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Every night it was our job to fill the pails of coal for the fire. The coal house was across the road. It would take three pails to bank the fire up for the night, plus two pails for a late top up. It was a quite a task, every day of the year. This day we spotted a fuse wire with a detonator attached. Our dad was on hand and immediately took this prize away. The mind boggles if had being missed and landed in the fire. It would have taken half the house away.

the detonator it self would have done very little damage it was used in conjunction with the explosives that is what would have done the damage

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Barton wrote - "It would take three pails to bank the fire up for the night, plus two pails for a late top up."

I remember the term "bank the fire up for the night" or "banking-up"; Yep, my Mum would top-up the coal then ash from below the grate was piled on to form a sort of crust over coals... presumably to the slow the burn down (lack of oxygen maybe). Hey presto ... a rattle with the poker in the morning and away the fire would catch. Back boilers to heat the water - not those namby-pamby so called back-boilers found in central heating systems. Good old technology ... cast iron box in the back of the fireplace, flick of the chimney damper, flames wizz up the back of the fireplace and around the back boiler.

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I have fond memories of Barnton we lived in Alexander Row biggrin.gif I went to the school until it was decided to close it (Mrs Topping was the headmistress if my memory serves me correctly) and we were all sent to the far reaches of Bedlingtonshire to continue our education I among others was sent to the Station School.

I remember the co-op and and I also remember a little shop which only sold sweets and pop it was just like a wooden shed I forget the name of the street it was on but it stood at a right angle to Alexander Row and you had to go through a cut to get to it, there might have been two streets at one time but one was getting demolished because the footballers used one of the dissused houses as their changing room.

I remember the rag n bone man coming round and a french bloke selling onions mind you he had an Ashington twang about his dialect lol.

I remember not so fondly the oot side netties and believe me they were cald in winter

my mam used to cook all our meals on the fire using the old black ranges we bathed in a tin bath in front of the fire on a first come first served basis the kettle was constantly on topping the bath up as the water cooled.

On a winters morning I remember Ice on the inside of my bedroom window.

The front door was normaly locked as it was rarely used but the back door was always open even if we went out, thieving from a neighbour was very rare. However I do remember a spate of thefts from a few houses in the street and no one could figure it out until someone worked out that as the houses were in a row and there was an empty house in the middle unlike today in the loft space you could go virtually the full length of the street undetected if you were quiet and these buggers were dropping down through the loft hatches stealing things and going back up this went on for about 2 weeks... I remember the day they were caught after they were sorted out vigilante style by very angry pitmen and their wives the police were called I know these 2 fellows never ventured near Barnton ever again mind you it was a punishment to behold.... at times I think it should be done now.... biggrin.gif .Happy days as they say lol biggrin.gif

I`ve been trying to find some photo`s of the school but these are the only images i could find. The information given with the painting read `The school was a wooden structure with seven classrooms. The painting shows Jo Daison ringing the bell and Bedlington Brickworks in the background.

school1jpg2-1.jpg

The next image is a class photo taken in the 1930`s. The Headmaster Ben Berkley (front row, first right) and Jim Wood, teacher of class 3 (middle row, 3rd from right)

barringtonschool-1.jpg

Is that painting of the school done by McKenzie the painter and decorator at Stakeford ?

What an interesting chap he was. Don't know if he is alive today. Used to see him with his dog out for a walk. He was originally one of the Pitmen Painters. He did did a lot of paintings and i got a lot of them in 6x4 duplicated off him. He was also a keen cyclist and he passed his memories on to the Sixtownships. Makes interesting reading. But what a painter.

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Does anyone have any idea about what used to be in Barrington.

Was there a pit there, and when did it close?

Was that the only industry?

I am researching my family tree, and have relatives that lived in Office Row in the early 1900s.

Are these buildings still there? Did they belong to the coal board, or who else owned them?

My relative was described as a servant girl, living in office row, but I assume Office Row would not be where she worked, only lived.

Would love to hear of any history of this street, and/or Barrington.

Theres a lot of history connected to Barrington and the pit. Michael Longridge was a co-owner who had the Bedlington Ironworks. He wanted coal for the ironworks at a keen price and got involved in it. The first pit at Barrington was a landsale one and owned by Thomas Mason. It was Longridge that approached him for coal. When Barrington Colliery was due for improvements it was all carried out, but for some strange reason it never reopened.

