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Tonyp

Glebe row

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I was looking at the 1911 census,I was looking at my grandmas place where she lived which was Salmon place they had a 15 year old girl living with them who was down as a servant her previous address was put down as glebe row. I've know where glebe red is but never heard of the later,I'd be interested to know we're it is or was.

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Tony - there is a topic 'Salmon Place ?' in 'Talk of the Town - Members Only' from 2014.  

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 01:09 PM

Hi Tonyp,

Francis and Jane Heron were in Salmon Place in 1911 with their children Mary 8yrs, Francis 6yrs, Margaret 4yrs and Samuel 2yrs. Jane is shown as 34 yrs from Bellingham.

It appears that Francis Ward Heron married Jane Charlton in 1901 in Bellingham.

 

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A couple of years ago John Dawson posted a photograph of the Alma Inn in 'Old Bedlington Photographs & Stories' . The adress for the Alma Inn was also Glebe Row .

 

According to http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com Glebe Row is now the A1068 out of Bedlington.

 

St. Cuthbert's Mission Hall also had the same adress if anybody know's where that was.

Edited by Canny lass

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The Tin Mission.

Glebe Row.

Sunday School.

I was a regular.

My book 'Folk Tales of Northumberland and Durham ' awarded for good attendance has been a huge influence on my life and love of history.

The tin Mission was just before a 'cut ' through to Bishops Meadow I think.

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Started to wonder what a 'Glebe' was - or is. Wikipedia has the answer:

 

"an area of land within an ecclesiastical parish used to support a parish priest"

 

It can also be called a "church furlong" or a "parsons close".

 

I wondered why the mission hall was so far from the Church and maybe this is the answer.

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Could Glebe Row be the road that's now called Glebe Road? Or, could it have been a smaller street off Glebe Road - as Maggie describes?

 

No Glebe road was seperate to Glebe Row , I think Glebe Row was just the row of houses the stood next to the Tanky pub.

 

I can remember going to Thompsons Store on Glebe Road, its now a closed down car showroom .

can anyone remember the big sign on the side of the building saying Thompsons Red Stamps, those must have been the earliest trading stamps ever ,long before green shield stamps and copererative store stamps..

 

The portraight of the daughter of J. Todd Thompson of Hartford Hall, Bedlington, the founder of Thompson's Red Stamp Stores did hang in the National Portraight Gallery.

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/paintings/miss-thompson-miss-patricia-thompson-47426

Edited by moe19

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If you read John Dawson's thread "Old Bedlington Photographs & Stories he places the Alma inn "on the corner of Glebe Row and Oliver's Buildings (a row of stone houses erected 1850).

 

I found a reference to Oliver's Buildings on genesunited.co.uk where the adress of the Kelly family is given as Oliver's Buildings, Glebe Row, Bedlington.

 

The first gives Glebe Row as being separate from Oliver's Buildings and the second gives Oliver's Buildings as being part of Glebe Row. Confusing! But, we seem to be in the right area. However, none of this fits in with Maggies 'tin mission' near Bishops Meadow. Was the Alma on the right or the left when leaving Bedlington via the 1068? I thought it was on the right.

Edited by Canny lass

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 However, none of this fits in with Maggies 'tin mission' near Bishops Meadow. .

The first house on Burdon Terrace next door to the secondhand shop beside the Wharton Arms was once a Vicarage, maybe that had some conection to Maggies Mission 

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Coming back to JD's excellent topic, Old Bedlington Photographs & Stories - John has posted a Picture (post #7) of what he calls "Glebe Road"

 

This same picture appears on ancestry.co.uk on the thread related to John N Barnes. On this thread, however, the title of the photo is  "The Alma Inn, Glebe Row" ... "where John N Barnes lived and worked".

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That sounds like a possibility, Moe. I didn't know about the vicarage on Burdon Tce.  I remember the Tankerville well and know it was on the doctor's side of the road but I jut cannot Place the Alma at all. It must have been gone Before my time. It was the photo mentioned above which made me wonder if the name Glebe Row had somehow or other changed over the years to Glebe Road, I found Glebe Road on Google maps (2015) and it's exactly where Maggie refers to the mission being.

 

at the same time - if the Alma was on the "corner of Glebe Row and Oliver's Buildings"  then it suggests that Glebe Row was a side street off Glebe Road.

Edited by Canny lass

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I'm not sure but I Think the vicarage behind St Cuthberts was built long before any of those houses on Burdon Terrace. If you look at the first edition OS map of Bedlington for 1860 there is only one building on the Bishop's Meadow area. Possibly it's the Wharton Arms. The building wasn't there on the Tithe Award map of 1843. It's not until the third edition of the map, dated 1920 that you find any Buildings.

 

According to the Bedlington Area Character Appraisal of January 2011 para 4.30, www.northumberland.gov.uk,  by 1920  "At the west end, new facilities appeared: the Prince of Wales Picture house opened Close to a new mission room". Maybe it's this mission that Maggie is referring to.

 

However, I finally found Glebe Row on the second edition OS map, dated 1897. It appears to be a small row of houses running parallel to the main road but immediately behind the houses fronting onto the main Bedlington - Choppington road on the right hand side leaving Bedlington. From the placement of the name it's actually difficult to say just which houses are referred to as Glebe Row, but there is only this small block which has been added since the first edition when Glebe Row wasn't mentioned.

 

So now we know!

Edited by Canny lass

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Heh heh! ......Thompson's Stores brings back memories!

Me Mutha used ti waak me poor little legs off,from Storey's Buildings,on thi Willow Bridge,at Choppington,aal thi way up ti thi top-end of Bedlington,ti

get shopping,spend her stamps,and get me tackety byeuts,[ minaiture pit byeuts wi steel heel and toe- plates,and studs...not Segs...studs!].

Aa was two ti three years aad,in 1946-7-8  ish,gaanin on four,before we shifted ti thi posh cooncil hooses wi inside netties and proppa baths,knaan as Hollymoont Square,in Bedlington.[the word "Estate" hadn't been coined ti designate thi post-war building program,they were knaan as "The new cooncil hooses" !]

Thi forst time a went ti Beamish Museum,wi me Wife,forra day oot,as was chuffed ti see the different sizes of "Tackety Byeuts" hingin' up aback a thi coonta!!,in thi hardware shop,alang wi filler's and shifter's shuul's![a "shifter" was generally a stoneman doon thi pit..not necessarilly a caunch-man!].

Reet doon ti thi smaa size aa wudda worn,alang wi aal thi otha poor kids hoo didn't hae any shoes..!

Us kids used ti play in the hooses owa from the picture-haal,next ti thi Tanky,when they were being pulled doon,after waatchin' Tarzan swingin aboot in thi jungle,avoiding spears being hoyed at 'im,and we used ti mek spears oot o' thi wood dowelling which was used for corner-beading on thi internal waals,in them days.[little things aalwis pleased little minds!]

We hoyed them aroond at each utha,and a divvent knaa enybody ,yit, hoo ivvor got speared or hurt in eny way during wor tarzan antics....![H n S....? !]

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