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Youtube clip by John Ashford - End of Coal Mining in Northumbria, featuring local lads  

You can never go on too long HPW! Every word is valuable to me. I all helps paint a picture of the life and times of my ancestors. It's not always a pretty picture but it's vivid and full of detail. A

A should mention that this pic was taken when we were driving the main roadway into a virgin seam that no pit in the country had ever worked,and was waiting to be opened up at the other side of a 36-f

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This pic is of John Marshall of Barrington who was a sinker for the Bedlington Coal Company.

He is pictured in his uniform during World War One.

John Marshall worked on widening the Margery Shaft at Bedlington 'A' Pit.

Four of Mr Marshalls five sons also worked with him in the pits at various times.

John Marshall retired in 1951, aged 70 years.

Its nice to put history online that is of interest to the forum users.

Anyone related to him ?

I will put more up soon.

post-1337-0-20733600-1370904135_thumb.jp

Edited by johndawsonjune1955
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This pic is of John Marshall of Barrington who was a sinker for the Bedlington Coal Company.

He is pictured in his uniform during World War One.

John Marshall worked on widening the Margery Shaft at Bedlington 'A' Pit.

Four of Mr Marshalls five sons also worked with him in the pits at various times.

John Marshall retired in 1951, aged 70 years.

Its nice to put history online that is of interest to the forum users.

Anyone related to him ?

I will put more up soon.

Nice shine on the boots, spurs on and his tunic buttons up the wrong way! or did they fasten that in those days?

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John - those images of the 'application form' are great .... what sort of date would they have been?

I would say Symptoms they are just before the Coal Industry was Nationalised, 1946 would be my guess because the coal industry was Nationalised on the 1st January 1947 and the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act was passed in 1946 and it say "The mines are to be Nationalised" in the "application form."

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John - those images of the 'application form' are great .... what sort of date would they have been?

It was 1946, Symptoms as it was just before the mines were Nationalised on January 1st 1947.

With Nationalisation came new coal cutting machines and, thousands of miners were wanted, including apprentices.

Just as Adam has posted is correct.

Edited by johndawsonjune1955
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Just looking at my notes

John Marshall was born in 1871 and after the war he was also involved as a shaft sinker at Barrington and Netherton.

So if he retired at 70, it must have been 1941(not 1951) either that or he worked till he was 80. (that's if you have his year of birth right)
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So if he retired at 70, it must have been 1941(not 1951) either that or he worked till he was 80. (that's if you have his year of birth right)

more than likely i just went off what was on the rear of pic, and it is obviously a mistake.

thanks for pointing that out Keith

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My Dad thinks the Winderman from the A pit had the surname White and lived near the colliery managers buildings opposite Liddels garage in Bomarsund.

He had a brother who ran a stonemasons/memorials business.

post-1337-0-18809200-1371420294_thumb.jpg

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Official accounts suggest that women were not employed underground at any pits in the Northumberland and Durham coalfields but I'm sure they must have done so in the very early days.

Check-out the Beeb's website for film clips of the NE coalfields: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/topics/coal-mining/ ... maybe this link has been posted previously. Have a look at the "Sorting Coal" clip to see women working at the screens.

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Husband and sons down below and the wife and daughters working the Gin Gan.

Hopefully they had a horse to wind up the coal from the bell pit.

I believe the Gin was from engine, the gan was as in go.

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