I will get the history of Barrington on here very soon. Even got an old map of the village and pit. All the info. But i just dont know how to upload an attachment off my computer. If someone lets me know i wil get it up for you and history.

Oh, there was also a toll here too and you had to pay to pass the barrier. It was set up by the Coal Company.

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As promised some history on Barrington or Barnton to others. Hope stories like these are of interest for you all.

Will post more soon.

The weekend of October, 28th and 29th, 1900, in Barrington would be the one that went into the history books. It was a wet and stormy weekend and one that caused a great flood. The culvert under the colliery railway sidings became blocked with debris. Over eighty houses were affected as the water rose up to eight feet. The buildings affected were Blacksmith, School, Middle, Old Wood, Railway, and Chapel Rows. People were woke up around 2 am, to find over twelve inches of water in their homes. For safety most the residents then moved to the upstairs of their homes, with some being prepared to wade onto the railway embankment and higher ground. The men then went to help the colliery agent to try and free the culvert from the debris.

The colliery agent was so shocked by the flooding that he ordered a boat be brought in from the River Blyth. While waiting the engineers went to the colliery workshops and constructed a raft to assist in the rescue operation. The colliery workshops was then named "The Raft Yard.†With the boat and raft now operational, the men went out to rescue people from their houses, and place livestock safely away from the flooded area.

For two or three days the turmoil went on, with the men attempting to no avail to free the debris that blocked the culvert. So a decision was taken by the agent and engineers to use high explosives to free the culvert. Seven and a half pounds of the high explosives were then placed on top of the culvert and the obstruction was blasted away.

The most damage was done to Blacksmith and School Rows as the water invaded them while in bed. As the hovels had only two bedrooms and a bedroom in the living room, it was about impossible to carry belongings up the ladder to safety as the water rose to four feet downstairs.

The houses in Chapel and Middle Rows were flooded to about the same depths as Blacksmiths Row, but as these houses had a more commodious and accessible upstairs they managed to save a great deal of their belonging. The cleaning up procedure was tiring for the people. Everyone rallied round to help one another with the cleaning and drying out. The homeless were accommodated by neighbors, friends and relatives.

The management at the colliery were very caring in their approach to assist the miners during the mopping up period. Miners were excused for a few days so they could work on their homes. Joiners and masons moved into the homes to make any repairs that were needed, and the colliery supplied extra coals for to heat the homes and dry them out quicker.

A local diarist recorded the following. "A sever loss of furniture and other goods and many pigs and hens drowned. A truly pitiful sight which will live in the memory of all.â€

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I hope this pic and the names will bring memories flooding back for you lot from Barnton

Its Barrington County Primary School 1957

Hope you all like it.

Get your memories online or questions and see what we can all do

A photograph taken during 1957, of Barrington County Primary School. Back Row, Left to Right: Tom Dixon, George Trench, Roy Batchelor, Derick Edgar, Billy Montgomery, Wally Jackson, Andy Fairbairn, Ernie McGeorge, Laurence Napier, Billy Cochrane, George Frazer, Josey Robson. Third Row: Susan Barrat, Wendy Scott, Yvonne Harrison, Joan Clark, Linda Short, Margaret Dixon, Sheila Craddock, Joyce Fuller, Beryl Cassforth, Lesley Anderson, Margaret Gregg, Eileen Hutton, Liz Lee. Second Row: Cathy Swan, Ann Jenkinson, Vivian Johnson, Diane Dixon, Sandra Henderson, Carol Barron, Lynn Jarvis, Margaret Neil, Carol Slater, Ada Fuller, Margaret Jenkins, Mary Baker. Front Row: Charlie Spratt, Austin Anderton, David Adey, Melvin Rutter, Russell Perry, George Chapman, Jimmy Rutter. The teacher is Mr. Hunt.

post-1337-0-92076700-1325857533_thumb.jp

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I see someone was talking about Barrington Pit. I just thought i would pen in a story for him and give him an insight into how dangerous it was working underground. It was during a Thursday morning of February 1915, when it became known that a deputy-overman named John Stafford was missing in Barrington Colliery. John had descended at 2. am for the purpose of examining the working places of the hewers to make sure it was safe for them to begin. When the hewers reached the station, Stafford, whose duty it was to meet the men was missing. Fearing that something was wrong, the alarm was given and a search party organised to find him.

