In the Tarzan novels who was known as Korak?

Answer = John "Jack" Clayton III

Korak, a fictional character, is the ape name of John "Jack" Clayton III, Earl of Greystoke, the son of Tarzan and Jane Porter.

 787177618_7Korak.jpg.cb93a920b85f2c4c7240eecc43cafe62.jpg

8.         What is the capital of the Philippines? 

Answer = Manila

 

9.         Elvis Presley had three successive No 1 hits in the UK charts in 1961. Name one?

Answer = Wooden Heart

First record I ever bought and it was for my mam on Mothers Day.

Another one was  :- "(Marie's the Name) His Latest Flame" / "Little Sister"

BUT don’t know what the third one was. ‘It's Now or Never’ was No 1 on the 3rd November 1960 for  8 weeks and Cliff was No 1, with ‘I Love You’ on the 29th December 1960 = According to WIKIPEDIA.

 

 

10.      Which London monument was cast from the guns recovered from the wreck of the Royal George?

Answer = Nelson’s Column

 535175803_10Nelson.jpg.a7a8f690a7db0be3189e7b1f361721b2.jpg

1. Nelson’s Column was built between 1840 and 1843, after William Railton won a protracted competition to design the structure. The original decision to award Railton the contract was overturned, but his design emerged triumphant in the re-run.

 

2. The monument is built of the Corinthian order, a style of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. It is characterised by slender fluted columns and elaborate capitals, which are decorated with acanthus leaves and scrolls.

 

3. Nelson’s Column cost £47,000 to built in the 1840s, which is the equivalent of between £3 million and £4 million today. Most of the money came from private investors, with the Tsar of Russia footing more than a quarter of the bill on his own.

 

4. Nelson’s Column was constructed out of Dartmoor granite and weighs around 2,500 tonnes. It was originally meant to be built entirely out of sandstone, but the plan was changed shortly before construction started.

 

5. The 18 ft 1 in (5.5 m) statue of Admiral Nelson which stands on top of the column, designed by Sir Edwin Landseer, is built out of sandstone rather than granite.

 

6. Part of Admiral Nelson’s shoulder was chipped when the column was struck by lightning during an electrical storm in 1896.

 

7. When the column was measured in 2006, during a £420,000 renovation, it was discovered that the monument is 14 ft 6 in (4.4 m) shorter than had always been thought. The actual height of Nelson’s Column, from the bottom of the pedestal to the top of Nelson’s hat, is 169 ft 3 in (51.6 m).

 

8. The original proposal was for a 203 ft (62 m) column, however construction plans were scaled back due to concerns over stability and cost.

 

9. The four bronze lions which sit at the base of Nelson’s Column were added in 1867, almost 25 years after the monument was erected. They all sit in same position, but are – to the surprise of many – not identical.

 

10. The four panels at the bottom of the monument each depict a scene from Nelson’s most famous battles: the Battle of the Nile, the Battle of Copenhagen, the Battle of Cape St Vincent and his death at the Battle of Trafalgar.

 

11. The panels were made from French guns which were captured and melted down. Four different artists designed each of the panel depictions: Musgrave Watson, William F. Woodington, John Ternouth and John Edward Carew.

 

12. In 2011, consultants employed by the Greater London Authority reported that ‘considerable damage’ has been caused by tourists climbing on the lions. The report called for a ban to be enforced, in order to protect the structures, although English Heritage opposed this course of action.

 

13. Had Adolf Hitler succeeded in invading the UK during the Second World War, he planned to relocate Nelson’s Column from central London to Berlin.

 

14. John Noakes, a presenter on BBC TV children’s programme ‘Blue Peter’, climbed Nelson’s Column in the late 1970s. He is just one of many people – including journalists, stuntmen and political protesters – to have scaled the monument.

 

15. Nelson’s Column was not the first civic monument erected in the admiral’s honour. A 44-metre obelisk was built on Glasgow Green in Scotland in 1806, just one year after Nelson’s death in battle and almost a quarter of a century before work began in Trafalgar Square. Other monuments can be found in Edinburgh, Forres, Dublin, Birmingham, Liverpool, Portsmouth, Hereford and Great Yarmouth.

