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John Fox (foxy)

Then And Now

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Why was Glebe Court knocked down?  They look to be reasonably modern ... or maybe that was the problem.

Bernicia Homes Replied to West Bedlington Town council's request for why Glebe Court was to be Demolished.

In the reply Bernicia Basically said The housing was no longer fit for purpose under the disability discrimination act and it would be more expensive and time consuming to make them DDA compliant, then Demolish and start over.

If anyone wants to see the Letter from Bernicia Homes To West Bedlington Town council, it would be best to speak to the Town Clerk John Nicholson.

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A member of the public raised the matter after the explanation he got off Bernicia was that the corridors were too narrow for modern disabled regulations.  

If that is the case there must be a lot of older buildings to come down now?!?  :unsure:    

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A member of the public raised the matter after the explanation he got off Bernicia was that the corridors were too narrow for modern disabled regulations.  

If that is the case there must be a lot of older buildings to come down now?!?  :unsure:    

Modern disabled regulations do not apply to building built or changed before the regulations came into force, however if you are altering or building a Building now you have to comply with the regulations set under the disability discrimination act.

An Example would be The Community centre the building has only been changed in one area so only that area has the comply with disability discrimination act regulations.

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Foxy love your  then and now photos. Just wondering what used to be on the Johnny Johnson home site next door to the light shop, I just cant remember.

The "Wheatsheaf" pub adjacent to Smails shop,with "Hunter's" shop built on,as you were heading down the bank,in that order.

Between Smails and the pub,ran the back lane for Hollymount Avenue,and about 50 yards down the lane,was the Co-op dairy warehouse,where all

the milk  supplies were stored,plus the dairy vans were kept there also.

The lite shop used to be Smails,or,"Smaily's" as we called it when we were kids.

I lived in Hollymount Square,from 3 years old,till I got married.

When I was about 11 years old,I used to go over to the dairy,and wait sometimes 2 hours ,for the delivery truck,coming from Stocksfield,Ryton,Crawcrook,Greenside,and over to our dairy.

At first,I couldn't lift a full wooden heavy 20-pint crate,["helping the milkman!"],so old Bob Reed,the Bedlington dairyman,with only one arm used to stack the crates off the lorry,three-high,and I used to pull the stack across the bare concrete floor,which Bob had dampened to help with slideability........!

I had to pull each stack about 15 yards,clear of the doors,and put the stacks in neat lines,so Bob could get at them to load his little Morris Minor van up in the morning,to start HIS deliveries around Bedlington.

At that age,my arms and legs ached,by the time I had pulled 30-odd full crates over the floor,and the same number of crates of empty bottles.

Those were the days of big heavy glass bottles with the wide necks,with cardboard tops,where you pressed out the centre to pull the top of the bottle off.

We kids collected the tops,dried them out,and played "Skimmers"with them!

As time went by,and I got stronger,I was literally throwing the crates up and onto the lorry deck,as I took turns with the lorry driver,and old Bob,to load up the lorry with all the empties.

Best part was having a ride over to Seaton Delaval dairy,to unload all their crates,and take on the empties,then from there,back over to Choppington,Scotland Gate dairy,...same again,then back home.

It was bloody hard work,a lot of fun and gud crack,cos the old'uns treated me like a young man,not a kid!

My reward was a couple of "buckshee"pints of milk,for my Mother,and sometimes a bottle of orange juice,you know....the third-pint ones...they were a luxury item,cos rations were just about ending,so my "pay",in milk,saved my Mother a bit of money each day,it all mounted up,in those hard times!

Bob drove his van all over Bedlington,with only the one arm,his right one,and he changed gear by pushing his arm through the steering wheel,changing gear,then resuming his hold on the wheel as normal.

I never ever heard of old Bob having an accident of any kind!

A bit off-topic,but you set me on a bender,Eileen,with your query!!

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On 07/12/2013 at 17:54, Symptoms said:

Here's some more:

 

post-894-0-61724900-1386438665_thumb.jpg

 

@Symptoms - whilst searching for info on the Netherton Colliery banner I noticed this banner - SLEEKBURN "A" - you posted. The West Sleekburn pit, as you also posted, has a different banner. 

It may seem obvious, but rather than just assume, do you know if this was the Bedlington 'A' pit banner? 

I know Bedlington Station was originally the village of Sleekburn, before the Bedlington railway station opened, but I have never seen the Bedlington 'A' pit named anywhere, including the Durham Mining Museum (DMM) site, as Sleekburn A. 

The DMM has Bedlington 'A' pit opening in 1838 and the Disused railway station site has this info on the railway station :-

 

 

Disused railway stations.jpg

Edited by Eggy1948

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Eggs ... sorry for delay in replying.

The banner was commissioned in 1949 by the Bedlington 'A' Colliery Combined Levy Fund Committee;  the pit was also known as Sleekburn 'A' and originally the  'Auld Pit' when the first shaft was sunk in back in1838.  So, it's the same pit ... perhaps, some of the old boys just continued to call it Sleekburn Pit after Nationalisation.

West Sleekburn was a different pit, sometimes called 'The Winning' or Bedlington 'E'; its shaft was sunk in 1859.  Its banner was made from silk in 1950.

Hope this helps

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2 hours ago, Symptoms said:

Eggs ... sorry for delay in replying.

The banner was commissioned in 1949 by the Bedlington 'A' Colliery Combined Levy Fund Committee;  the pit was also known as Sleekburn 'A' and originally the  'Auld Pit' when the first shaft was sunk in back in1838.  So, it's the same pit ... perhaps, some of the old boys just continued to call it Sleekburn Pit after Nationalisation.

West Sleekburn was a different pit, sometimes called 'The Winning' or Bedlington 'E'; its shaft was sunk in 1859.  Its banner was made from silk in 1950.

Hope this helps

Cheers Sym - it did seem obvious but had to check. Surprised the DMM never refers to it in the history of the 'A' pit!

I probably was told, in the 50's or 60's,  it was Sleekburn 'A' but just can't remember any of my family, neighbours or mates (who started there in the mid 60's ) using the Sleekburn name.

I posted the image on the Bedlington remembered Facebook group and one member commented :-    I worked there my dad worked there and my grandad was sadly killed there my dad would always say this is sleekburn pit he would never accept that the name had changed......

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