A search party made several attempts to enter some old workings, but were driven out by the smell of foul air. Mr. Edward Carr, the under-manager, arrived, and attempted to penetrate the old workings in which Stafford was believed to be, but he was unable to do so due to the condition of the ventilation. Mr. Carr then had an emergency ventilation system fixed up and put into operation to enable him to enter the old workings and penetrate further in.

The under-manager, as he entered, shouted several times on Mr. Stafford and finally heard a faint response followed by a shuffling noise. Proceeding, he came across Mr. Stafford lying on the ground in a semi conscious state. Stafford was then removed from the old workings and sent to bank [above ground] where he made a speedily recovery.

He afterwards explained that he was examining an old air-way, and found the ventilation defective. He turned to return to the flat, when he was overcome and stumbled and fell, extinguishing his lamp. He attempted to scramble out in the dark, but was overcome again by foul air. Altogether Mr. Stafford had been missing four hours. During this time the manager Mr. Clough, wired for Ashington and Elswick Rescue Brigades, but their services were not needed when Mr. Stafford was found.

Do you want anymore stories on Barrington ? Or am i Boring you ?

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Barton wrote - "It would take three pails to bank the fire up for the night, plus two pails for a late top up."

I remember the term "bank the fire up for the night" or "banking-up"; Yep, my Mum would top-up the coal then ash from below the grate was piled on to form a sort of crust over coals... presumably to the slow the burn down (lack of oxygen maybe). Hey presto ... a rattle with the poker in the morning and away the fire would catch. Back boilers to heat the water - not those namby-pamby so called back-boilers found in central heating systems. Good old technology ... cast iron box in the back of the fireplace, flick of the chimney damper, flames wizz up the back of the fireplace and around the back boiler.

I remember when we did not have a bleezer to pick the fire up. Using newspaper instead. Bloody thing caught fire didn't it. I bet a few of you did the same ?

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Well your on about Barnton School teachers i hope this brings your memories flooding back. Do you remember them ? lets have your stories on them please.

Barrington Village Primary School c 1959. Above is the staff. Left to right: Lillie Scott. Ann Milburn. Doreen Gorman. Margaret Topham [Head.] Milne Hunt. Ina Straker. June Rowling. Betty Blair.

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Barrington again for you all.

Come on lets get the missing names for my personal collection of photographs. it would be nice if it got completed.

Mrs. Gorman's Class c 1959. Left to right. Back row: Stephen Bushby. Derek Williamson. Brian Woolett. Alan Cowell. Henry Hall. Leslie Tiffin. Ian Bryson. Geoffrey Douglas. Ian Collis. Middle Row: Unknown. Glenda Main. Sandra Welsh. Lynne Turnbull. Ian Carnaby. Harry Dixon. Unknown. Lorraine Cuthbertson. Yvonne Black. Sandra Taylor. Front row: Jennifer Dobson. Clara Lee. Norma Dickinson. Marlene Leightley. Mrs. Doreen Gorman. Unknown. Joan White. Elizabeth Butcher. Unknown.

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For the gentleman who wanted to know about Barrington and the colliery. I have checked my personal records and come up with the following. I hope this helps you.

In 1866 the management was carried out by Messrs. Thomas Croudace and John Croudace, father and son, who were eventually succeeded by Mr. Mood, Mr. Prest, and Mr. E. Clough.

The agent for the company was Mr. Middleton, who was succeeded by Mr. J. G. Weeks, who's son, Councillor R. J. Weeks took over the position.

Originally Barrington Colliery was known as the Glebe Pit, and was owned by the Longridge family, when it was eventually bought by the Bedlington Coal Company, which afterwards sunk the Bomarsund Pit, thus creating more employment and consequently a greater output from the group of collieries.

In 1868 the old pit head was pulled down to be rebuilt and this was one of the first iron heap-stead's to be introduced to Northumberland, the change over necessitating the laying up of the colliery for 18 months.

Many of the old houses, those in Wood Row, built of wood, were pulled down to make way for newer and more substantial property, but apart from the erection of two rows of houses, building progress had not been the same as in other parts of Bedlingtonshire

i see a gentleman by the name of Mr. Carr took an active part in the establishment of the Mechanics Institute, and was secretary of this institution for the first two years of it's existence. In addition he was chairman of the committee for the University Extension Movement, which was occupying a good deal of attention at the time and generally was always ready to encourage young men and others in the pursuit of knowledge.