 

11.      What was a bridewell? 

Answer = Gaol

The OED tells me that bridewell is a mid 16th century term for a petty offender’s prison and it was named after St. Bride’s Well, in the City of London

 2127625584_11bridewell.jpg.2ed39f47891e27249b89f7442925f70d.jpg

12.      Which unit of measurement was based on the distance from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger? 

Answer = Cubit

The cubit, generally taken as equal to 18 inches (457 mm), was based on the length of the arm from the elbow to the tip of the middle finger and was considered the equivalent of 6 palms or 2 spans.

 

 

Bonus question for 10 points:

The dividing line between genius and insane is a very fine one. On which side of the line do we find Donald Trump?

Neither – I think he should be divided by the line.

 

How do Mexicans feel about Trump’s wall? – They’ll get over it.

 

A man goes into heaven and there he meets jesus. He asks Jesus what that broken clock is there for. Jesus says “that is Mother Teresa’s clock it has never moved because she has never lied”. “There is Abraham Lincolns clock. He has .lied twice so it has moved twice.” “Where is Donald Trump’s?” Ask’s the man. Jesus answers “it is in my office, I am using it as a ceiling fan.”

 

Donald Trump wants to ban the sale of pre-shredded cheese. – He wants to make America grate again.

 Donald.jpg.d0d5e9d38fcc6d8ff30ea0f67340f74c.jpg

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

Each day is longer than the previous one by 0.00000002 seconds, which works out to be 13 seconds each century.

I didn’t

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4 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

How do Mexicans feel about Trump’s wall? – They’ll get over it.

 

A man goes into heaven and there he meets jesus. He asks Jesus what that broken clock is there for. Jesus says “that is Mother Teresa’s clock it has never moved because she has never lied”. “There is Abraham Lincolns clock. He has .lied twice so it has moved twice.” “Where is Donald Trump’s?” Ask’s the man. Jesus answers “it is in my office, I am using it as a ceiling fan.”

 

Donald Trump wants to ban the sale of pre-shredded cheese. – He wants to make America grate again.

... and it's not even Tuesday!

I'm not getting the message on the picture. Is there a punch line following or am I thick?

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2 hours ago, Canny lass said:

I'm not getting the message on the picture. Is there a punch line following or am I thick?

Nope - never thick young lady. The text is just based on the old jokes that would start with - An Englishman, an Irishman and a Scotsman go into a bar and the Englisman says.......................... - that's nowt (just for Bill:D) says the Irishman .............................. - well that's nowt says the Scotsman ....................................

Now they don't brag or tell tales etc etc they just moan at Trump.:argue:   

It's this Lockdown, I'm getting me days mixed up :o

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)
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On 24/08/2020 at 20:31, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Nope - never thick young lady.

Two compliments in one! Not 'thick' and I'm 'young'. You're spoiling me! Are you perchance looking for extra points in this week's quiz?

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Answers to last week's quiz:

1.       Chinese

2.       India

3.       Dick Fosbury

4.       Salmon

5.       Barbara

6.       Ice skating

7.       Tarzan’s son

8.       Manila

9.       Are you lonesome tonight, Wooden heart, Surrender

10.   The base of Nelson’s Column inTrafalgar Square

11.   A prison

12.   Cubit

New quiz tomorrow.

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New quiz!

1.         Charles Rolls founded Rolls Royce in 1906 but what aviation record did he set in 1910?

2.         In which year was Lord Mountbatten killed by the IRA?

3.         If you were described as an ectomorph what would you be?

4.         What is a young male zebra called?

5.         Which football club folded in 1992 after 66 years in the League?

6.         Who designed the Volkswagen car?

7.         What is the country home of the Marquess of Bath?

8.         How many furlongs in a mile?

9.         In which conflict did Prince Andrew fly a helicopter?

10.      In which sport could you have a York Round and a Hereford Round?

11.      What name is given to expressions like ‘catch the town drain’ and ‘tasted two worms’?

12.      How many eggs does a peacock lay in a year? 

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

Russian maps used to show Moscow a few miles away from its actual position to confuse guided-missile programmers.

Answers on Thursday!

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1.         Charles Rolls founded Rolls Royce in 1906 but what aviation record did he set in 1910? First nonstop return flight to France.

