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Malcolm Robinson

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Nice one Mal.  I'll need to find time to sit for an hour to watch it again. Why don't you put a link in the Jack Bruce R.I.P. thread to direct folks here and to show what all those whippersnappers missed back in the day.

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The tit-suckers, ankle-bitters, and assorted rugrats will never be as wise as old Sym or, to a lesser extent, Mal.  Go on, show them what they missed and let them weep when they compare their heros with the greats of the 60s.

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The tit-suckers, ankle-bitters, and assorted rugrats will never be as wise as old Sym or, to a lesser extent, Mal.  Go on, show them what they missed and let them weep when they compare their heros with the greats of the 60s.

 

I laugh at the assumption that all younger folk have lesser taste than those of our elders.

 

The ignorance to the fact that the artists younger generations listen to had inspirations and influences from the same era that you refer to liking.

 

I don't tend to like 'popular' music as it is today but appreciate that it has it's place.

 

I like alot of electronic artists now who's influences stem from early electronic acts such as Kraftwerk which would not have seen the shores had it not been for the rise of the punk scene, shortly followed by northern soul, in Manchester. Circles......it all travels in circles.

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I agree Brett, our kids and Grandkids educate us on music.

In the same way we have given them our ideas and influences.

As Joni would say it is part of 'the Circle Game'

Symptoms you are just being a 'Workie Ticket'

Reverse psychology.

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Of course, the culturally gelded whippersnappers have little to draw on when attemping to make sense of the typical dirges served-up since the 80s.  Wall-to-wall Morrisseyesque clones have been infecting the scene for a generation reducing cultural vigor to a trickle.  The absence of any real 'greats' during the last half-lifetime has left us with a void being filled by the talentless disc-spinners and their William Topaz McGonagall like lyrics.

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What is wrong with Morrisey?

Typical Dirges now your talking !

You cannot beat misery music.

Cultural Vigour trickling away!

'On the last Sabbath Day of 1879

Which will be remembered for a very long time'

William Mc Gonagall

Maybe the students of Edinburgh could award our very own Symptoms with an award.

Or simply quote Monty Python and the poems of Ewan Mc Teagle!

'Lend us a quid

I am expecting a Postal Order'

Or

'What's bloody twenty quid to the Midland Bank'

Check these out for more misery !

Try not to laugh.

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Symptoms says 'wall to wall Morriseyesque clones have been infecting the scene for a generation'

Hence my comment

What is wrong with Morrisey!

After all 'there is a light that never goes out'

The Tay Bridge disaster is a comment on

Mc Gonagall

The students in Edinburgh gave him a spoof award.

Symptoms insists that 'a generation have

reduced cultural vigur to a trickle'

Stirring things up or Working his ticket perhaps.

Morrisey is a favourite within our household.

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Of course, the culturally gelded whippersnappers have little to draw on when attemping to make sense of the typical dirges served-up since the 80s. Wall-to-wall Morrisseyesque clones have been infecting the scene for a generation reducing cultural vigor to a trickle. The absence of any real 'greats' during the last half-lifetime has left us with a void being filled by the talentless disc-spinners and their William Topaz McGonagall like lyrics.

Surely that's all subjective.

For me music hold memories so my greats will vary greatly to other peoples.

Yes you will always have your widely acclaimed greats but that's a whole other conversation about the availability of music and how it is now digested.

 

When these so-called greats existed you only had music available in one format and you didn't have the array of music available to you so you tended to play the same record over and over from back to front. Albums weren't collections of songs they were a journey that took you from A-B throughout the duration.

 

The saturation and availability of music doesn't generate your 'greats' or does it?

 

Does it not just mean that because of the amount of music out there that there aren't as many people willing to brandish them in that way.

 

I personally love the fact that I can find any genre of music by pretty much any artists at the click of a button but that is due to my appreciation of different types of music.

 

I can go from listening to John Coltrane to Pink Floyd to Portico Quartet or Hidden Orchestra all in the same hour. 

 

Like I said it's subjective but just because you are not willing to accept that not everyone holds your esteemed artists as greats anymore doesn't make other people incorrect.

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Brett, 

in general terms I agree with you, I am 66 years old, have been listening to / going to gigs / and collecting my music since I was 12 years old. My tastes are wide and varied and I love it that in todays modern, digital age I can see and hear 99.99% of all artists (whether their music is current of from years gone by), before going on the acquire any of their records. I still buy the odd CD, but mostly these days I download, either via my eMusic subscription or a sharing site like Soulseek. Hence I usually have somewhere in the region of 8-12 new albums per month.

I tend to look at Music like an Oak Tree. Music is the trunk and then as the tree grows and sprouts branches etc. they are either the different artists / styles / genres that you can choose to select. It's never ending and I really like discovering new talent that appeals to my ears, my heart & my soul. Long may it continue.

 

However, I have never been able to get into The Smiths or Morrisey, I've not really heard one track that is uplifting or inspirational or even passable. One of my best friends is Morrisey mad and has tried for years to convert me, to no avail. And, I haven't got around to slitting my throat yet, but there's still time, I suppose. 

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But that doesn't make it bad music as it appeals to someone  :whistle:

 

On the other hand "Opinions are like bumholes.......everyone has one".

 

I'm not an avid fan of Morrissey but I don't mind the odd track.

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Brett, I guess that's where you are totally correct about it all being subjective.

 

But, each individual can apply his own taste to that well known quote "Life's too short to listen to bad music". Whatever constitutes good or bad (in anything) is what makes us all different.

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