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Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

Bates Colliery - Blyth

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16 minutes ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

amzing hoo fate brings people tigitha!]

Shud read "Amazing"..a couldn't edit it after posting!

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3 minutes ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

Shud read "Amazing"..a couldn't edit it after posting!

HIGH PIT WILMA - did you notice Michelle had joined this group? Try a PM on this group and see if she picks it up. I can tell her via the Cambois Facebook group when you have PMed her :)

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Hi Alan, a did PM Michelle, but haven 't had a reply.. aam wondering if she is "lost" a bit! Aal try again laterAlan, gotta see ti things here..! Cheers Marra! Bill. 

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@HIGH PIT WILMA - photo posted by John Dawson on the Facebook group - Past Times History of Bates - an aerial view from Bates 1933.

I see Cambois,  Ashington & Pegswood had the same concrete structure the man in the Bates image is standing on. What exactly was this type of 'concrete tower' built for ?

 

Project3.jpg

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Hi Alan!  It was the coal washery plant tower.

All the pit's coal output went through this process,cos no coal was ever just perfectly clean coal!

When the coal was brought to "BANK"..[..The surface!],it went first to the screens,which were flat conveyor belts,where, usually,older disabled men,and young boy trainees,stood at each side of the belt,and hand-picked what stones they could,and threw them down a chute which took the stones,plus any other rubbish like pieces of damaged conveyor belt,old steel stranded haulage rope ,etc,into a waiting railway truck underneath the screens,or onto another short conveyor belt which took the waste into the big hopper which you might have seen travelling up the pit heap to be emptied at the top of the heap.

The coal was then taken by conveyor belt up and into that big round washery tower,which was full of water,being swirled around to create a vortex,like a big whirlpool,into which was added a product called "Magnatite",the purpose of this being to cause the coal to float like bits of wood,and allowing the heavier material and waste products to sink to the bottom.

In a nutshell,it was a separation plant.

Noo! ..that's the bit aa knaa,but how they retrieved the coal,and the washed out waste stones etc,without leaking water oot...is still a puzzle to me,and it's something aav nivvor thowt aboot,Alan,since the pits closed doon.

A dae remember being curious aboot the process,and asking Russel,the Shaftman/Joiner,who took me and me Son up the heedgear,ti get them excellent shots from the pit wheels,but aav forgotten noo.

A think we might find oot on Google,surely somebody has posted info of the process online!..not often HPW is stumped on mining,but I was never up there in the washery,only the plant Attendants,and maintenance men were allowed in there,due to the chemicals being used..probably.

This process was used at most "Modern"-ish pits,with the exception of the old Choppington High Pit!

Did you notice how,on your posting of the old O.S. maps of Choppington,that the "A" pit,[or "LowPit"],was drawn out with all the buildings around it,whilst the High Pit is shown as just a "dot" saying the word..."Colliery"..of little importance...!

All pits in the sight of the public main roads,were fancy girder-framed and brick-built buildings...a sign of modern industry and investment..methinks!

On the contrary,the High Pit,was sunk over the fields,out of sight to most passers-by,and was all corrugated sheet-clad,like the old shanty towns you see in the old west in the States of the early days...[ a virtual hillbilly shack type of vibe!].

Now when I started in 1959,the weather had taken it's toll on the wrinkly tin sheets,and they banged and rattled,with loose sheets flapping in the wind...and freezing in the winter,inside!

Noo,the washery there,WOULD have been modern,in it's day,and consisted of a massive flat platform,aboot 30 feet long,by aboot 8 feet wide,and which was mounted on a rolling carriage,which in turn,ran on rails.

The platform was called a "Shaker",cos it moved back and forth ,driven by a huge connecting rod and crankshaft,which was driven by a webbing belt running on a motor,like the farmers use to drive implements from the tractor auxiliary pulley.

The crankshaft throw was only aboot 3-4 feet,at the most,but when it was running,the sheer end-of-stroke,shock,as it changed the direction of the huge platform,was enough to make the whole Heapstead building move in sympathy,so if you were getting your bait,you had to hold your cup of tea in an outstretched hand, at arms-length,or you would be spilling tea over yourself...worse than the old steam tankeys![ the shaker frequency was aboot once per second..and was a violent thump..each time]

Noo wat a missed oot was,this platform had rows of various sized holes along its length,the smallest ones being nearest to where the coal was tipped onto from the tipplers above which turned the pit tubs upside doon,and tippped the load down a chute and onto the "Washer"..[which this platform was.]