2.         In which year was Lord Mountbatten killed by the IRA?

3.         If you were described as an ectomorph what would you be? Skinny.

4.         What is a young male zebra called? Marty, Foal.

5.         Which football club folded in 1992 after 66 years in the League?

6.         Who designed the Volkswagen car? Which one? Beetle, Béla Barényi

7.         What is the country home of the Marquess of Bath?

8.         How many furlongs in a mile? 8 ish

9.         In which conflict did Prince Andrew fly a helicopter? Falklands.

10.      In which sport could you have a York Round and a Hereford Round? Archery.

11.      What name is given to expressions like ‘catch the town drain’ and ‘tasted two worms’?

12.      How many eggs does a peacock lay in a year? Not as many as a peahen.

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1.         Charles Rolls founded Rolls Royce in 1906 but what aviation record did he set in 1910? He flew over the channel and back non stop.

2.         In which year was Lord Mountbatten killed by the IRA?                                                                                    1973

3.         If you were described as an ectomorph what would you be?

4.         What is a young male zebra called?                                                                                                                      A colt

5.         Which football club folded in 1992 after 66 years in the League?

6.         Who designed the Volkswagen car?                                                                                                                     Ferdinand Porsche 

7.         What is the country home of the Marquess of Bath?                                                                                         Longleat

8.         How many furlongs in a mile?                                                                                                                                 8

9.         In which conflict did Prince Andrew fly a helicopter?                                                                                          The Falklands

10.      In which sport could you have a York Round and a Hereford Round?

11.      What name is given to expressions like ‘catch the town drain’ and ‘tasted two worms’?

12.      How many eggs does a peacock lay in a year?                                                                                     None. It's the Peahen that lays eggs

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1.         Charles Rolls founded Rolls Royce in 1906 but what aviation record did he set in 1910?

Answer = the first two-way, non-stop English Channel flight .

 

In 1901 with Frank Hedges Butler of the ballooning club that became the Royal Aero Club in March 1910 he was the second person they licensed to fly an aeroplane. He became the first man to make a non-stop double crossing of the English Channel by plane taking 95 minutes on 2 June 1910.

 

2.         In which year was Lord Mountbatten killed by the IRA?

Answer = 1979

 

3.         If you were described as an ectomorph what would you be?

Answer = slim – like I used to be.

239286285_3bodytypes.png.2dec39dab07f2438034126e0cf5c0fb5.png

4.         What is a young male zebra called?

Answer = Foal

QUESTION – Is a zebra black or white?

 

5.         Which football club folded in 1992 after 66 years in the League?

Answer = Maidstone United ???????????????

 

6.         Who designed the Volkswagen car? Which one?

Answer = Ferdinand Porsche & Ferdinand Anton Ernst Porche

1800144290_6VW.jpg.d79d9b5d54a319b049e4f6a81f9f0ab8.jpg

7.         What is the country home of the Marquess of Bath?

Answer = Longleat

197458686_7Longleat.jpg.30166b308cb7f11bbfd8411b94d075e6.jpg

8.         How many furlongs in a mile?

Answer = 8. 1 furlong = 220 yards

The name furlong derives from the Old English words furh (furrow) and lang (long). Dating back at least to early Anglo-Saxon times, it originally referred to the length of the furrow in one acre of a ploughed open field (a medieval communal field which was divided into strips).

779443911_8furlong.jpg.e331a90ed36da5968d4817bb0136c6f7.jpg

9.         In which conflict did Prince Andrew fly a helicopter?

 

Answer = The Falklands

129066241_9Helicopter.jpg.47790adeaf35577e5111a8933aea2539.jpg

 

10.      In which sport could you have a York Round and a Hereford Round?

Answer = Archery with a MASSIVE quivver

York: The York round is in general shot as a gents round using 5 zone scoring. It consists of 12 dozen (144) arrows shot at three different distances as listed below. 6 dozen (72) arrows shot in 6 arrow ends at a distance of 100 yards (91.4 metres).

 

766213395_10quivver.jpg.b9149f7a5021b0d3e76bc8444bb07299.jpg

11.      What name is given to expressions like ‘catch the town drain’ and ‘tasted two worms’?

Answer = Spoonerism

William Archibald Spooner (22 July 1844 – 29 August 1930) was a long-serving Oxford don. He was most notable for his absent-mindedness, and for supposedly mixing up the syllables in a spoken phrase, with unintentionally comic effect.

