Jump to content

Recommended Posts

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/11910772/Final-Vulcan-bomber-flight-Crowds-urged-to-stay-away-from-XH558s-farewell.html

 

vulcan-bomber_3391007b.jpg

 

I thought the comment "They don't cancel the Notting Hill (stab) Fest because too many people turn up." was amusing.  All part of the modern PC Britain Experience, I suppose.  Why don't they replace the RAF roundels with circles of yellow stars?  Then there'd be oodles of free money to keep it flying! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

The warnings to stay away from Doncaster are valid, as people have been parking over safety exits and entrances. As for kerping her flying, it's no longer about money. She's exhausted her natural life. I'll be there - where yet I don't know- to bid her farewell this weekend. Just sorry I missed her at Coningsby yesterday in company with seven Spitfires and a pair of Hurricanes

Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone wishing to see this spectacular, quite extraordinary old girl in flight (note - this is weekend is NOT the final flight, but almost certainly the last time she will be seen in these parts) she is following a path that includes a low level flypast at Newcastle Airport then a straight route approximately following  the A1 with a flypast at Eshott Airfield. I am probably heading to the latter. The details can be found at http://www.vulcantothesky.org/ - no times have been released yet but it will be pm, I will keep you posted. This aircraft was part of my young life, having been built at the airfield close to my childhood home, and it will be an emotional moment to see her for the last time. What is also extraordinary is that the testbed prototype for the Vulcan design - the Avro 707, essentially a third-scale Vulcan - first flew in 1949; think about that - it's just four years after WW2; the Vulcan itself first flew in '52, itself an incredible achievment.

 

Go and see her; she's worth it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

As of this morning still no times for Vulcan forecast as departure time from Doncaster has not been fixed. She willbe at Newcastle Airport 40minutes after leaving Doncaster, Eshott 5minutes later.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For those who may be interested it is now confirmed she will leave Doncaster at 1pm, estimated time over Newcastle 1.40.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whoops you didn't tell me you'd Tubed it!  Anyway, I will leave it in the gallery now that it's uploaded here.  Maybe you want to upload some hi-res stills?

Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone wishing to see this spectacular, quite extraordinary old girl in flight (note - this is weekend is NOT the final flight, but almost certainly the last time she will be seen in these parts) she is following a path that includes a low level flypast at Newcastle Airport then a straight route approximately following  the A1 with a flypast at Eshott Airfield. I am probably heading to the latter. The details can be found at http://www.vulcantothesky.org/ - no times have been released yet but it will be pm, I will keep you posted. This aircraft was part of my young life, having been built at the airfield close to my childhood home, and it will be an emotional moment to see her for the last time. What is also extraordinary is that the testbed prototype for the Vulcan design - the Avro 707, essentially a third-scale Vulcan - first flew in 1949; think about that - it's just four years after WW2; the Vulcan itself first flew in '52, itself an incredible achievment.

 

Go and see her; she's worth it.

That was quite an era for experimental aircraft, Fairey Delta 1-2 Boulton Paul 110-120, Armstrong Whitworth, Handley Page and lots more, we led the world in aircraft development , swept wing, swing wings, hovercraft , vtol, stol, supersonic, oh well can not live in the past!

Link to post
Share on other sites

You make an interesting point, Vic. That post war period was the absolute heyday of the aviation industry in this country, right through from there until the early 70's. A quick look online lists nine 'aircraft manufacturing  plants' in the UK today, although Warton is listed twice and I'm no convinced Filton is still building anything. There must have been loads back then! I lived very close to one - Avro Woodford, where the Vulcan, among others, was built - and would regularly ride my bike down the farm track  to the perimeter fence and watch all manner of planes coming and going. Great fun in those days!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it was in the early fifties, we lived in Wollongong N.S.W. we saw the Vulcan fly over us it was on a round the world non stop flight i can remember it what a sight and sound.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create a free account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Hide Adverts


  • Latest News

    • Get the latest Northumberland news and updates delivered straight to your inbox
      The daughter of a learner motorcyclist who died in a smash during his first lesson is raising money in his memory for the medics who came to his aid.
      Darren Jobling, 50, was thrown from his bike and crashed into a tree on Front Street West in Bedlington, Northumberland in July, 2019.
      The Great North Air Ambulance Service (GNAAS) and North East Ambulance Service (NEAS) attended the scene and found that Mr Jobling had sustained severe chest injuries.
      He was taken to the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle by a NEAS road crew, accompanied by the critical care team from GNAAS.
      His daughter Danielle Jobling, 25, said: “GNAAS were there to assist straight away. They placed my dad in a coma and ensured he was comfortable.”
      Sadly, Mr Jobling, from Stakeford, Northumberland died a few hours later as a result of his injuries.

  • Similar Content

    • By threegee
      Vulcan 'V' Bomber over Eshott on Saturday 10th October 2015. See the bedlington.co.uk thread on this for further details.
    • By threegee
      Bored with their new toy - The Large Hadron Collider - CERN has decided to climb on the techno-nostalgia bandwagon by restoring the very first web page at the same URL as before. The fact that they are attempting to host it on the original hardware will become apparent when you try to download it!
      http://info.cern.ch/...TheProject.html
      What!? You expected pictures? You'll need to wait a few years (maybe for the very first bedlington.co.uk page?) for those.
      BTW notice that although there's a WWW in the URL the bottom level domain is in fact info. It was only later that "www." was widely adopted as the name of the machine that delivered an organisation's http: content. Even today CERN themselves are ignoring this convention and using "web." instead.
  • Latest Topics

×
×
  • Create New...