At different places along the washer,the rows of holes got bigger,and bigger,and high pressure water sprays were mounted aboot  two feet above the platform,on a separate frame.

If you can visualise this,Alan,here you had this huge machine shaking violently,back and forth,aboot three feet each way,and the machine was built with a slight gradient  up-over,with a series of steel thin strips welded on the flat platform,running crossways,and aboot a foot apart,aal the way alang it's length,so as the coal was tipped on,it was shaken up the gradient on the bed,washed clean by the sprays,[pure water-no chemicals at all!],the coal "crept" up the washer,with the smaller "Nuts" falling through the smaller holes,into the railway trucks underneath,the "Singles"..[house-hold sized coal],fell through the next rows of larger holes,the "Doubles",.."Trebles",..and "Cobbles",all fell through respective holes,which was an effective way of grading the coal out..and a lot cheaper than the later washery,and environmentally friendly also!!

Finally,any larger stones which escaped the grading holes,were shaken over the edge,tipped straight onto a steel flat sheet,hand-loaded into a wheelbarrow,and wheeled around the floor past the screening belts,and tipped down a chute into the "stone " truck below.

That was a hard,thankless task for an old miner,and which had been done since the washer was installed in the early 1900's![it was like that in 1929,when my Father started up on the screens as a 14 year old miner..]

It all changed as soon as HPW had  short spells on the screens as a 15 year old trainee!

I watched this little old man every day I was up there,[cos my main job was in the timber yard],and one day,I plucked up the courage to tell the "Keeker",[Chargeman]..Jimmy Framm,a suggestion,which aa thowt he wud tell me ti....yi knaa wat!

Whey Jimmy knew,and remembered my Father well,and had taken a liking to me,cos a was a quiet hard worker,so he listened to what a had ti say.

Next thing aa knew was ,within a few days,the Blacksmiths were burning a hole in the floor where the all the stones tipped from the washer,constructing a steel chute,with the purpose of directing the tipped stones directly into the stone truck below,saving a man's wasted labour!!

Only one of my claims to being an unrecognised inventor at the pits,in my pit life!

Somebody else would always get the credit for my inventions,usually a Deputy,or or Overman,cos they were the ones that took my suggestions to the Management,to get things done and put in place...same in the furniture trade...I was robbed of credit there as well!

Not that I was going ti be paid anything,just nice to be recognised and appreciation shown!

Well Alan,I hope you are a bit wiser now,and you might have found my recollections interesting..if not tiring to read!

Cheers Alan!

Bill.

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Alan,in the Pegswood pic,you can see the railway 21-tonner,underneath the washer,being loaded with stones.

I stand to be corrected if I have given any misinformation,through ignorance of the actual process..not being experienced in the process..only what I learned in training and asking questions of those who did know and worked up there!

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Bill, a very good explanation of the coal preparation, if it was similar to the plants i'm familiar with there was another two important processes, one to recover the expensive magnetite and one to recover the fine coal washed off the screens. 

The magnetite was recovered using a large drum that was an electromagnet on one side, as it turned the magnetite clung to the upward turning of the drum but dropped off the downward side which wasn't magnetic, and recycled.

The fine coal washed off the screens was mixed with more water and an added flocculant, a chemical that created lots of bubbles when injected with compressed air, the bubbles were skimmed off and then flowed through a tank that had large wheels made up of metal mesh screen panels, large vacuum pumps sucked the fines onto the screens and then scraped off and diverted onto a conveyor then dropped into a centrifuge that spun out most of the water. All water used went to settling ponds. Not a lot of waste.

 

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9 hours ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

 

Well Alan,I hope you are a bit wiser now,and you might have found my recollections interesting..if not tiring to read!

Cheers Alan!

Bill.

Wiser, and richer Bill. I will copy & paste your response to Bill McKenna who it was asked the question :-  '

Malcolm Mckenna Wat parts of the pit was that ????
and I am positive Bill McKenna will also be wiser and richer.
Cheers Bill.
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Well,that was a fine example of pooled education!...We are aal wiser and richer  noo!.....thanks Vic for rescueing me here,a remember noo,aboot the drum,thanks to your prompting my grey matter,but aal the rest of the fascinating information aboot thi other processes are completely new to me.

