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Found another school photo. Today's teachers would not entertain a class this size - 43 pupils.

Think this one is 1954 or 1955. If I could remember the teacher, and what class she taught - 1st - 2nd or 3rd then I would know the year.

post-3031-0-67693500-1374524967_thumb.pn

Back Row

Robert Ramsay – Eric Tielman? – Dennis? - ? – Ray Dickson? – Brian Trench – Ronny? – Hugh? - ? – Clark Mole – Rob Dixon? - ? – Alan Edgar - ?Robertson

Girls

? - ? - ? - ? Eileen? – Jean? - ? - ? -? - ? - ? - ? - ?

? - ? - ? - ? - ? Mrs/Miss? - ? - ? -? - ? - ?

Sitting

Brian Davison - ? - ? - ? ---------- ? – David Aisbtt? - ? – Ian Arkle?

Back Row - Fourth from left = Barry?

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Blimey, I've just been to my local Tesco megastore and discovered you can still get bags of dried 'farter peas' (labelled 'Marrowfat Peas').. Read the instructions and it's the same as Granny used to do only they say to plop-in a teaspoon of bicarb for the soak; Nan was much more efficient ... she use a bicarb tab.

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It seems Mandelson asked for some guacamole at a fish and chip shop when he was an MP up here.

Mushy peas with steak and kidney pud and chips.

What a delicacy!

Back to basics

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Found another school photo. Today's teachers would not entertain a class this size - 43 pupils.

Think this one is 1954 or 1955. If I could remember the teacher, and what class she taught - 1st - 2nd or 3rd then I would know the year.

post-3031-0-67693500-1374524967_thumb.pn

Back Row

Robert Ramsay – Eric Tielman? – Dennis? - Barry Hicks? – Ray Dickson? – Brian Trench – Ronny? – Hugh? - ? – Clark Mole – Rob Dixon? - ? – Alan Edgar - Alex Robertson?

Girls

? - ? - ? - ? Eileen? – Jean? - ? - ? -? - ? - ? - ? - ?

? - ? - ? - ? - ? Mrs/Miss? - ? - ? -? - ? - ?

Sitting

Brian Davison - ? - ? - ? ---------- ? – David Aisbtt? - ? – Ian Arkle?

Added Barry Hicks & Alex Robertson - both with '?' Edited by Eggy1948

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Picture of the Barrington Cricket team in 1946. I think the two Scott's brothers lived in Office Row.

I also seem to recall the brothers having a proper quoit pitch behind the coal cree's. The peg target was in wet cement, which must have been covered up after every game. We never had any outdoor quoits, so I never really played the game. I assume they must have played for money, or maybe there was even a league.

post-2446-0-89632900-1378045649_thumb.jp

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I was thinking about that last post I did and the ref to baked beans; on reflection I can't recall having many baked beans as a kid but do remember 'farter' peas. Many here will remember these beasts ... dried peas left to soak overnight, with a bicarb of soda tablet chucked-in for good measure - the peas would be cooked as part of the meal the next day.

Would that be what we call "Steepy peas" ?

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Heres a cracking old pic. From our area and Barrington we have Redpath.

East Northumberland School Cup Team circa 1920.

You may have a relation on here.

East Northumberland Schools Team c 1920

Back row players include Graham (Ashington), Arkle (Ashington), Brewis (Choppington), Redpath (Barrington), & Armstrong (North Seaton). Back row officials (teachers and masters) include Smythe, H.R. Maxie, T. Embelton, & Leathard. Middle row includes T. Armstrong (Seaton Delaval), J. Nicholson (Choppington), & H. Wake (Seaton Delaval). Front row includes James (North Seaton), Dale (Bedlington), & J. McMillan (Seaton Delaval).

post-1337-0-76563100-1378138667_thumb.jp

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Yep John ... my Granny always called them "Steepy Peas" - farters is what us lads called them. I don't think I would have dared to call them farter peas in front of my Granny.

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Yep John ... my Granny always called them "Steepy Peas" - farters is what us lads called them. I don't think I would have dared to call them farter peas in front of my Granny.

Ye they were good for "farting" When the silent ones slipped out in the classroom what a laugh it was :whistle:

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how wonderful it is to read of barrington and find out it was farted away is a pure gas !! lol

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barrington1.jpg

Barrington football team, 1947?

Rafie - my mate Ralph Lowe says his brother is on this photo and he will be seeing him in 3-4 weeks time so should be able to put some names to picture. He also thinks he has seen this one in A Cree Full of Coal, with names.

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Cympil/BartonRafie/EdAdey/and anyone that's interested

That painting of Barrington School posted by Cympil  13 February 2010 has had me thinking, and occasionally checking, since I joined this site this year.  Yesterday I got an email of a mate, brother of John Lowe an ex Barrington lad born in the 1930s, and they had seen the painting on a BBC site.

Turns out on the site - http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/paintings has 25 paintings of James Mackenzie and from the titles of the paintings he lived in Alexander Road and from the number of paintings of the Bedlington 'A' pit that's where he worked. The info on the BBC site is:- James Mackenzie 1927 – 2013 and states that his works are either displayed at Beamish Open Air Museam or Woodhorn Museum & Northumberland Archives.

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The titles of the paintings are:-

Barrington Colliery

Back to Stables, Bedlington 'A' Pit

Barrington Colliery School

Bedlington 'A' Pit, Plessey Seam

Filler, Bedlington 'A' Pit, Harvey Seam

Putters Riding Ponies, Bedlington 'A' Pit, Northumberland

'Bill's Been Hurt', 19 Alexandra Row, Barrington Colliery, Northumberland, 1933                                                    

Bill's Been Hurt  (2 paintings on the same subject)

(The artist said about this piece: "My father [being] brought home after been under a fall at Bedlington 'A' Pit. Head injuries, two finger ends off and back fractured.