 

"It is kisstomary to cuss the bride” = ….customary to kiss the bride

"I am tired of addressing beery wenches"  = …..weary benches

"Mardon me padam, this pie is occupewed. Can I sew you to another sheet?"  = Pardon me, madam, this pew is occupied. Can I show you to another seat?

"You have hissed all my mystery lectures, and were caught fighting a liar in the quad. Having tasted two worms, you will leave by the next town drain" = You have missed all my history lectures, and were caught lighting a fire in the quad. Having wasted two terms, you will leave by the next down train.

1391645849_11Spoon.thumb.jpg.aaa02453ef00033213f78c8604bb3539.jpg

 

12.      How many eggs does a peacock lay in a year?

Answer = 0

 1954525323_12zero.jpg.df69922a90f336b5d53c625357cc32e8.jpg

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

 

Russian maps used to show Moscow a few miles away from its actual position to confuse guided-missile programmers.

Answer = I didn’t.

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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Answers to last week's quiz:

1.       First to fly non-stop across the channel and back.

2.       1979

3.       Thin

4.       A colt

5.       Aldershot

6.       Porsche

7.       Longleat

8.       Eight

9.       Falklands War

10.   Archery

11.   Spoonerism

12.   None, but peahens

New quiz tomorrow.

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On 31/08/2020 at 13:37, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

6.         Who designed the Volkswagen car? Which one?

The Volksvagen. Not the Volksvagen Golf or any other version. Porsche called his design simply 'Volksvagen'. This was, I am lead to believe' in the days before the company 'Volksvagen was formed. That company also used the name Volksvagen  but added a model name.

 

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This week's quiz:

1.         Who was the original lead singer with heavy rock band Deep Purple?

2.         Who was Liza Minelli’s famous mother?

3.         Which football league club used to play at Goldstone Ground?

4.         Roy Jenkins was the founder of which political party?

5.         What type of creature is a ‘flying phalanger’?

6.         What is the capital of Honduras?

7.         What name is commonly given to the area around Stoke-on-Trent?

8.         Who invented the bouncing bomb (and no, it wasn’t Bobby Ball)?

9.         Over what distance is the Classic horse race ‘The Oaks’ run?

10.      Who coined the phrase “a land fit for heroes to live in”?

11.      Which reactive metal is represented by the symbol Ba?

12.      If Monday’s child is fair of face what is Wednesday’s child? 

 

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

Queen Elizabeth I was the first English queen to see herself in a mirror. She banned them from court as she aged.

Answers on Thursday

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1.         Who was the original lead singer with heavy rock band Deep Purple?

2.         Who was Liza Minelli’s famous mother?                                                     Judy Garland

3.         Which football league club used to play at Goldstone Ground?

4.         Roy Jenkins was the founder of which political party?                              Liberal democrats

5.         What type of creature is a ‘flying phalanger’?                                               A type of flying(gliding) Squirrel

6.         What is the capital of Honduras?

7.         What name is commonly given to the area around Stoke-on-Trent?        The Potteries

8.         Who invented the bouncing bomb (and no, it wasn’t Bobby Ball)?            Barnes Wallis 

9.         Over what distance is the Classic horse race ‘The Oaks’ run?                    3 miles

10.      Who coined the phrase “a land fit for heroes to live in”?                               Winston Churchill

11.      Which reactive metal is represented by the symbol Ba?

12.      If Monday’s child is fair of face what is Wednesday’s child?                       Full of Woe

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This week's quiz:

1.         Who was the original lead singer with heavy rock band Deep Purple?     Ian Gillan

2.         Who was Liza Minelli’s famous mother?    Judy Garland

3.         Which football league club used to play at Goldstone Ground?   Brighton & Hove Albion FC

4.         Roy Jenkins was the founder of which political party?   Lib dems

5.         What type of creature is a ‘flying phalanger’?    Squirrel

6.         What is the capital of Honduras?    Tegusicalpa

7.         What name is commonly given to the area around Stoke-on-Trent?   The Potteries (lived there from 1973-82)

8.         Who invented the bouncing bomb (and no, it wasn’t Bobby Ball)?    Barnes Wallace

9.         Over what distance is the Classic horse race ‘The Oaks’ run?     1mile 2 furlong

10.      Who coined the phrase “a land fit for heroes to live in”?      Winston Churchill

11.      Which reactive metal is represented by the symbol Ba?     Barium

12.      If Monday’s child is fair of face what is Wednesday’s child?   Full of Woe

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1.         Who was the original lead singer with heavy rock band Deep Purple?