Politics were not neglected by Mr. Carr, who was one of Mr. Burt's election committee when the late and always highly esteemed representative of Morpeth was elected in 1874. A staunch Liberal he always associated himself with that political party and was a keen supporter of Mr. Burt.

My records also tell me that In many spheres Mr. Carr took a prominent part in local affairs and especially displayed a deep interest in educational matters. For 40 years he was school manager, being the first chairman for three years when the schools became grouped.

Old memories past on to family members and then to myself help give an insight into the past. After having been 66 years in the mine, Mr. Edward W. Carr, under-manager of Barrington Colliery, under the Bedlington Coal Co., retired in 1923. He had held that position for 37 years and in that time he noted many changes and developments in connection with the Bedlington Coal Co., who owned five collieries, Bedlington Dr. Pit, Bedlington "A†Pit, West Sleekburn, Bomarsund and Barrington.

Interesting and it just shows how valuable our memories are. If the family member had not passed them on to me they may well have been lost forever.

Don't forget visit our website for memories of the past at. www.sixtmedia.org.uk

I won't neglect this site as it is very interesting and im proud to help out all who use it. We don't have a forum as we have not got the time to keep it running in a proper manner. We have ongoing projects and if anyone wants to help great. I can keep you all informed on them. But for now i am going to help out on this forum myself with memories for you all. Lets all join in together as you have in the past and get the topics going and keep those memories alive.

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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More info on Barrington. This is a cracking little piece of history.

In 1869, John Burns, the brick and tile manufacturer, built a large house as residence for himself at Choppington Station. It was built to the German plan, and became known as the "Jarmin Hoos.†It was a beautiful house, and had a set of cannons on each side of the main doorway. During 1900 the works finally closed. About the same time, a group of miners from Barrington and Choppington got together under the leadership of William Temple. Temple was a scholar and a miner, with the others they decided to purchase the "Jarmin Hoos,†and convert it into a Workingmen's Social Club, the purchase was completed during November 1901. The building was then renamed The Barrington and Choppington Workmen's Club and Institute Ltd, with William Temple being the secretary. It was operating successfully for many years. However between the wars the membership began to decline. Eventually it was discontinued and the premises were sold on to a local publican. Later the house was converted into flats, but sadly this once beautiful building was demolished during September 1958.

Does anyone remember the murder at Barrington in 1949 ?

i have the story on it if your intrested. lets know.

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heres my final bit on Barrington. Hope this explains it all to you.

Barrington Colliery Village in 1922

1: Clay Pit.

2: Refuse Tip.

3: Clay Bogie Railway.

4: Brick Kilns (Newcastle Type) Established c 1870.

5: Wooden Foot Bridge to Pony Fields.

6: Drying Sheds, Pug Mill - Winch House. Brickyard enlarged 1888.

7: Boiler Shed.

8: Chimney Stack.

9: Kilns, Newcastle type, 1888.

10: Wooden Bridge for Cart Road.

11: Allotment Garden, site of 18th century ford.

12: Brickyard Manager's office.

13: Green road to colliery pony fields, known locally as the "Galloway

Track.â€

14: Stable Drain.

15: Waggon Way, Rope haulage.

16: Side of colliery waste-heap.

17: Empty Waggon Sidings.

18: Pit Timber Compound.

19: High Explosive Store.

20: Hemmil.

21: Stable.

22: Horse Food Store.

23: Draught Horse Stable.

24: Pony Trainers Cottage. Built 1900.

25: Farm Steward's Cottage. Built 1900.

26: Gardens and Elm Plantation.

27: Colliery Explosive Magazine.

28: Allotment Gardens in Old Clay Pit.

29: Waste Tip.

30: Saw Mill.

31: First Aid House.

32: Pick and Drill Sharpener's Shop.

33: Fitter's and Blacksmith's Shop.

34: Back Shaft (Molly Upcast) Winding Engine.

35: Chimney Stack for Underground Furnace.

36: Low Main Seam Steam Hauler.

37: Winch House for Ash Truck.

38: Henry Shaft Winder.

39: Henry Shaft.

40: Molly Shaft.

