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48 minutes ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

A divvent knaa Djevvy's Marra,Jas...did he nivvor work at the Pit?..in fact,aam wondering if Djevvy is still knocking aroond yit..

A wus wondering if any o' ye's had a musical talent that might o'tekkin ye's doon ti the high life...cos that's why my eldest Son went doon...ti be a recording engineer/record Producer,and that was in 1987 when he went,when the music biz was thriving.

 

Don't know about Djevvy - I will try and find out.

Neither Jas, Ovalteeny or me worked at the pit. I remember I applied to be an electrician at the 'A' pit a few weeks before I left the Grammar school, July 1965 but what told there were no apprenticeships going at the time so I would have to wait 6 months or more. Didn't tell me parents as I would have had me ears clipped but I always enjoyed watching me dad (who eventually became an electrician at Blyth Power Station after years of labouring) strip down and repair any electrical appliance belonging to us, or the neighbours. My mam, eldest of nine, Beatty Road (friends of the Graham's that lived near you in Hollymount Square) never wanted my dad to go down the pit when he cam out of the army after WW2. My mam had to help me granny look after the miners in the family and she knew all about the dangers. My uncle Luke Henderson was at the Dr Pit until an accident prevented him from ever working again. Some kids had found some detonators from the Dr Pit and were playing with them. Luke took them off the kids but one went off and me mam always said that the scars on his chest looked like a map of Great Britain. So granda Martin Henderson, uncles Martin, Lule.,Bob and George all worked at the pit. The second youngest son, Brian, joined the navy. 

Jas worked for LEP transport in Newcastle and transferred down to the London Office. After a short spell at Blyth Ship yard, whilst I was waiting for an apprenticeship at the 'A' pit joined, and it was announced that it was going to close I joined the Civil Service, much to the delight of me mam. I transferred from DHSS Longbenton to a DHSS Local Office in East Ham, London. I can't remember what Ovalteeny  was doing before he let Bedlington.

None of us had any musical talent, just a sense of adventure:D.

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On ‎11‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 23:10, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

473290312_BedlingtonApitheadgear.thumb.jpg.903e6f9eaea6665e8fb5b8fe95009c6a.jpg819940351_BedlintonApitheadgear2.thumb.jpg.6424831e0fcbbabda7b81999decea212.jpgYour query aboot the Shafts,Alan..!...thi  Aad Pit was a weird set-up..The "Smallest" Headgear,[on the left..] was the deepest and widest shaft,cos it ran both cages conventionally in the same shaft.

The shaft was 900 feet deep,and and the lowest seam was the "Harvey",at anything from 1 foot 10 inches high,varying up to 2 feet and 2 inches high.[They drifted down to the "Denton Low Main" seam not long before the Pit closed in 1971.]

A think they worked aboot twenty seams from that shaft,over the 145-or so-years of the Pit's life.

Noo,the "biggest" Headgear ,[on the right] was that size,because each cage had it's own shaft,sunk adjacent to each other,for some wierd reason which aa canna fathom oot![unless Geological conditions meant it had ti be that way.]...this set-up was referred to as "The Little Pit",and the "Harvey" shaft was referred to as .."The Big Pit".

The Little Pit was sunk down to the "Main Coal" seam,when a started,although it might have been down to a deeper level in the old days,and may have had a false "Sump",at the level it was when Aa started.[The Sump was generally at the shaft bottom,below the level where the cage would come to rest,to change tubs,and was a collection point for all of the minewater pumped from all over the pit...Where huge shaft pumps pumped all the water up the shaft and out to what we called.."The Pit Ponds"...settling chambers to allow all the silt to settle out.]

The "Banksmen", on the Heapstead",at the surface,and the "Onsetter's" at the shaft bottom,used ti walk a million miles a day,to load and unload each cage in turn,even though the shafts were only a few yards apart![as opposed to a normal set-up where they would only have to step a few feet from one cage to the other.[daily average..winding aboot 25-30 score of tubs a shift....i.e. 25 x 20 or 30 x 20...one score=20 tubs]

So the two headgears had three shafts between them!

Ye canna see from this angle,but if ye check oot any pics in thi gallery,showing the Headgears fully sideways on,ye wud see hoo the big headgear has the two cage wheels offset,and slung one below the other...and by scaling,ye might can envisage hoo far apart the two shafts were....the average Pit Cage Wheels were aroond 12 feet high...give or take a foot or two!...so ye can judge the size of the headgear...but summick is telling me that them wheels were a bit smaller than average....aa not sure!!

Hope ye dinna mind the lang-winded explanation Alan...ye knaa me!!

Cheers!

