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I used to know quite a lot of people living in this Row as I used to deliver newspapers for Mr Ward from Scotland Gate all around Barrington.

That must be Brian Ward the newsagent ? Lovely family they are. Don't know if Brian is still around. I aint seen his son Kenneth neither for a few years. He took the business over at Guide Post, The Square, and when they moved into the post office i think they sold up. I just aint seen any of them for a few years really.

I delivered papaers at Guide Post for them back in the 60s when at school.

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Rafie - read the quotes and unless I missed it the kids in the photo were not named by anyone.

Check out the photo (I have shrank it a bit cos it was massive) and see if you recognise the names added, not by me, by a lad in the photo:-

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I knew Cliffy Hunter and his family, John his son, knocked about with me. They moved from Barnton to Guide Post Morpeth Road estate. Alan and Geordie Dickson, do you remember them two lads ?

As a kid we went over to the old clay pit to knock about and the tip to shoot vermine. Not just vermine, but anything. Remember shooting out the face of an old grandfather clock one day. Think i should have taken it, worth a few bob these days.

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When we moved to Newbiggin to a colliery house in 1969 Oswald Road had the Lofts all connected in common and I recall a scandal in the Early 80,s when a lad who lived up the street started watching people leaving the house and then dropping from the loft to rob them, the stupid buggar left dorty prints aal ower the loft hatches so the police knew how it was being done and put a watch out til he was caught, I believe when he got out, the neighbors got hold of him and took their justice out of his hide

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The lad sitting between Catherine and Jean was Alan Jarvis. I think the lad between Robin and Derek was called Turner, but I could be wrong.

About that time there was an influx of new pupils to the Barrington School from the Oval, Station. This was the result of families moving from the pit rows at Choppington to much more luxury lifestyle in the Oval.

Picture updated with the two names - Alan Jarvis & (Turner?) and picture added to gallery.

Rafie your comment on the influx of pupils to Barrington could be the answer to the question I have asked many for years and years - 'Why did our family, from Coquetdale Place, behind the Oval Shops, go to Barrington and not Bedlington Station?' As fas as I can recall (and probably wrong) we were the only family from Coquetadle that went to Barrington. There were people from Waverley Ave, Roy Batchelor ? & Steadlands Tom, Rob & Harry Dixon ? that went to Barrington. My eldest brother, borth 1946 would have started Barrington in August 1950. We moved in to Coquetdale, from Beatty Road, in either winter 1948 or Spring 1949. So our family moving from Topend catchment area to Station catchment area could have coincided with the much more 'airey' houses influx from Choppington. Even if it is not totally true I can now say it is rather than - nee idea mate' as I have for the past 20 years. Thank you Rafie.

ps. just Google street viewed the Oval area and Coquetdale place, although in the pics, is not named. Had to input Waverley Drive to get the map. Perhaps it was all just a dream and me mam was right -'your in your own little world lad, day dreaming away'.

post-3031-0-73889500-1372707135_thumb.pn

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when i lived in Bolam Place in 1950 i went to Barrington but in 1952 we moved to Waverley Ave .and i had go to BEDLINGTON Station.

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Can anyone remember the practice of "putting the coal†into the coal Cree's for pocket money. The free coal arrived and was dumped in a heap, close to the Cree. Certain families could not put the coal in and relied upon the local lads (junior school) for this task, which they got paid for. I was never involved with this business, nor did I try to muscle in. It was enough to put our own coal in. I was never aware of any hassle, with this pocket money business, but I do suspect that if anyone was daft enough to try you may get spoken to.

Incidentally, there was no police station/depot at Barrington. We had a visit maybe once a week with police on a bike from Bedlington. But we did have colliery police, but I am not sure how effective he was. Because of statement we used to use "you got a better job as a colliery policeâ€, in other words he had a very cushy job.

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when school finished in the afternoon at guidepost on the way home i would fill the coal into the shed to get some money so i could go to the humford baths . by the way my freinds did as well .they were good days.

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Can anyone remember the practice of "putting the coal†into the coal Cree's for pocket money. The free coal arrived and was dumped in a heap, close to the Cree. Certain families could not put the coal in and relied upon the local lads (junior school) for this task, which they got paid for. I was never involved with this business, nor did I try to muscle in. It was enough to put our own coal in. I was never aware of any hassle, with this pocket money business, but I do suspect that if anyone was daft enough to try you may get spoken to.

Incidentally, there was no police station/depot at Barrington. We had a visit maybe once a week with police on a bike from Bedlington. But we did have colliery police, but I am not sure how effective he was. Because of statement we used to use "you got a better job as a colliery policeâ€, in other words he had a very cushy job.

