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On 25/06/2018 at 19:45, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

@Vic Baldry - this is the list of Stead Lane tenants, from the 40's, that Reedy's dad could remember from back then. I see he was just one house out with your grandparents but still amazing all the names he has remembered from the Bank Top & Stead Lane area.  

Yes my Dad and grandparents lived at 35 Stead Lane. 

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I'm not sure if I'm replying to the right topic but in response to the dam building in the river, I distinctly remember my Dad (Edward Carey 35 Stead Lane) telling us how he used to tickle trout when he was a lad. I have vague memories that you could get down to the river from the back of the garden? Am I remembering that right? Also memories of a  huge garden, the chickens, and a pig, and the big outside toilet full of spiders! My sister and I used to swing on the gate looking down to Blyth and the sea. Cath Baldry (Carey) 

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34 minutes ago, Vic Baldry said:

I'm not sure if I'm replying to the right topic but in response to the dam building in the river, I distinctly remember my Dad (Edward Carey 35 Stead Lane) telling us how he used to tickle trout when he was a lad. I have vague memories that you could get down to the river from the back of the garden? Am I remembering that right? Also memories of a  huge garden, the chickens, and a pig, and the big outside toilet full of spiders! My sister and I used to swing on the gate looking down to Blyth and the sea. Cath Baldry (Carey) 

We do it all the time Vic,  mix up the comments within topics

 

Project1.jpg

I think the council estate - Woodside - that is behind Stead lane would have been built in the late 1940's or early 1950's. This old map, 1938, published 1947 shows the area before the council estate, and bungalows at the bottom of Stead lane were built.

Project2.jpg

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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9 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Snap - we did exactly the same but I always assumed the dam we build had been knocked down by other groups of lads; never knew about the fishermen and the sea trout.👍

I turned 71 last year - wouldn't be surprised if we built the dam up together on occasions😊

Eggy

Yes Eggy, we almost certainly worked together on the dam construction. I do remember you as a youngun though not from school because our education paths never crossed. At the Grammar school you were in the same class as my cousin Michael at one time or maybe all the time.

 Does anyone remember Billy Winter swimming from the furnace bridge down stream to the black bridge(railway) on a full tide? There was a raw sewage outfall next to the furnace bridge so he swam through and with it downstream! His brother Geordie did it a couple of years later. I never heard anything but I bet they were both poorly afterwards with at least gut rot. We used to shoot the rats with our catapults at that outfall.

 After the sewage water was diverted from the outfall the worms we used for fishing at Granary Point were never as big.

Jammy

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29 minutes ago, Jammy said:

Yes Eggy, we almost certainly worked together on the dam construction. I do remember you as a youngun though not from school because our education paths never crossed. At the Grammar school you were in the same class as my cousin Michael at one time or maybe all the time. 

Same class as Michael, from Guidepost all the way through - 1960 to 1965.

1963 Class 3B named.jpg

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Jammy,Billy [ or..Willy ..as we call him!]..Winter, is an aad pit Marra,friend,and Nybor,of mine.I also worked with Dennis,and the youngin..was he called Tom?...was a young timber-leader at the Aad Pit at Bedlington,as was their Father.

I did my preliminary training,from leaving school,at Seaton Burn pit ,in 1959,and Geordie Winter was on the same training course,but I didn't know him well.He left the pits not lang after starting,and joined the Army.

Willy was as strong as an Ox,so the sewage musn'ta done him any harm![ye remindd me of a scene from the Shawshank Redemption film!!]

Aye,it was part of being a kid,to build dams across the river,and we always used to wonder who kept destroying aal wor work..aav nivvor given it any thowt in me adult years,till noo!!

It's obvious when ye realise it,but not when ya ten yeors aad!

Cheers!

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 HIGH PIT WILMA

 There is another brother and a sister Winter. The brother is Gordon and is the next brother down from Dennis. I cannot remember the name of the sister. I think she was next to Gordon but not sure which side. She may have departed this world. I knew father Billy as well because he kept canaries as I did at one time. The youngest is Tommy.

 Geordie lives not far from Puddlers Row. He was also very strong like Billy yet father Billy was short and slightly made. The strength probably came from the mother.

 As far as I know none of the other brothers fancied a sewage swim!

 Yes building and rebuilding the stone dam was part of growing up.

Jammy

 

 

 

 

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29 minutes ago, Jammy said:

 HIGH PIT WILMA

 There is another brother and a sister Winter. The brother is Gordon and is the next brother down from Dennis. I cannot remember the name of the sister. I think she was next to Gordon but not sure which side. She may have departed this world. I knew father Billy as well because he kept canaries as I did at one time. The youngest is Tommy.

