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  • 4 months later...
46 minutes ago, Hoopzetty said:

And how about now? What do you do at home? I usually watch football, for example now my favorite is Scotland football league. There are many interesting matches and as for me it is good way to spend time..

Watch loads of football but I have to turn the volume down to 0, cam't stand the Sky 'crowd noise'. I find it's just a constant droning noise that's even worse than the commentators going on and on about pointless stats.🤓

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Welcome Hoopzetty, Still no cases in our small town so life is almost normal. Schools are going back, everyone respecting the new rules, distancing, masks where necessary, plastic barriers at checkouts. We get some football, (and hockey) I'm enjoying the lack of spectators! less diving and faking injury or playing to the crowds! different game. We are well into autumn, so gardening is high on the list, frost killing off the flowers, leaves pilling up, and I made some big changes in my garden layout ready for next year. (just now the smoke from the US fires makes it a bit unpleasant) Been out driving my old car, and working on my friends old car, he's expecting delivery of another in the next few days,(an ambulance) I'll get to tinker with it!  Visiting my wife the Lodge  has been difficult, she was is isolation for fourteen days, (ended yesterday) took her to her to her old coffee shop and she did some shopping! and oh yes been doing my housework!

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4 minutes ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Watch loads of football but I have to turn the volume down to 0, cam't stand the Sky 'crowd noise'. I find it's just a constant droning noise that's even worse than the commentators going on and on about pointless stats.🤓

Very true, especially the droning, I can tune out the commentators.

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Day 183 of isolation for me today. The house has been cleaned from top to bottom and the garden has had the overhaul of a lifetime! Every tree has been pruned, some in late spring some this month. Knowing we'd be at home through the summer we over-fertilised the lawns in an attempt to kill the moss, which has made a strong take-over bid these last few years. It's been a great success, though it has resulted in an increased need for grass cutting, 2½ hours every other day since May! This job has fallen to yours truly as the OH's skills were needed elsewhere (repairing a collapsing balcony and re-laying the patio under it). Together we have also widened the driveway by 50 cm by digging out the lawns which had grown into it over the years. We've resurfaced with 30 tons of natural gravel - all raked out by hand.

Being at home we've been more in touch with what's going on around us. We've always fed birds and squirrels (which have their very own resaraunt here) but this year I've reared a family of five who seem to have lost their mother. They've all flown the nest now but I've adopted a hedgehog instead, who moved into my OH's workshop among all the oily rags , old paint tins, dried up paint brushes and a miriad of other "things that might come in handy one day".

Then there's been mushroom and berry picking. I do this every year but I this summer  have excelled myself: 27 litres of chantrelles, 16 litres of ceps, 8 litres of wild raspberries, 16 litres of blueberries and 11 litres of "lingon". I had to look this up and it seems they are called "cowberries" in English. I've never heard this before but, on the other hand, I've never seen them in England either. The freezer's full and so is the jam shelf in the pantry.

We've only left the house three times for essential errands: collecting a passport from the police (the issuing authority), vaccination against TBE and a hospital visit for my OH: We get out and about to the surrounding forests and lakes for walking and swimming and use the telephone and Skype for family contact - we've become great grandparents for the first time so it's been used an awful lot as we are unable to visit. 

Things seem to be going well, generally speaking, for the country as a whole and we pensioners are to recieve a pension increase and a tax reduction next year, by way of thanks for staying at home!

I need a holiday!!!!

How's the situation in Bedlington today? Heard on the news today that the North East is being locked down. Must be bad when we are hearing about it here.

 

.

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1 hour ago, Canny lass said:

Day 183 of isolation for me today. The house has been cleaned from top to bottom and the garden has had the overhaul of a lifetime! Every tree has been pruned, some in late spring some this month. Knowing we'd be at home through the summer we over-fertilised the lawns in an attempt to kill the moss, which has made a strong take-over bid these last few years. It's been a great success, though it has resulted in an increased need for grass cutting, 2½ hours every other day since May! This job has fallen to yours truly as the OH's skills were needed elsewhere (repairing a collapsing balcony and re-laying the patio under it). Together we have also widened the driveway by 50 cm by digging out the lawns which had grown into it over the years. We've resurfaced with 30 tons of natural gravel - all raked out by hand.

Being at home we've been more in touch with what's going on around us. We've always fed birds and squirrels (which have their very own resaraunt here) but this year I've reared a family of five who seem to have lost their mother. They've all flown the nest now but I've adopted a hedgehog instead, who moved into my OH's workshop among all the oily rags , old paint tins, dried up paint brushes and a miriad of other "things that might come in handy one day".