41: Boiler House Chimney (hexagonal type.)

42: Boiler Shed. 8 Lancashire Boilers.

43: Air Compressor.

44: Compressed Air Receiver.

45: Store Shed for Branch Man.

46: Allotment Gardens.

47: Old Reading Room, converted to Branch Man's Cottage.

48: Heapstead.

49: Screens.

50: Workmen's Fire Coal Hopper.

51: Raft Yard. Also site of old Beehive Brick Kilns.

52: Joiner's and Mechanic's Shops.

53: Lamp Cabin.

54: Line Shed.

55: Lean-to Corrugated Iron Stable.

56: Barrington House. Old Chimney Offices converted to 4 Officials houses, 1900.

57: Street-end Community Privies and Ash Pit.

58: Old Schools with Play Yard and outside Lavatories, 1851 - 1912.

59: School House for Headmaster, then Caretaker.

60: Back - to - back Cottages.

61: Burn from Doctor Pit.

62: Workmen's Co-op for Gunpowder, Candles and Lamp Oil.

63: Stone built Farm Cattle Shelter.

64: Allotment Gardens.

65: Wooden Houses.

66: Primitive Methodist Chapel, built 1874.

67: Billiard Room with 2 tables at East End, Reading & Games Room at West End.

68: Site of Barrington Main (Low Pit,) 1822-51.

69: Site of Waggon Way branches to Netherton, 1826-58.

70: Allotment Gardens.

71: Wicket Gate.

72: Allotment Gardens.

73: Wesleyan Chapel, 1883.

74: Farm House.

75: Quoit Pitch.

76: Old Clay Pit, partly filled in, established c 1851.

77: Morpeth Branch Railway, laid in 1857 on old waggon way originally made by George Stephenson in 1821 from Willow Bridge to River Blyth. First line of railway to be laid with Birkinshaw's malleable iron rails, rolled at Bedlington Iron Works.

78: Colliery Welfare Sports Ground after 1926.

79: Old Colliery Football Ground.

80: Cart Road to West Sleekburn and Bomarsund, paved with bricks.

81: Under Manager's House and Colliery Office.

Note on Streets

Old Wood Row, built 1851……. 25 houses. Demolished 1902.

Wood-Brick Row (Chapel)……….9 wooden houses, 11 brick built, 1851.

School Row, built 1851…………10 back-to back cottages, afterwards extended to

16, when the South side was named Blacksmith's

Row. Demolished 1937.

Sinkers Row, afterwards Stone Row…

Stone built in 1840. 10 houses.

Railway Row, 1865.

Middle Row, 1860.

Freehold Row, 1879.

Double Row, pre 1890.

Victoria Row, 1900.

Office Row, 1900.

Alexandra Row, 1901.

All colliery houses cleared from the site 1967-69.

well thats it. i hope this is helpful for you.

if you need anything else i will try to help but my recent posts should keep you going for a while.

post-1337-0-36746000-1325862321_thumb.jp

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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heres my final bit on Barrington. Hope this explains it all to you.

Barrington Colliery Village in 1922

1: Clay Pit.

2: Refuse Tip.

3: Clay Bogie Railway.

4: Brick Kilns (Newcastle Type) Established c 1870.

5: Wooden Foot Bridge to Pony Fields.

6: Drying Sheds, Pug Mill - Winch House. Brickyard enlarged 1888.

7: Boiler Shed.

8: Chimney Stack.

9: Kilns, Newcastle type, 1888.

10: Wooden Bridge for Cart Road.

11: Allotment Garden, site of 18th century ford.

12: Brickyard Manager's office.

13: Green road to colliery pony fields, known locally as the "Galloway

Track.â€

14: Stable Drain.

15: Waggon Way, Rope haulage.

16: Side of colliery waste-heap.

17: Empty Waggon Sidings.

18: Pit Timber Compound.

19: High Explosive Store.

20: Hemmil.

21: Stable.

22: Horse Food Store.

23: Draught Horse Stable.

24: Pony Trainers Cottage. Built 1900.

25: Farm Steward's Cottage. Built 1900.

26: Gardens and Elm Plantation.

27: Colliery Explosive Magazine.

28: Allotment Gardens in Old Clay Pit.

29: Waste Tip.

30: Saw Mill.

31: First Aid House.