I have attached a couple of photos of the headgear from different viewpoints showing the unusual arrangement of the pulley wheels at the “Little Pit’.

In James Tuck’s book “The Collieries of Northumberland”, there is a chapter on “The Auld Pit” and he says this is known as a ‘Tandem Headgear’ and that the only other tandem headgear in Northumberland was at Seaton Delaval colliery. He also mentions that the ‘Little Pit’ had 2 small diameter shafts but until I read your posting I didn’t appreciate that the reason for the tandem configuration was to position the pulleys over two separate shafts situated next to each other -  Thanks HPW for your excellent posting.

There must have been a ventilation shaft, so the ‘A’ pit would have had 4 shafts in total.

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On 12/12/2018 at 20:57, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Don't know about Djevvy - I will try and find out.

@HIGH PIT WILMA - unfortunately Davey Bower is no longer with us. If only I lived in Bedlington and still saw some of the lads from my teenage years.

Let's try one more photo that I think one of the lads in it, Eric Theilman, worked at the 'A' pit.

Eric lived in Shop Row so crosed the lines at the bottom of Shop Row to go to Barrington CP school.

After leaving secondary school I think he started the pit along with Norman Hills and Davey Bower. 

 

Station Welfare Park named.jpg

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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On 12/12/2018 at 11:36, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

 but was admired by what he swung around in the pit baths:).

.... that must have been one of them bonny coloured, chequered bath towels that they sold in the pit canteen.

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8 hours ago, Canny lass said:

.... that must have been one of them bonny coloured, chequered bath towels that they sold in the pit canteen.

Aye, and I'd bet all the other lads were jealous!😉

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Hi Alan! Thanks for letting me know about this! A canna think where Union Street is.. but aal check it out and go to see it to take a picture for posterity! Been a bit heavy here for a while now wi health..both of us. This is a great way to remind people how the town prospered by the hard work done by the Miners!.............. Alan, this was my reply to the post aboot the mural, and I lost it... noo it has been restored!! SO!.. Eric Thielman.... was my Electrician (or fitter... not sure noo.. lang time ago!), at Bates pit.. canny quiet lad.. when a was a Deputy, he wud dae owt ti help ye. A nivvor knew he was a Bedlington lad. 

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...... and we aal wanted a bonny big towel like his..... it wasn't a school tale either..!!... eh, he really was a canny lad. 

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Alan, the ventilation fans were aalwis connected to the up cast shafts in aal pits. Ye had wat was caaled the "Fan Drifts", which led from an "Inset", aboot 20 feet doon the shaft from the top, and which "Drifted" up and aroond ti thi Fanhoose. The Upcast shafts were aalwis just for Manriding, cos ye had ti travel through two sets of airlock doors which was impractical for any thoughts of high speed coalwork. But noo ye mention it, a really canna mind where the upcast ventilation shaft was, cos they had to stop coal drawing to ride men.. and the Ba ksmen and onsetters were paid so much for riding men as opposed to coal... they were paid by how many Scores of tubs they set up the shaft. So there must have been a separate air shaft.. or drift. Queer for me not ti remember!!... worrying! 

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12 hours ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

Hi Alan! Thanks for letting me know about this! A canna think where Union Street is.. but aal check it out and go to see it to take a picture for posterity! Been a bit heavy here for a while now wi health..both of us. This is a great way to remind people how the town prospered by the hard work done by the Miners!.............. Alan, this was my reply to the post aboot the mural, and I lost it... noo it has been restored!! SO!.. Eric Thielman.... was my Electrician (or fitter... not sure noo.. lang time ago!), at Bates pit.. canny quiet lad.. when a was a Deputy, he wud dae owt ti help ye. A nivvor knew he was a Bedlington lad. 

Eric was originally from Shop Row and went to Barrington CP school same time as me - 1953 to 1960. Bedlington Station secondary modern school - 1960 -1965. 'A pit when he left school but then went out with, and married a Bebside lass - Kathleen Popely and moved to Bebside. I think the first house he lived in at Cowpen was the street just past the Sydney Arms pub = Cowpen Road. No idea where he moved to after that. 

Union Street is where the old Wallaw cinema ( now Wetherspoons) used to be. Going down Union Street, passing Wetgerspoons on your right the mural is just a 'gud hockle' up the road on the left.

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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12 hours ago, HIGH PIT WILMA said:

but aal check it out and go to see it to take a picture for posterity

If you can't get down to Blyth and want a copy of the mural that I posted from Google street view then I am sure we can get it to you via your niece. Is your niece on the local Facebook groups - Bygone Bedlington - Past Times (just change it's name from sixtownships) ?

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