Certainly can sir and I see The Lone Ranger did it as well. A couple of days ago I updated the entry 'creeful of coal' in the 'Chat Central' Forum with this :-

A creeful of coal is how we made money when we were kids, shuvelling in the coal for 2 bob - Pioneer Terrace was easy shuvelling straight into the cree via the trap door at the back. Coquedale place was hard work, for me, shuvel into wheel barrow; up the path (sometimes steps) then, unless the cree was empty, tip the barrow then shuvel the coal into the cree!

That was the only way we got pocket money and your comment Rafie about not muscling in on other kids territory does seem to stick in my mind. I think if a new kid asked the owner of the coal if they could shuvel it in they were told no, we have someone who does it.

These days you would get undercut on the price!

Edited by Eggy1948

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We shovelled coal as well. There was a lorry that came round and had three or four flaps either side. The coal man would tilt the wagon and empty the coal onto the kerb, then you would have to shovel it into the coalhouse - sometimes using a wheelbarrow. The best time to make money was in the winter when the old folk didn't want to do it. I think we got thruppence or sixpence for doing it.

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Keith, your comment about the old folk, made me starting thinking. The only retired people I can remember were the Phillipson's who lived at the top of office row. He was an ex pit manager and according to my mum the coal they received was a better quality. After that my brain is dead, about old folk living at Barrington.

I don't think there was a huge data base of people wanting to have their coals put in. Remember every house in the row's had family of several children, with at least one lad of capable of putting the coal in. But clearly some families wanted this service, but the numbers would not be large.

The lads would know these clients and know when the coal would be delivered. I suspected they would sort out the arrangements during the school dinner time. I also understand they put several coals in on the same day, so pay could be attractive.

My hunch is the lads pennies, would sub-element the family living, rather than to be used as pocket money. Remember they put-in several loads, so the pay could be attractive. But I could be completely wrong, but good luck to them at least they were prepared to work.

PS: I never saw of them wearing anything from Marcus Price. Wow that is shop from the past !!!

Edited by Barton Rafie

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Keith, your comment about the old folk, made me starting thinking. The only retired people I can remember were the Phillipson's who lived at the top of office row. He was an ex pit manager and according to my mum the coal they received was a better quality. After that my brain is dead, about old folk living at Barrington.

I don't think there was a huge data base of people wanting to have their coals put in. Remember every house in the row's had family of several children, with at least one lad of capable of putting the coal in. But clearly some families wanted this service, but the numbers would not be large.

The lads would know these clients and know when the coal would be delivered. I suspected they would sort out the arrangements during the school dinner time. I also understand they put several coals in on the same day, so pay could be attractive.

My hunch is the lads pennies, would sub-element the family living, rather than to be used as pocket money. Remember they put-in several loads, so the pay could be attractive. But I could be completely wrong, but good luck to them at least they were prepared to work.

PS: I never saw of them wearing anything from Marcus Price. Wow that is shop from the past !!!

My sincerest apologies, Barton, I was on about Bedlington and this, of course, is a Barrington topic. I was just being general in the putting in of coal for people. Hope you accept my error.

Edited by keith lockey

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This 'coal-shovelling racket' was similar to the 'potato-picking racket'. I remember a lad* at Westridge who had the 'concession' at Ridge Farm - come the picking season he would stand in the cloakroom at school and take names of lads who wanted work. He'd ride on the tractor in front of the pickers and was paid 10 bob, the pickers were on half that. Oh, and you had to bung him a shilling.

*I'm not going to name him as I know his older brother is on the Forum.

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No need to apologise Keith, but to be honest I cannot remember any old folk (pensioners) apart from the Phillipson's. I am sure there was, but the numbers must have been quite small, which begs the question where did they all go at 65.

Hopefully they were given a miners cottage, or maybe lived in with their daughters/sons, but I suspect the answer was the life expectancy in the 50's was only 65 years.

I can also vaguely remember doing some potato picking, which you need good connections to get on the picking team. The farm was somewhere over West Sleekburn, I think my wage was 17 shillings and six pence for 4 days. You were allowed to bring a pail full of potatoes home at the very end.

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Can anyone remember the practice of "putting the coal†into the coal Cree's for pocket money. The free coal arrived and was dumped in a heap, close to the Cree. Certain families could not put the coal in and relied upon the local lads (junior school) for this task, which they got paid for. I was never involved with this business, nor did I try to muscle in. It was enough to put our own coal in. I was never aware of any hassle, with this pocket money business, but I do suspect that if anyone was daft enough to try you may get spoken to.

Incidentally, there was no police station/depot at Barrington. We had a visit maybe once a week with police on a bike from Bedlington. But we did have colliery police, but I am not sure how effective he was. Because of statement we used to use "you got a better job as a colliery policeâ€, in other words he had a very cushy job.

Ye i did it as did my brother and friends. We had our regulars and coming back from school seeing the coal dropped off, straight on with dirty clothes and away to get the coals in for pocket money. Canny enjoyable when you got paid.

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Tell you a story here.