A nivvor saw another improvised Washery like the one aa described that was at the High pit..when a say "Improvised" ..it's not be taken lightly!..A lot of engineering,went into thi making of that mechanical monster!

The single-throw crankshaft  was forged from steel maybe a foot thick,maybe more or a wee bit less,as was the connecting rod.

The bearing saddles had to be massive also,to withstand the forward/reverse motion,and inertia which was sufficient to move the whole of the screens and upper heapstead,where all the tipplers and creepers were..and which were all built on heavy girder stilts.

The platform weighed a canny few tons,and danced back and forward as if it were a kids toy.

Noo! We stood wi wor backs to this moving and rackety deafening monster,with a gangway separating the sreening belts,only aboot

four feet wide,so if yi fell backwards,which ye med sure yi didn't,ye wud hae ya arms tekking off by the carriage wheels which ran on rolleyway rails,and which went completely unguarded from installation,until Old Jimmy,the oiler and greaser,got trapped in the moving machinery,sustaining fatal injuries...then within hours of Jimmy's death,the Blacksmiths,engineers,and senior management,were all up there installing guard handrails aal aroond the washer,before

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Whey,me comment posted by itsell afore a was finished,and when a tried ti edit by adding more text,it wadn't save,so me detailed description of the screens and heapstead was wiped..!

The last sentence above should read as: " ....before the Government inspectors and Area Director and Safety in Mines People aal came ti the pit"

The next night's Evening Chronicle read ..." a safety guard rail has since been erected aound the machinery..."

Just came to me,they have the same steel-plated four foot wide flat conveyor  belts on the screens at Beamish museum,the only other place where I have seen these deadly peices of machinery,deadly, cos the plates used to get bent up with hard bits of stone becoming trapped in the guides,and sharp, long bits of swarf edge spikes used to rip your hands and arms,as they were concealed under the load of wet coal and stone slurry on the belt.

Malcom Mckenna,the washery tower looks like a giant ice cream cornet..whey, a bit like one..!

Thanks again Vic for helping me oot!

Cheers Alan!

Bill.

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Bill, those flat conveyors were called "Flight conveyors" yes very often unguarded and quite deadly, usually left unguarded for operator convenience to enable unplugging. =($ PRODUCTION!)

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@HIGH PIT WILMA - posted on the Friends of Bates Colliery Facebook group by  Trevor Gregg : - ' 

Here is a photo I took from the top of the No 3 Shaft Headgear on a cold but beautiful winters day'

 

Trevor didn't specify a date.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

From No Shaft 3 Headgear by Trevor Gregg.jpg

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WOW!! THAT is a stunner!...yi wadn't cud imagine the scene aa tuk on a summer's neet,[ interesting but pretty dull to the uninitiated eye!],ti turn into a beautiful scene like this...wad ye noo?...but this pic should be on a mining calendar...if it isn't aalriddy![It's a lovely January month pic!]

Me youngest Son used ti gaan extreme exploring,and a lot of it was doon the aad Lead,Fluorspar,Flourite,etc,mines from the 1700's..owa Weardale and places like that.

Noo the Mine Explorer Society,had calendars printed,composed of pictures each month,and chosen from the Members' pics.

Me Son had one of his pics published,and they were aal stunners,so aam wondering if any Coalmining calendars are printed from pics of wor pits.

Alan,please pass my comments of appreciation to Trevor,for posting this gorgeous shot of a bygone age!

Vic,thanks for your comments aboot the flat conveyor belts.Mind ,aam puzzled as ti wat ye mean by "Unplugging"..regarding a conveyor belt?

Also,a think ye might have got me wrong wi me poor description of the screen belts at Choppington high pit.

AFC belts were "Armoured,Flexible, Conveyor", belts,and the abreviated description applied ti all steel flexible conveyors.

My very first encounter with an Armoured Steel Conveyor belt,were the ones that I described up on the screens at the High Pit,unlike any other screen belts at aal thi other its I worked at,and visited.

When I say "Flat",I mean exactly that...flat steel plates,on a four feet wide belt,with each 4'long by 12" wide plate,overlapping it's neighbouring plate by a couple of inches,like the plates on a slatey beetle's back...or an armadillo.....!