32: Pick and Drill Sharpener's Shop.

33: Fitter's and Blacksmith's Shop.

34: Back Shaft (Molly Upcast) Winding Engine.

35: Chimney Stack for Underground Furnace.

36: Low Main Seam Steam Hauler.

37: Winch House for Ash Truck.

38: Henry Shaft Winder.

39: Henry Shaft.

40: Molly Shaft.

41: Boiler House Chimney (hexagonal type.)

42: Boiler Shed. 8 Lancashire Boilers.

43: Air Compressor.

44: Compressed Air Receiver.

45: Store Shed for Branch Man.

46: Allotment Gardens.

47: Old Reading Room, converted to Branch Man's Cottage.

48: Heapstead.

49: Screens.

50: Workmen's Fire Coal Hopper.

51: Raft Yard. Also site of old Beehive Brick Kilns.

52: Joiner's and Mechanic's Shops.

53: Lamp Cabin.

54: Line Shed.

55: Lean-to Corrugated Iron Stable.

56: Barrington House. Old Chimney Offices converted to 4 Officials houses, 1900.

57: Street-end Community Privies and Ash Pit.

58: Old Schools with Play Yard and outside Lavatories, 1851 - 1912.

59: School House for Headmaster, then Caretaker.

60: Back - to - back Cottages.

61: Burn from Doctor Pit.

62: Workmen's Co-op for Gunpowder, Candles and Lamp Oil.

63: Stone built Farm Cattle Shelter.

64: Allotment Gardens.

65: Wooden Houses.

66: Primitive Methodist Chapel, built 1874.

67: Billiard Room with 2 tables at East End, Reading & Games Room at West End.

68: Site of Barrington Main (Low Pit,) 1822-51.

69: Site of Waggon Way branches to Netherton, 1826-58.

70: Allotment Gardens.

71: Wicket Gate.

72: Allotment Gardens.

73: Wesleyan Chapel, 1883.

74: Farm House.

75: Quoit Pitch.

76: Old Clay Pit, partly filled in, established c 1851.

77: Morpeth Branch Railway, laid in 1857 on old waggon way originally made by George Stephenson in 1821 from Willow Bridge to River Blyth. First line of railway to be laid with Birkinshaw's malleable iron rails, rolled at Bedlington Iron Works.

78: Colliery Welfare Sports Ground after 1926.

79: Old Colliery Football Ground.

80: Cart Road to West Sleekburn and Bomarsund, paved with bricks.

81: Under Manager's House and Colliery Office.

Note on Streets

Old Wood Row, built 1851……. 25 houses. Demolished 1902.

Wood-Brick Row (Chapel)……….9 wooden houses, 11 brick built, 1851.

School Row, built 1851…………10 back-to back cottages, afterwards extended to

16, when the South side was named Blacksmith's

Row. Demolished 1937.

Sinkers Row, afterwards Stone Row…

Stone built in 1840. 10 houses.

Railway Row, 1865.

Middle Row, 1860.

Freehold Row, 1879.

Double Row, pre 1890.

Victoria Row, 1900.

Office Row, 1900.

Alexandra Row, 1901.

All colliery houses cleared from the site 1967-69.

well thats it. i hope this is helpful for you.

if you need anything else i will try to help but my recent posts should keep you going for a while.

While I was at college in the mid '70's (Kirkley Hall) I used to milk the cows at weekends for the Coatsworth family at Sleeburn cottage farm for extra money. We used to find allsorts in the feilds towards the old pit. The burn used to turn some funny colours as well. The cows would often have foot problems from sharp objects coming to the surface. The drainage was terrible on both sides of the road. The fields on the opposite side suffered run off from the heap. The only time that I remember that farm being completely dry for any legnth of time was in 1976. That farm is of course now the livery stables Edited by keith

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While I was at college in the mid '70's (Kirkley Hall) I used to milk the cows at weekends for the Coatsworth family at Sleeburn cottage farm for extra money. We used to find allsorts in the feilds towards the old pit. The burn used to turn some funny colours as well. The cows would often have foot problems from sharp objects coming to the surface. The drainage was terrible on both sides of the road. The fields on the opposite side suffered run off from the heap. The only time that I remember that farm being completely dry for any legnth of time was in 1976. That farm is of course now the livery stables

i think that was the notable hot summer was it Keith ?