 

Dennis - Vesta - Gordon & Tom are the four Winters I know from from Melrose Avenue. I think Dennis was the oldest. There is a photo in the Gallery -  Bedlington Station 1st School album - 1950's with a young Vesta in it.

29683995_507041919697329_4866373678119683432_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_sid=7206a8&_nc_oc=AQl-b-ByAMAXIhncnpMGM9l9MVkMWV5ayUX9TBqcAIIGGre7yIRmRE0IpjRfMW6AV8A&_nc_ht=scontent.flhr2-1.fna&_nc_tp=6&oh=05b458f8c7f192066a7295b613b3d997&oe=5ED5FF6E

Gordon is my age and we used to knock around together in the 1960's. Some lads had stolen a car and ditched it close to the tent were Gordon, me, Raymie Tyrie, Robin Hills and a couple others  camping in down the Free woods. The police woke us up early in the morning and took us off to the Top End cop shop for questioning. Naturally we were released without charge.

Tom the youngest tagged along with us when he reached drinking age, or probably the year before.  Gordon and Tom still going strong. I had a chat with Gordon last week on Facebook Messenger. 

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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I struggled to find the Vesta photo but did finally find a match!

I don't recognise her name from all those years ago.

I thought Gordon would be a school year younger than you but I could be wrong.

I went to school with Raymie and was my best school mate till those things that wore skirts took my interest.

I spoke to Raymie at the coop at the end of last year. He still lives at the Havelock with Val.

Robin Hills was in the scouts when I was a member. He was older than us. The last I knew he was living at Ellington before he died.

Jammy

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Hi Folks,Alan,Billy Winters was the oldest,as far as I always gathered,He was on Coalface work long before Dennis.

I started the Aad Pit in 1965,when I was transferred there from Choppington High Pit.

We were regarded by the Aad pit union as "Strangers",and " The Choppington Men".

They were very clanny at the Aad pit,even when other pits closed,like the Doctor Pit,and Cambois Pit,they were also "Strangers"...and strangers had to stand at the back of the queue when it came to drawing for spare Cyevils...[spare men were needed to fill the vacated jobs of those men who were idle].

So,after being on coalface work as a Coalcutterman,and Coalfiller,aged 21 yrs,I suddenly found myself working at the shaft bottom area of the pit.[where trainees usually start their first jobs underground!]

Dennis Winter worked on the Loader-end,at the High Main shaft bottom..and that is where I met him,and worked with him,till I got a cyevil on Composite work,with an older [41yrs old!!] Cambois Coalcutterman called Joe Hickman..a hell of a worker!

Tom came down the pit as a 16 yr lad not long afore the pit closed..I remember him as being a smashing natured ,jovial kid,who would do owt ti help anybody.

I never knew Gordon,or Willy's Sister.

Jammy,I worked with all the Hillsy's,The old timers were "Famous" Coalcuttermen at the aad pit,and Billy was a Shearer/Coalcutterman at Bates.

Norman was a canny kid.

Uncle Billy,at Bates pit,used ti play "Lily the Pink" on his mooth organ owa the "DAC" [Coalface Tannoy system],which was connected throughout the pit,reet ti thi Control Centre at Bank..[the surface],so ivrybody in the whole pit,used ti hear him,and shout for requests..!

The Manager had ti quietly ask him ti stop!

Just ti clarify a point..he only ever did that when there was a major Conveyor belt stoppage,and all the Machines were standing...in case anybody though it was a crazy unsafe thing to do...and nothing in the Coal Mines and Quarries Act 1954,says you cannot play ya Moothie when the belts are standing!!

I also worked with Alby Douds,Cappy Foreman ,Tommy O'Neil,Billy Crackett,Dusty Miller,and a fella called Billy Miller,who trained me to work on the Coalcutters..he was a hell of a Cutterman as weel. R.I.P. Billy Miller.

There were 900 men at the Aad Pit,and I knew hundreds of them at any given point in time..it didn't take lang ti get ti knaa them,when there were 30 men on each face,in each shift!...

Cheers Folks.

Stay Safe!

Bill.

Edited by HIGH PIT WILMA
Ammendment to text
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Jammy,it's late and aam buggaad,aal hook up wi ye thi morn!

Cheers.

Bill.

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12 hours ago, Jammy said:

I struggled to find the Vesta photo but did finally find a match!

I don't recognise her name from all those years ago.

I thought Gordon would be a school year younger than you but I could be wrong.

I went to school with Raymie and was my best school mate till those things that wore skirts took my interest.

I spoke to Raymie at the coop at the end of last year. He still lives at the Havelock with Val.

