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List Of Pubs And Clubs - Bedlington District

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This months Northumbrian Magazine has an article by Gordon Wilkinson

How a Pub Makes a Name for Itself.

In the article he explains that during the Second World War sometimes beer was in short supply.

The Barrington Arms took action!

When beer was available a monkey was placed in the window to let locals know to call in for refreshments.

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"When beer was available a monkey was placed in the window to let locals know to call in for refreshments."

 

Yet another explanation of how the pub came to be known as The Monkey, and perhaps the best one so far!

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post-2987-0-64560000-1393924815_thumb.jppost-2987-0-26537700-1393924859_thumb.jp

 

In one of Evan Martin's books he records the pubs that were in Bedlington in 1886  -

 

Beerhouses

Alma Inn, Glebe Row, Wm Barnes.

Barrington Arms, Vulcan Place, William Herron.

Cross Tavern Market Place, John Phillips.

Fountain Inn, Glebe Row, John Simm.

Gardener's Arms Front Street, Margaret Birkley.

Traveller's Rest, Front Street, Henry Kidd.

Wharton Arms Inn, West End, G Anderson.

Wheat Sheaf Inn, East End, Andrew Hay.

 

Hotels, Inns and Taverns

Black Bull, Front St, Henry Ternent.

Blue Bell, West End, Thos Mole.

Bridge Inn, East End, Robed Leslie.

Dun Cow, East End, Wm Green.

Howard Arms, Market Place Mark Bowman.

King's Arms, Market Place Hutton Glover.

Mason's Arms, West End, Thomas Hay.

Northumberland Arms, Northumberland St, James Archer.

Oddfellows Arms, East End, T R Simm.

Percy Arms, Bedlington Station, Wonders & Son.

Puddlers Arms, Bank Top, Joseph Wm Craggs.

Red Lion, Thos Robson.

Sun Inn, Front St, Wm Scott.

Tankerville Arms, Glebe Row, Joseph Cowans.

Traveller's Rest, Scotland Gate, T Morrow.

Turk's Head, Market Place, Mrs Hudspith.

 

I've no idea what the difference is between a Beerhouse, an Inn and a Tavern but according to this list there were 24 of them!

At the bottom end of the town, on the site where a "Jonnie Johnson†retirement home, "Wansbeck Court†has been built there used to be a block of flats. The block of flats was at some stage The Wheat Sheaf Inn as the name of the pub could be seen painted on the front of the building right up to the time the building was pulled down. It was demolished sometime in the 1950's. I have attached a photo of the inn.

On the attached map of Bedlington in 1897, PH means public house and most of the pubs listed above can be picked up on the map. The one marked in yellow is the position of The Wheat Sheaf Inn.

 

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attachicon.gifThe Wheat Sheaf Inn.jpgattachicon.gifBedlington 1897.jpg

 

In one of Evan Martin's books he records the pubs that were in Bedlington in 1886  -

 

Beerhouses

Alma Inn, Glebe Row, Wm Barnes.

Barrington Arms, Vulcan Place, William Herron.

Cross Tavern Market Place, John Phillips.

Fountain Inn, Glebe Row, John Simm.

Gardener's Arms Front Street, Margaret Birkley.

Traveller's Rest, Front Street, Henry Kidd.

Wharton Arms Inn, West End, G Anderson.

Wheat Sheaf Inn, East End, Andrew Hay.

 

Hotels, Inns and Taverns

Black Bull, Front St, Henry Ternent.

Blue Bell, West End, Thos Mole.

Bridge Inn, East End, Robed Leslie.

Dun Cow, East End, Wm Green.

Howard Arms, Market Place Mark Bowman.

King's Arms, Market Place Hutton Glover.

Mason's Arms, West End, Thomas Hay.

Northumberland Arms, Northumberland St, James Archer.

Oddfellows Arms, East End, T R Simm.

Percy Arms, Bedlington Station, Wonders & Son.

Puddlers Arms, Bank Top, Joseph Wm Craggs.

Red Lion, Thos Robson.

Sun Inn, Front St, Wm Scott.

Tankerville Arms, Glebe Row, Joseph Cowans.

Traveller's Rest, Scotland Gate, T Morrow.

Turk's Head, Market Place, Mrs Hudspith.

 

I've no idea what the difference is between a Beerhouse, an Inn and a Tavern but according to this list there were 24 of them!

At the bottom end of the town, on the site where a "Jonnie Johnson†retirement home, "Wansbeck Court†has been built there used to be a block of flats. The block of flats was at some stage The Wheat Sheaf Inn as the name of the pub could be seen painted on the front of the building right up to the time the building was pulled down. It was demolished sometime in the 1950's. I have attached a photo of the inn.

On the attached map of Bedlington in 1897, PH means public house and most of the pubs listed above can be picked up on the map. The one marked in yellow is the position of The Wheat Sheaf Inn.