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i think that was the notable hot summer was it Keith ?

Absolutely, even then it was well into the summer before it really dried out. I can remember talking to the contractor who was doing the groundworks when they were building the new houses below the heaps, on the land just over the railway lines. They were having a hell of a job getting the place drained. The old clay field drains were full of crap from the heap.

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i can't place his name at moment. i didn't go to school there, but do recall a lot from info past on. i think i even have a pic. look into my archives. i got some here at mo, but nearly all getting cataloged at moment. see what i can do.

i remember that summer well as there was a huge concert at the riverside park at Sheepwash. Concerts, beer tents :punk: and more. God i wish i could go back to those days. Anyway, i can't, but its our memories Keith, and they are precious to us. This is what this forum is all about, our memories and good to share. Wish we can get another summer like it this year, haha, never know tho might happen. If we do i will invite you down for a cool beer. No concerts but me old 45 rpm discs, haha. Take care Keith

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The engraved glass is in memory of John (11y) and Thomas (8y) Noble who were drowned at Barrington Colliery pond on 9th January 1895.

The two boys were skating on the ice, when suddenly the ice broke, which resulted in them both falling into the frozen pond and drowning. These were the only two sons John Noble had.

In those days it was very common for people to buy such memorial glasses.

I can also remember as a small boy playing around that pond, which did freeze over sometimes in the winter.

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yes, i know about that terrible incident Ralpie. It was the same in those days all over the county with the severe winters they had in those days. Many a life lost. there was a few at sheepwash too. But to think a glass was cut to memorial glasses ? did the proceeds go to the family to help them ?

You know Ralphie in all my time in local history this is actually the first time i have ever come across this and this is through your knowledge. just shows you we are never too old to learn more and its part of our journey in our long heritage and i thank you for this very interesting piece of history.

many thanks Ralphie.

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what is known about the Barrington Toll Gate. Lets se if we can build a complete picture on this together.

Were your relatives, family or friends involved in it ? why did it begin ?

come on lets see if we can get a complete picture of it.

i will post some info, i think, off the top of my head, the Fletcher family. they took the toll. i may be wrong, i may be right, i will check my archives over the weekend and post. but lets get this going for interest.

did you like my map and info on barrington village ? and, i hope it was helpfull. do you want more pics uploaded ?

just let me know, only too pleased to share with you all.

Oh, Barrington had a famous inventor for the coal mines too. any info ? more to talk about and interesting it is.

Do you remember the clay pit ?

I do well, and tremble when i think of the collectables in the tip i shot at with my slug gun and damaged. i should have taken them and i could have been worth i few more bob today.

mind you the rats was good fun with the air rifle tho. shot many.

did you swim in the clay pit ?

lets get the stories flowing.

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Our new look website is up and running. We have began putting our archives up, but itll take a good part of this year, maybe longer as our archive material is huge. If anyone would like to see how its going have a look at http://www.sixtownships.org.uk

Have a look in our archives and see Our Colliery Villages series from 1873. Pick the Barrington section or others and see how the villages were once.

Theres a good few on what we uploaded today and many more to come in that topic of Our Colliery Villages.

We aim to bring all our visitors the biggest local archives collection anywhere for free.

We also have our new Forum up and running too. Have a look and register and get instant access.

Add our website to your favourites, tell your friends and research your interests at our site. We hope we can help. if not the Forum is there for you too.

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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yes, i know about that terrible incident Ralpie. It was the same in those days all over the county with the severe winters they had in those days. Many a life lost. there was a few at sheepwash too. But to think a glass was cut to memorial glasses ? did the proceeds go to the family to help them ?

You know Ralphie in all my time in local history this is actually the first time i have ever come across this and this is through your knowledge. just shows you we are never too old to learn more and its part of our journey in our long heritage and i thank you for this very interesting piece of history.

many thanks Ralphie.

The engraved glasses were popular in recording events of interest that are pecular to the North East and the mining industry. There was even a glass engraved for the loss of equipment at Barrington Pit, 13th July 1894, not life which is bit unusal. The pit cage was damanged by a tub, with the result the miners were stuck down the pit for a day, until the repair was carried out. You may wish to check the records for confirmation.

This engraved Pit glass implies that the family of Noble did not receive any income from the glasses. Engraved glasses in those days, must like selling football shirts today,

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