No "Flight" bars as in AFC belts in the years of mechanisation..[the term AFC came to be accepted as "ARMOURED FACE CONVEYOR",in later years]....just a completely flat moving conveyor belt..[like the moving pavements in the new Asda superstores to take trolleys and Customers to the upper level].

Now when one of those pates got a smaal stone trapped in the guides,it buckled the plate,which screamed like a  wailing banshee..and when it went around the head-end,the sparks flew like hell and slivers of sharpsteel like thin knives used ti come aroond on the next revolution of the belt..deadly as hell.

My next encounter with an AFC,was when I started underground,on heavy transport,with a pony,tekking everything steel inbye,or bringing gear outbye that had ti gaan ti bank.

The Overman sent me in to a coal face,ti seek two "Panzer pans"....a sed Whaat?!...The pan sections were from the face conveyor,and were made by a German Company called "Panzer"...mebbe the same company that made the Tanks and guns during the War.

Noo they were a minaiture version of the big Crawley AFC's,which we got in later years at other pits,but not High Pit!

The Panzer belts were aboot 16-18 inches wide,with trapped "Flight" bars,spaced aboot two feet apart,and which were snaked into the new face track by the "Pullers",using the deadly old "Sylvester" pulling device.

At Bedlington aad pit,in the High Main seam,they used 61AM flexible "PAN" section belts,which had high spill plates,and no guides to trap the "Flight" bars..completely open pans,and which had to be laid as flat on the ground as possible,the slightest rise at the head-end which wasn't graded properly...and the chain and bars just flew up out of the pans,and lashed around wildly,due to the tension put upon the chain,by the motor head.

At Bates,we used the same type of belt,but it was a heavier duty version,called the 61W,and the term "Flight" bars,was a misnomer,cos the correct term was "Flyght" bars,made by the same company who made the "Flyght" pumps,["DALEKS"...ti thi pitmen!],which can be seen in my Bates pics in the gallery.

So when "Flyght" belts came into thi pits,in the early years,the "Flyght" bar system came to be universally accepted and referred to,on every flexible belt that had bars!...the 61W and 61AM,belts ran with a single centre chain,with the bars mounted like wings,on the chain.

The small Panzer,AND the larger "Crawley",belts,had two chains,one each side,with the bars connected to each side chain with a "Kidney" link.

SO!!..Vic,ti clear up in my mind,which system were you referring to,when ye say "Flight " conveyors,cos the screens at the High Pit,didn't have "Flight/Flyght"..bars at all...completely flat!...and they weren't referred to as anything but the "Screen belts"...["the belts with no name"...!]

As I said earlier,[a think!],the only other place aav seen these belts,is at Beamish Museum,up on the screens there,cos the guide was fascinated when aa started telling him aboot the dangers of them,cos HE hadn't actually seen them working...he just got the job,and with a bit of training,he was gud at he's job,but didn't have hands on experience !

Aa wondered if they came from Choppington,and a wud luv ti knaa if there was any other pits,even in Durham,that used them.

Maybe in the old days aal pits had them,and maybe it was just that the High Pit hadn't been modernised,wi being a little tetty pit!

A speak from me aan experiences,wi nae references from books or owt else,so a stand ti be corrected if aav had a severe memory lapse and aid thi wrang things!!

Cheers to ye Vic,and Alan,and Trevor,and aam wondering what's happened to Canny Lass,and Maggie...been off the Radar a while?

Bill.

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As an afterthought,studying this luvly scene...notice the cloud of moisture condensing as it escapes from the Ventilation Fan Duct Funnel!

90% of that would be coming from the Three-Quarter Seam..where the water from the seabed teemed in constantly,and where everything just seized up over a weekend,on the coalfaces,all of Vic's electrical switchgear,panels,Shearer handles,etc,if there were no Electricians working over the weekend,on maintenance duties,...it was so humid,you could see the moisture droplets in the air like fine dust,in the beam of your caplamp.