Then there's been mushroom and berry picking. I do this every year but I this summer  have excelled myself: 27 litres of chantrelles, 16 litres of ceps, 8 litres of wild raspberries, 16 litres of blueberries and 11 litres of "lingon". I had to look this up and it seems they are called "cowberries" in English. I've never heard this before but, on the other hand, I've never seen them in England either. The freezer's full and so is the jam shelf in the pantry.

We've only left the house three times for essential errands: collecting a passport from the police (the issuing authority), vaccination against TBE and a hospital visit for my OH: We get out and about to the surrounding forests and lakes for walking and swimming and use the telephone and Skype for family contact - we've become great grandparents for the first time so it's been used an awful lot as we are unable to visit. 

Things seem to be going well, generally speaking, for the country as a whole and we pensioners are to recieve a pension increase and a tax reduction next year, by way of thanks for staying at home!

I need a holiday!!!!

How's the situation in Bedlington today? Heard on the news today that the North East is being locked down. Must be bad when we are hearing about it here.

 

.

Don't know about Bedlington - @John Fox (foxy) and @Jammy should.

Seghill very quiet for the 5 months. I've been watching out the window whilst Jacquie works away in the garden, without her specs so she can't tell a weed from a new flower shoot:(.

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18 hours ago, Canny lass said:

Day 183 of isolation for me today. The house has been cleaned from top to bottom and the garden has had the overhaul of a lifetime! Every tree has been pruned, some in late spring some this month. Knowing we'd be at home through the summer we over-fertilised the lawns in an attempt to kill the moss, which has made a strong take-over bid these last few years. It's been a great success, though it has resulted in an increased need for grass cutting, 2½ hours every other day since May! This job has fallen to yours truly as the OH's skills were needed elsewhere (repairing a collapsing balcony and re-laying the patio under it). Together we have also widened the driveway by 50 cm by digging out the lawns which had grown into it over the years. We've resurfaced with 30 tons of natural gravel - all raked out by hand.

Being at home we've been more in touch with what's going on around us. We've always fed birds and squirrels (which have their very own resaraunt here) but this year I've reared a family of five who seem to have lost their mother. They've all flown the nest now but I've adopted a hedgehog instead, who moved into my OH's workshop among all the oily rags , old paint tins, dried up paint brushes and a miriad of other "things that might come in handy one day".

Then there's been mushroom and berry picking. I do this every year but I this summer  have excelled myself: 27 litres of chantrelles, 16 litres of ceps, 8 litres of wild raspberries, 16 litres of blueberries and 11 litres of "lingon". I had to look this up and it seems they are called "cowberries" in English. I've never heard this before but, on the other hand, I've never seen them in England either. The freezer's full and so is the jam shelf in the pantry.

Thought ceps were mushrooms:unsure:. Lingons look familiar but don't think I have ever seen any in Uk - Google says :- 

 

Felix Lingon - Wild Lingonberry Jam 283g (Tyttebær / Puolukka)

Felix Wild Lingonberry Jam - a staple in Norway and Sweden. A must with Swedish meatballs, delicious with game and a great addition to your porridge.

We've only left the house three times for essential errands: collecting a passport from the police (the issuing authority), vaccination against TBE and a hospital visit for my OH: We get out and about to the surrounding forests and lakes for walking and swimming and use the telephone and Skype for family contact - we've become great grandparents for the first time so it's been used an awful lot as we are unable to visit. 

Confined to the house since March:closed:

Things seem to be going well, generally speaking, for the country as a whole and we pensioners are to recieve a pension increase and a tax reduction next year, by way of thanks for staying at home!

I need a holiday!!!! - room for one more? The wife could do with one:D

 

How's the situation in Bedlington today? Heard on the news today that the North East is being locked down. Must be bad when we are hearing about it here. 

1. What are the new measures?

From Friday 18th September, regulations will lawfully ban the following:

  • Residents must not socialise with other people outside of their own households in private homes and gardens
  • All hospitality for food and drink will be restricted to table service only
  • Late night restriction of operating hours will be introduced, with venues required to close between 10pm to 5am.

Residents are also advised to adhere to the following guidance to further reduce rates of infection:

  • Residents should not socialise with other people outside of their own households in all public venues.
  • Residents are advised to only use public transport for essential purposes, such as travelling to school or work
  • Holidays should be taken within your own household or support bubble
  • Residents are advised against attending amateur and semi-professional sporting events as spectators.

 

.

 

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