Like the 1897 map James. Most of the ones I've got (found on-line) don't have specific dates and they have more street buildings so this is the ealiest, with more info on, that I have seen. 

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Woudn't have a spoon in it .........?!

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Aye,Tony,when a was a long-haired lout in a leather jerkin,back in the bad old '60's,a was a lead guitarist in a pop group,and a played many a saturday night at the old top club which you refer to,down the street,in the middle of the terrace.

It used to get packed out,like all the other clubs mentioned here,in which I also played,the worst one for me personally to play in,was the "Gate club",cos I was playing in front of 90% of Choppington High Pit miners ,a lot of who were my own Marra's,and who,on a following Monday morning,back at the pit,would take the wee-wee out of me no end,all banter of course!!

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An interesting subject. Looking back at earlier posts I noticed the Hartford Bridge Inn/Jolly Anglers noted as the same; a short book I read recently on the history of Plessey says the Anglers was on one side of the bridge (it remains there as a private residence) while the Hartford Bridge Inn was on the other side - you can see the old wall and gateway to where it would have stood. It also said there were two further ale houses, I believe, in the vicinity.

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"When beer was available a monkey was placed in the window to let locals know to call in for refreshments."

 

Yet another explanation of how the pub came to be known as The Monkey, and perhaps the best one so far!

Too late for the tourist trade but the now closed Barrington Arms gets a paragraph in Issue No 138 - February/March 2014 of The Northumbrian - Gordon Wilkinson (journalist I think) on a subject 'How a Pub makes a name for itself' has written :-

...... However a look in the window of the Barrington Arms in Bedlington during the Second World War could have brought good news to those fancying a pint. Beer was rationed in those days but it could be in short supply , so the landlord would stick a stuffed monkey in the window to tip off those in the know that he had recieved a consignment. The pub has been named the nicknamed The Monkey ever since.'

 

No mention of where he got the story from.

Edited by Eggy1948

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Too late for the tourist trade but the now closed Barrington Arms

 Interesting stuff; The Monkey is, incidentally, still open, under new management, and doing OK by all accounts.

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What about bedlington c.w club very popular on whippet racing day,on sunday

Mr Elliott was the manager who was also the parki

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...

 

No mention of where he got the story from.

 

Sounds rather like yet another of those nuggets of ancient folklore - that someone just invented.  At least Wikipedia would demand attribution.

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It's a fact mate the club was there for years,mr Elliott was the parki there his son married Syd johnsons daughter who died of cancer

& is buried @ the Horton Rd cematery I think the parkies son was called Alan.

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It's a fact mate the club was there for years,mr Elliott was the parki there his son married Syd johnsons daughter who died of cancer

& is buried @ the Horton Rd cematery I think the parkies son was called Alan.

 

Hi Tony, P. Syd & June's daughter was called Caroline, I believe, and she was married to Aln (Not Alan the conventional way). As for the club I'm too young to remember it.

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Keith! Your older than me lol

 

Shhhhhhhhh! Don't tell everyone. Did the Cricket Club have a bar - behind Hirst head / Villas?

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Shhhhhhhhh! Don't tell everyone. Did the Cricket Club have a bar - behind Hirst head / Villas?

If it's the same cricket club that's there now it still has a bar, I was in it not long ago.

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I was never in, Merc'. Cricket is like watching paint dry to me. Mind you I liked bowling a maiden over...ooh no missus.

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Had some good times there aswell in the summer,they orginised 18 over cricket which consisted of pubs from bedlington

Plus the Sally Army & the council each team was allowed one cricketer who played for bedlington & he organised

The team & wasn't allowed to bat till the 4th wicket went down...Good days

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I was never in, Merc'. Cricket is like watching paint dry to me. Mind you I liked bowling a maiden over...ooh no missus.

 

Keith, you didn't think I was playing did you? Where would I stand my pint?

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Had some good times there aswell in the summer,they orginised 18 over cricket which consisted of pubs from bedlington

Plus the Sally Army & the council each team was allowed one cricketer who played for bedlington & he organised

The team & wasn't allowed to bat till the 4th wicket went down...Good days

 

TonyP, My bro says the pubs and clubs played for a trophy at the Cricket Club. Can you remember the name of it?

 

I'm going to put this in THE SPORTS CLUB forum as well.

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Can't remember the trophy name I think it was a shield,just remember the good times,the funny thing was

Everybody thought they would have a walkover when they played the Sally Army but there cricket player was called Brian dixon

He opened the batting for Bedlington & I do believe he played for Northumberland ."by the way I do know you & your brother very well nice to see your doing O.K........

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the cricket club trophy for the pubs and clubs was called the bedlington cricket club novices . as a mate of mine showed me a medal from it tonight.

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