OH!..and the other 10% would be from me...sweating..after cutting the coal with the trusty old-fashioned coal-cutter,drilling it with the trusty old "Huwood" driller..firing it down,and then filling 24 tons of coal,and wet stones,onto an old ,old,old-fashioned "rubber"[!]conveyor face belt,using even older-fashioned big "Pan" "Filler's" shovels..["Shuul's"]....in a pit ,[right up to the day that thatcher--the-hatcheter,gave the order to pull out],that left two £30 million-pound Dosco Road-header driving machines of the latest Technlogy,in the "Plessey" Seam!

Two vastly contrasting methods of winning out new roadways and coalfaces at the same pit,in different seams!!

Cheers again! Bill.

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5 hours ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

 

5 hours ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

Vic,thanks for your comments aboot the flat conveyor belts.Mind ,aam puzzled as ti wat ye mean by "Unplugging"..regarding a conveyor belt?

Also,a think ye might have got me wrong wi me poor description of the screen belts at Choppington high pit.

SO!!..Vic,ti clear up in my mind,which system were you referring to,when ye say "Flight " conveyors,cos the screens at the High Pit,didn't have "Flight/Flyght"..bars at all...completely flat!...and they weren't referred to as anything but the "Screen belts"...["the belts with no name"...!]

Bill, Flight conveyors are usually two parallel driven chains connected with "flights", steel plates that drag / scrape the coal along to a chute that the coal drops into, (this coal is the fine wet coal that has been recovered, (not lumps) if the chute gets blocked or “plugged” the operator would try and unplug it (with his shuul) while it was running rather than stopping the conveyor and bring the whole operation to a halt.(centrifuges ,belts, screens and filters). No not AFC belts or related to the Flygt pump company,( I hated those pumps!)

Vic

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14 hours ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

WOW!! THAT is a stunner!...yi wadn't cud imagine the scene aa tuk on a summer's neet,[ interesting but pretty dull to the uninitiated eye!],ti turn into a beautiful scene like this...wad ye noo?...but this pic should be on a mining calendar...if it isn't aalriddy![It's a lovely January month pic!]

Me youngest Son used ti gaan extreme exploring,and a lot of it was doon the aad Lead,Fluorspar,Flourite,etc,mines from the 1700's..owa Weardale and places like that.

Noo the Mine Explorer Society,had calendars printed,composed of pictures each month,and chosen from the Members' pics.

Me Son had one of his pics published,and they were aal stunners,so aam wondering if any Coalmining calendars are printed from pics of wor pits.

Alan,please pass my comments of appreciation to Trevor,for posting this gorgeous shot of a bygone age!

 

@HIGH PIT WILMA - passed your comments on to Trevor:)

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Thanks a lot Alan!.. noo aam wondering whoo aal us buggaas wud manage here.. if ye fluke the coop..!!! Cheers, Al. (lukking forward ti a reply from Wor Vic noo!.. just ti settle my mind on the differences in pit terminology!) 

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On 22/09/2019 at 22:40, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

As an afterthought,studying this luvly scene...notice the cloud of moisture condensing as it escapes from the Ventilation Fan Duct Funnel!

90% of that would be coming from the Three-Quarter Seam..where the water from the seabed teemed in constantly,and where everything just seized up over a weekend,on the coalfaces,all of Vic's electrical switchgear,panels,Shearer handles,etc,if there were no Electricians working over the weekend,on maintenance duties,...it was so humid,you could see the moisture droplets in the air like fine dust,in the beam of your caplamp.

OH!..and the other 10% would be from me...sweating..after cutting the coal with the trusty old-fashioned coal-cutter,drilling it with the trusty old "Huwood" driller..firing it down,and then filling 24 tons of coal,and wet stones,onto an old ,old,old-fashioned "rubber"[!]conveyor face belt,using even older-fashioned big "Pan" "Filler's" shovels..["Shuul's"]....in a pit ,[right up to the day that thatcher--the-hatcheter,gave the order to pull out],that left two £30 million-pound Dosco Road-header driving machines of the latest Technlogy,in the "Plessey" Seam!

Two vastly contrasting methods of winning out new roadways and coalfaces at the same pit,in different seams!!

Cheers again! Bill.