Left school this day and walking home with the lads. This laddy came along on his racing bike and i asked for a go. Straight on and away i went down Cleasewell Hill. The coal wagon was out delivering the coal and as i was going down the bank and the rear of the wagon was facing me i applied the breaks as traffic was comin towards me. Guess what ? no breaks working. Heading fast toweards the coal wagon panic enters as i close in on the rear of the coal wagon. I had my hands on the bend of the racing handles and moved them and duck my head as i went under the lower part and come to an abrupt CRASH. Luckily i may have been seriously hurt. but me quick thinking saved me .

Never again and mind that lad got some nasty words told him for not telling me about the breaks. I was only about 13 at the time.

Could have been unluck 13 too

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My Uncle Bill was a sparky at Dr. Pit and when he got his coal dumped my brother and I would help my cousin shovel it into the cree,

but wor Dad was a miner at Ashinton and when our coal came it was in bags and the men on the wagon would empty them into our cree, also our coal was much better quality and about 1 1/2 to 2 inches in size, Uncle Bills was smaller and flatter pieces with stone in it that would spark a lot, we were not a street apart hardly but each mine had its own delivery system

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We eventually got them delivered in bags - nine per load, if I remember, because my granny used to count them as they were put in the cree. We had two firesides at Terrier close, dining room and sitting room. But we only ever had one fire on at a time. We would carry live, burning coals, on a shovel, from the dining room into the sitting room at night, and I swear to this day you had to be sitting two feet away from either fire to get any benefit from it!!! All the heat seemed to go up the chimney. (Bear in mind when we first moved to Terrier Close in 1960[?] there were no radiators for central heating.) We used to go to bed with a pile of blankets on top. We kept our socks on and had two hot water bottles each. My brother would have a coal fire back tomorrow...not me.

Edited by keith lockey

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At Guide Post, West Avenue, we had a three bedroom house. Coal fire upstairs too in the master bedroom.

Me Dad used to carry the lighted coal up there when me mam was bad.

In the winter the frost was inside the windows. Bloody cold with single glaze windows.

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I remember big lumps of coal mixed in the loads and these had to be broken into smaller, easily managed sizes, with a big ball-pein hammer my Dad kept in the coalhouse (we called the hammer 'the lumphammer').

Yep, KeithL's right about piles of blankets and a hotwater bottle ... the bed was freezing when first entered but eventually warmed-up. One trick was to stick your head below the sheets/blankets and hope the hot breath would speed-up the warming process ... this practice was a bit nasty if baked beans had been consumed that evening.

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Absolutely right, Symptoms, regarding sticking your head under the blankets and letting your breath heat the bed. I was a master at it. I'd raise the blanket for a few seconds to let some air in then down would come the blankets again. I used to have two pillows. one under my head and one on top of it and the blankets and sheets HAD to be tucked under the mattress to make it draught-proof.

A tactic I used with the fire was to buy a bag of sticks at George Strakers and make a lattice of sticks and coal when the fire went down - just as if i was laying it from scratch. The sticks supplemented the coals and you could get a good fire all night. Two vital tools - bleezer and poker, if you didn't have a bleezer then the News of the World would do.

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I was thinking about that last post I did and the ref to baked beans; on reflection I can't recall having many baked beans as a kid but do remember 'farter' peas. Many here will remember these beasts ... dried peas left to soak overnight, with a bicarb of soda tablet chucked-in for good measure - the peas would be cooked as part of the meal the next day.

Edited by Symptoms

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I can remember one night returning back home after a few beers. I decided to take a bottle of Muters pop to bed, just in case I needed a drink during the night. Slept right through to the morning and found the bottle of pop frozen.

Our bedroom windows also froze up on the inside, but gosh it must have been cold that night for the pop to freeze.

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Found another school photo. Today's teachers would not entertain a class this size - 43 pupils.

Think this one is 1954 or 1955. If I could remember the teacher, and what class she taught - 1st - 2nd or 3rd then I would know the year.

post-3031-0-67693500-1374524967_thumb.pn

Back Row

Robert Ramsay – Eric Tielman? – Dennis? - ? – Ray Dickson? – Brian Trench – Ronny? – Hugh? - ? – Clark Mole – Rob Dixon? - ? – Alan Edgar - ?Robertson

Girls

? - ? - ? - ? Eileen? – Jean? - ? - ? -? - ? - ? - ? - ?

? - ? - ? - ? - ? Mrs/Miss? - ? - ? -? - ? - ?

Sitting

Brian Davison - ? - ? - ? ---------- ? – David Aisbtt? - ? – Ian Arkle?

Edited by Eggy1948

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Eggs wrote: "Today's teachers would not entertain a class this size - 43 pupils."

Give Mr Gove, the Tory Education Minister, time and a teacher/pupil radio of 1:43+ will become standard in state schools.

Edited by Symptoms

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