Answer = Rod Evans

Deep Purple are a British hard rock band originally from Hertford. Formed in March 1968, the group originally included vocalist Rod Evans, guitarist Ritchie Blackmore, bassist Nick Simper, keyboardist Jon Lord and drummer Ian Paice.

1885917314_1RodEvans.jpg.7aab7b41999ca9e4f27dc9351af8d8ec.jpg

2.         Who was Liza Minelli’s famous mother?

Answer = Judy Garland

Ps It’s Liza with a ‘nn’ not Lisa with a ‘n’ :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

2018498794_2Judy.jpg.d44d71cff9233a629c7a546cfc3e9d10.jpg

577094682_3Liza.jpg.427314dae07371581786b01a379364ed.jpg

3.         Which football league club used to play at Goldstone Ground?

Answer = Brighton & Hove Albion

4.         Roy Jenkins was the founder of which political party?

Answer = Liberal Democrats

464025253_4Roy.jpg.0bdf61c649c96053530bc517345b4751.jpg

5.         What type of creature is a ‘flying phalanger’?

Answer = marsupial = squirrel

Glider, also called Flying Phalanger, orFlying Possum, any of about six small phalangers—marsupial mammals of Australasia—that volplane from tree to tree like flying squirrels.

 1160658619_5marsupial.jpg.93352ac54fc59a6d425485c36824ee54.jpg

6.         What is the capital of Honduras?

Answer = H

Tegucigalpa, city and capital of the Republic of Honduras. It is located on hilly terrain hemmed in by mountains, at an elevation of 3,200 feet (975 metres) above sea level.

 

7.         What name is commonly given to the area around Stoke-on-Trent?

Answer = The Potteries – Ovalteeny lived there J

1390079192_6Potteries.jpg.d2a81a4cecf256c29baa78a1084fb6c5.jpg

 

8.         Who invented the bouncing bomb (and no, it wasn’t Bobby Ball)? Are you sure?

Answer = Barnes Wallis

222968979_8BarnesWallis.jpg.e04e755a64e590e2565084f5d9a9efc8.jpg

1141794241_8aBobbyBall2.JPG.629cc81b881924ce8e3032112a5be802.JPG

 

9.         Over what distance is the Classic horse race ‘The Oaks’ run?

Answer – 2,646 yards = 2,419.502 meters

The Oaks race day originated in England in 1779 and is the female equivalent of the Derby restricted to three year old fillies. It was named after the Surrey residence of the Earl of Derby.

 

 

10.      Who coined the phrase “a land fit for heroes to live in”?

Answer = David Lloyd George

At the end of World War One, David Lloyd George, who was then prime minister, promised to create a land fit for heroes to live in . In 1919, a new Housing Act announced plans for councils to build 500,000 new homes within three years.

10 Lloyd.jpg

11.      Which reactive metal is represented by the symbol Ba?

Answer = Barium

Now try this – A Barium meal may cause constipation or impacted stool after the procedure if it isn't completely cleared from your body. You may be told to drink plenty of fluids and eat foods high in fiber to help the rest of the barium leave your body. You may also be given a laxative to help with this.

979135949_11Barium.jpg.381cd3e9fdf9bad1f3670e89e2df75cd.jpg

12.      If Monday’s child is fair of face what is Wednesday’s child?

 

 Answer = Full of Woe

So will probably require a Barium meal :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

975437841_12Pooh.jpg.fbe3ad466a89bdd800c5a506b7481748.jpg

I’ll bet you didn’t know ….

 

Queen Elizabeth I was the first English queen to see herself in a mirror. She banned them from court as she aged.

Answer = I didn’t

8a Bobby Ball2.JPG

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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