@HIGH PIT WILMA - the only response from Trevor Gregg after I posted your comments was :- 

 

Trevor Gregg
Trevor Gregg_ZvGTxrlsmm.png Yes I remember the 3/4 well, pulling white coated dried up boots from my locker then coating them with boot grease before going underground

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Heh heh!... boots!.. they used to dry oot and curl up at the toes... and covered in the white salt deposits... ye cudn't get them on.. we used ti either wet them under the shower.. or if ye were late for clocking in ye had ti painfully squeeze ya feet in, waak aal hobbly.. and gaan ootside and get a diddle on them... owt ti just get them comfortable! Vic, noo a knaa wat ye mean, doon the pit, whe n discussing conveyors, we just used a "Colloquial" term like either a "Rubber" or a "Chyne" (Chain) belt... we knew it wasn't Rubber, and we knew somebody might mean a 61W,rather than a Crawley afc, sometimes it wasn't important, just general conversation... so aye, a flight belt meks sense! The Dalek. (Flyght), pumps were the best thing since sliced bread, for shifting waata quickly, for us lads, but were they a sod ti repair, Vic? 

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@HIGH PIT WILMA - Trevor posted another winter shot on the Facebook group and I added your photo to it. Trevor responded with :-
Trevor Gregg
Trevor Gregg_ZvGTxrlsmm.png Excellent, Russell Hogg ex Joiner who became a Shaftsman and after Bates became a Shaftsman at Ashington working for me.
 

Project5.png

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Waatcheor Alan ,once again,a big thanks for ya untiring work  in mekking the world a smaaler place!

This is incredible! Another luvly shot in winter..a bet it was caad up there,it was a summer's neet when Russell tuk me Son and Me up.

A hope Trevor and Russell hook up through the power of the Net!,young Adam is boond ti see thi pics..if he still comes on the forums that is...

Cheers Alan!

Bill.

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On 22/09/2019 at 23:22, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

aam wondering what's happened to Canny Lass,and Maggie...been off the Radar a while?

Having a rough year HPW. Hubby had a brain haemorrhage, just days before Christmas, which was caused by a fall in September. The head injury caused a long slow bleed which was successfully operated on but left him with epilepsi. This has caused loads of problems - not least the loss of his driving licence. Living as we do (in the 'wilds of wanny', as the saying goes) two cars and two drivers are a necessity. This has meant a) lots of time sitting around in hospitals and b) lots of time sitting behind a driving wheel, neither of which are favourite pass-times of mine.

There hasn't been much time to sit down at a computer but, be assured, I try to 'pop-in' a couple of times a week on my mobile (usually in a waiting room somewhere!) and read the site. However, I don't find this medium practical for writing so I haven't been able to respond to so many posts.

There is light at the end of the tunnel, however. The seizures are under control and the last brain scan, 4 weeks ago, shows that his brain is back in the centre of his head where it should be. All good news! Hopefully after a year without seizures he will be able to drive again and life will return to normal for us both.

Edited by Canny lass
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Nice to see your coping CL and things are improving, we are having similar problems here in GC, luckily my health is the better of the two of us and hopefully things will improve, like yourself living rather remotely adds another dimension to growing old. Wishing your hubby a full recovery and return to normal ageing! if there is such a thing!

Regards, Vic

 

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5 hours ago, Canny lass said:

There is light at the end of the tunnel, however. The seizures are under control and the last brain scan, 4 weeks ago, shows that his brain is back in the centre of his head where it should be. All good news! Hopefully after a year without seizures he will be able to drive again and life will return to normal for us both.

All the best to the both of you.:)

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      The Northern League Division Two club is home to seven teams and over 80 footballers from senior players to an under 6 ‘tots’ team. Along with daily training sessions and match attendances, the club sees hundreds of people visiting the ground on a weekly basis therefore the defibrillator has been very well received by all.
      Rowan Edwards, Commercial Director of Bedlington Terriers FC, commented, “This is a vital piece of first aid equipment and we are extremely grateful to Lynemouth Power Station for their kind donation. Given the number of on-site staff, players training each week and visitors to the ground, it is essential that our trained staff have instant access to life-saving equipment in case of emergencies. It will mean a lot to everyone here at the club as well as the local community, so we’re very grateful for the power station’s support.”
      Janet Mole from Lynemouth Power Station added, “Having these devices installed in popular public places and venues is so important, so rather than just donate to the fundraising effort, we decided to purchase the equipment outright on behalf of the club. As a local employer, it is important that community initiatives like this are well supported so we’re delighted to hand over the defibrillator to all at the club.”

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