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yes. they said you got a job in the mines you had a job for life.

How wrong that was

On a good note 200 ex coal miners set on at the pot-ash mine in Yorkshire and 80 more needed very soon.

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This pic is of John Marshall of Barrington who was a sinker for the Bedlington Coal Company.

He is pictured in his uniform during World War One.

John Marshall worked on widening the Margery Shaft at Bedlington 'A' Pit.

Four of Mr Marshalls five sons also worked with him in the pits at various times.

John Marshall retired in 1951, aged 70 years.

Its nice to put history online that is of interest to the forum users.

Anyone related to him ?

I will put more up soon.

post-1337-0-20733600-1370904135_thumb.jp

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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This pic is of John Marshall of Barrington who was a sinker for the Bedlington Coal Company.

He is pictured in his uniform during World War One.

John Marshall worked on widening the Margery Shaft at Bedlington 'A' Pit.

Four of Mr Marshalls five sons also worked with him in the pits at various times.

John Marshall retired in 1951, aged 70 years.

Its nice to put history online that is of interest to the forum users.

Anyone related to him ?

I will put more up soon.

Nice shine on the boots, spurs on and his tunic buttons up the wrong way! or did they fasten that in those days?

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John - those images of the 'application form' are great .... what sort of date would they have been?

I would say Symptoms they are just before the Coal Industry was Nationalised, 1946 would be my guess because the coal industry was Nationalised on the 1st January 1947 and the Coal Industry Nationalisation Act was passed in 1946 and it say "The mines are to be Nationalised" in the "application form."

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John - those images of the 'application form' are great .... what sort of date would they have been?

It was 1946, Symptoms as it was just before the mines were Nationalised on January 1st 1947.

With Nationalisation came new coal cutting machines and, thousands of miners were wanted, including apprentices.

Just as Adam has posted is correct.

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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Just looking at my notes

John Marshall was born in 1871 and after the war he was also involved as a shaft sinker at Barrington and Netherton.

So if he retired at 70, it must have been 1941(not 1951) either that or he worked till he was 80. (that's if you have his year of birth right)

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So if he retired at 70, it must have been 1941(not 1951) either that or he worked till he was 80. (that's if you have his year of birth right)

more than likely i just went off what was on the rear of pic, and it is obviously a mistake.

thanks for pointing that out Keith

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My Dad thinks the Winderman from the A pit had the surname White and lived near the colliery managers buildings opposite Liddels garage in Bomarsund.

He had a brother who ran a stonemasons/memorials business.

post-1337-0-18809200-1371420294_thumb.jpg

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Netherton Miners 1973 - Front Row left to right -

1) Nickname was 'Shack' as he was a fanatical Sunderland supporter.

2) ?

3) ?

4) ?

5) Surname was Prime

6) ?

7) Vivian Joyce

post-1337-0-34160200-1371420593_thumb.jpg

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Official accounts suggest that women were not employed underground at any pits in the Northumberland and Durham coalfields but I'm sure they must have done so in the very early days.

Check-out the Beeb's website for film clips of the NE coalfields: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/topics/coal-mining/ ... maybe this link has been posted previously. Have a look at the "Sorting Coal" clip to see women working at the screens.

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My understanding is that whole families worked in the early days underground.

Together in death too!

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It certainly happened elsewhere in Blighty, both in coal mines and mineral mines, and is well documented; officical docs for the NE suggest it didn't happen in our pits.

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Husband and sons down below and the wife and daughters working the Gin Gan.

Hopefully they had a horse to wind up the coal from the bell pit.

I believe the Gin was from engine, the gan was as in go.

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