Still dirty and delivered in the colliery coal cart. He was a hewer piece worker. [i am] the small boy on the left with the iron gourd. Old Mrs Cook hurrying down to help, she assisted everyone.")

Down the Barrington Burn

Breaking in the Riding Cob, Barrington Stables

Howicking Preparing Leeks on Show Day, Alexandra Road, Barrington

Jack Arkle at the Pigeons, Alexandra Road, Barrington

Choppington Flower Show, £50 Professional Handicap Race

Back Canch Man, Bedlington 'A' Pit

Calling the Weigh

End of Shift, Bathing at 19 Alexandra Road

Loading ponies into a cage at horse hole at Bedlington 'A' Pit,

Miner's Still Life

Paddy Gets a Rabbit

Quiet, While the Bread Rises

Rabbit Coursing, Bell's Field, 1934

(The artist said about this piece: "Held on Saturday afternoons with whippet dogs and live rabbits. My brother Foster and self collected the live rabbits in a pigeon basket early on Saturday mornings at Choppington Station (Northumberland) and carried them to the field.)

Shaft Inspectors - Inspecting the shaft at Bedlington 'A' Pit, Northumberland.

The Busty Kip Collecting Jockies and Pushing around to the Shaft

Washing Day

'You Haven't Lost Your Touch Bill'

 

The site also allows you to print of the pictures. But does state:-

Printing

Print the painting page (low resolution) with painting information

If you click on these links you'll get to print the page on your own printer.

Other uses

If you want to license images or use them for any other purpose, you will need to contact the gallery or collection directly.

Edited by Eggy1948

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I lived in no 14 0ffice row until I got married.There were 17 houses in the street.Starting at 17 the families were Audsley .Easton/ Scott/ Dickson /Beldon/ Scot/ Allison/ B

loom/ Godsmark/ Dixon/ Marshall/ White/ Lowe/ Neal/ Hunter / I/m afraid my memory let's me down on the last 2 .

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there were 2 sets of Arkles in Alexander Row .Ronnie and Alan were both very good footballers .Ron now lives in

guidepost. The other Arkles had Morris a few years older but a canny hand. There's a photo of him and Rex Parker in the same team at Choppington Welfare.

musn/t forget Jimmy /Tot/ Dodds from Victoria Row a

Barn/ton stalwart

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In reply to the Routledges

Buildings article I lived in Parsons Cottage next to the

School origin/ly the stewards house when the land was

being cleared of forest.There was also Brewery behind

Stan Todd's pub in Victorian times called Whites Barrington Brewery.I used to get a complimentary

Cinema ticket off Stan for delivering his chronicle.

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I lived in no 14 0ffice row until I got married.There were 17 houses in the street.Starting at 17 the families were Audsley .Easton/ Scott/ Dickson /Beldon/ Scot/ Allison/ B

loom/ Godsmark/ Dixon/ Marshall/ White/ Lowe/ Neal/ Hunter / I/m afraid my memory let's me down on the last 2 .

Alan - and old Barrington source, that wishes to remain anonymous, says the last two could be:- 

Gibbons - mended the potts! and Pollard.

 

And then wandering away from the actual Offfice row question they said :-

"House through the gateway was Ronnie Cook and Bob Crackett" and then the conversation went off in another direction.

Edited by Eggy1948

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My world was lang pit rows .with ootside Nettie's.

Pigeon crees and garden tetties.Men Gannon to work

Wearing auld cloth caps.

Fetching wettor from outside taps.Jinny/ Mary/ Hannah/ May

WOR some of the names of every day.

Kids riding around on ramshackle bikes

Dorty angels raggy arsed tykes.

Nobody had out we wor aal the same

Could/nt tell the difference except for the name.

A divvent regret these times have past

Its just that whey man

They wor the last.

Part of a poem I wrote years ago which I. thought apt for this topic

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My world was lang pit rows .with ootside Nettie's.

Pigeon crees and garden tetties.Men Gannon to work

Wearing auld cloth caps.

Fetching wettor from outside taps.Jinny/ Mary/ Hannah/ May

WOR some of the names of every day.

Kids riding around on ramshackle bikes

Dorty angels raggy arsed tykes.

Nobody had out we wor aal the same

Could/nt tell the difference except for the name.

A divvent regret these times have past

Its just that whey man

They wor the last.

Part of a poem I wrote years ago which I. thought apt for this topic

I like that. You didn't loose your Penka doon Double Raa did ye?

 

Did the names Gibbons & Potts fit in with your memory of the occupants of the first two house in Office Row? Just so I can tell the 'ageds' they were right or wrong.   

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The name Gibbons rings a bell but the other might be Gales.

Have in my possession a photo of Barnt/n fancy dress competition Gala circa 1950_but can/t put hands on it.

Bobby Ramsey is right at front dressed as African warrior with spear in hand.

Geordie Adey etc many others in photo

Will download when found.

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Rhonda Richardson went ti the Bomar pit,then when it closed ,he went ti Bedlington A pit [thi AAD PIT!].

He was feared by a lot of the old-timers doon thi pit,and aav seen them put their bait back in their bait-bags,and get up and gaan back on thi face,cos ...."howway,thi Black Prince's coming in...."[Rhonda 's nickname...most gaffa's had nicknames in them days!],aa had many a standy-up battle wi Rhonda.[he was a strict,feared,overman,but was dedicated ti trying ti mek thi pit survive a threatened closure,in the mid-60's!!]

My gud aad marra used ti live in Barnt'n village,in the 1940's-till the hooses were pulled doon..aal see wat a can find oot aboot thi Thomson family,and report back,cos he canna use the computer.

Edited by HIGH PIT WILMA

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