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Roundabout rant

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Can anyone explain to me the logic behind the design of the roundabouts such as the one by the police station on Schalksmuhle Rd, and particularly the new installation at the entrance to the new estate being build on the way out to Nedderton? They are clearly meant to have a single lane but the surface of the roundabout is wide enough for two, with the inner park block paved but flat to the road, and the outer part tarmac.

Is the inner part for decoration or for traffic use? I genuinely don't know what bit I'm supposed to drive on outside the police station.

My observation so far is that its roughly 50/50 on the latest roundabout despite the white lines which presumably indicate that you should keep off the block paving.

If you aren't meant to go over the middle surely it should be built up - as it stands it will end up with the middle part sinking unevenly into ruts as traffic goes over it and it will look awful in a few years like the one near Woodhorn off the end of the spine road.

Just one of the many ridiculous roundabout designs cropping up in Northumberland in the last few years (such as the one on the new estate between Laverock Farm and Blyth South Beach).

 

 

 

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If only I had just said - yes, the bricked area is there to be used.

Instead I wondered, is there info in the highway code or anywhere else that a simple Google search will reveal?

Oh to be a Technical author! I believe the simple explanation is something like :- a single lane road that requires a roundabout to allow access to and from the road may require an additional lane, only on the roundabout, that allows large vehicles additional space (another lane) to turn on and off the single lane road.

But if you really want to impress your fellow Friday night ale tasters with a full explanation of the Geometric Design of Roundabouts then read the 51 pages in this documnet :-  http://www.standardsforhighways.co.uk/ha/standards/dmrb/vol6/section2/td1607.pdf

 

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OK I get the justification for two lanes but why have two different surfaces? If it was just tarmac for the whole road surface it would be obvious that you could use it all.

The new roundabout also (if I recall correctly) has a solid white line around the bricked area which would suggest to me that the bricked area is not part of the road surface.

Just seems unnecessarily confusing, although I have heard of road schemes in town centres (on the continent) that are deliberately vague with the intention of making people think more about what they are doing and take more care rather than using autopilot and paying less attention.

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Eggy!!!....you sod!!....they used tactics like that document to torture prisoners in days gone by!!!

I now think I better stay off the road,after reading a page and a haaf,cos noo aa daein't knaa one bliiddy roondie from anitha!!

FIFTY ONE PAGES!!!.....heh heh!!!!!!

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56 minutes ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

Eggy!!!....you sod!!....they used tactics like that document to torture prisoners in days gone by!!!

I now think I better stay off the road,after reading a page and a haaf,cos noo aa daein't knaa one bliiddy roondie from anitha!!

FIFTY ONE PAGES!!!.....heh heh!!!!!!

Couldn't believe it when that document turned up!! There's a similar roundabout on the outskirts of Seaton Delaval

Roundabouts.jpg

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It was explained to me in my motorbike lessons like this: the clue is in the title - roundabout - you go around it on the road, the block paving is always red meaning stop, don't drive over that bit. They need it like that for trucks & buses.

Simple really!

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The Lidl mini-roundabout on Schalksmuhle Road is a nightmare... although it may be that it is all the drivers who do not appear to have a clue about giving way that causes the problems. There is often a Mexican standoff that then ends up as a dangerous free for all.    

 

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just pleased i now have a dash cam fitted because alot of drivers seem unaware of the mini roundabout at Lidl and just go straight over without stopping,amazed there's been no accidents yet 

Edited by rosco
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