Robin Hills was in the scouts when I was a member. He was older than us. The last I knew he was living at Ellington before he died.

Jammy

I could be wrong about Gordon's age - I just know he was with our crowd first at the YMCA then whatever pub we could get into:).

A few names from our crowd are Robin Hills - Davey Bower - Gordon Winter (with Tommy following) - Raymie Tyrie ( I was Raymie & Val's best man at Morpeth registry and that would be around 1965 or 66) - Steven Locker - Norman Hills (Robins Cousin) -Norman Robson - Michael Joseph (Jass = boxer) - Ronnie Ince - Alex Third - Dave Aisbitt and older than us but we all mixed = Bob Patterson (or was it Pattinson) - Alan & Mick Maguie  (think Mick was younger ) -  and there were loads more good friends and casual acquaintances . I think the whole of Bedlington Station must have been mates - including the lasses that I haven't mentioned any names.

 

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9 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

I could be wrong about Gordon's age - I just know he was with our crowd first at the YMCA then whatever pub we could get into:).

A few names from our crowd are Robin Hills - Davey Bower - Gordon Winter (with Tommy following) - Raymie Tyrie ( I was Raymie & Val's best man at Morpeth registry and that would be around 1965 or 66) - Steven Locker - Norman Hills (Robins Cousin) -Norman Robson - Michael Joseph (Jass = boxer) - Ronnie Ince - Alex Third - Dave Aisbitt and older than us but we all mixed = Bob Patterson (or was it Pattinson) - Alan & Mick Maguie  (think Mick was younger ) -  and there were loads more good friends and casual acquaintances . I think the whole of Bedlington Station must have been mates - including the lasses that I haven't mentioned any names.

 

Alan,

         I know all the people you mention. You may know Norman Hills died in his early 50's I believe, with a heart problem as did Robin. Davey Bower is gone as is Mick Maguire. I grew up in the same street as Bob Pattison(big paddy). Bob's brother John was my mate and was also called paddy or padsa. Yes Alan Maguire is the oldest in the family. Dave Aisbitt was/is known as Dazzy. I think anyone around our age was known to us around the station.

 A radio program I listen to on Saturdays from 4 to 8pm is all 60's stuff so well worth a listen for us as kids growing up in the 60's. It's Gold radio and is on Sky channel 0121. It's also available as an app for phones and tablets and is available online. A google will find it very quickly. It brings back a lot of memories. Phones and tablets do not sound so good because of the poor speakers they have. It's on 24hrs a day when they have a mix of older music and often only an advert every 30 mins, so good. They may play 60's music from 10pm the rest of the week.

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Hi Folks,aye, a knew a lot of them youngin's,only cos a was transferred ti thi aad pit mind,Dyevvy Bower,Stevie Locker,Alan McGuire ,and Micky, they were a canny set of youngun's,they were aal on timber-leading and shaft-bottom work,they aal got on doon the pit and oot thi pit,same as aa did wi my Marra's at Choppington High Pit,working together underground,and oot on motorbikes most nights in the summer nights,and oot for waaks wi the dogs when we weren't biking.

Aam sorry ti hear of the lads who passed on too soon in life.

Thi pits had a comradeship like no other industry..other than the Armed Forces,methinks.

Jammy,me and Wor Lass usually have UK GOLD on the DAB radio in the hoose,it's constantly 1960-70's..aal day lang.

We have an APP called "TUNE-IN" on our phones,it's aal 60's and the sound quality is only as good as the cans you wear...obviously the speakers are crap,better than none!, but a decent set of cans sound great...ti my 75 year aad deef lugs enywheh!!..oh!...and that  app is a free download.[Check it oot..]

Mebbe the Gold you mention,is the same station,but with UK pre-fix to the Station name for Radio.

Alan,I didn't know Raymie Tyrie,but a worked wi a lad at Choppington High Pit,in the very early 1960's,caaled Ken Tyrie,he was a young apprentice Fitter.

He lives doon Grange Park noo,wud Raymie be his Brother?,also was Val a wee bonny dark haired lass wi an attractive tooth-gap..used ti gaan ti the Clayton Ballroom skating on a Wednesday neets,where aa met my Wife,who was friendly with a lass called Val..an unusual name among the crowd aa kew..?..[my Lass also has the tooth-gap which attracted me the first time aa saw her!!...but she hates it!!]

A think at that time,my Val was gaan wi one of Davy Bower/Stevie Locker's marra's  nickamed "Butch",he was a smashing natured lad,like aal he's Marra's...but they were aal only aboot 16 or 17 yrs aad...if they were that!!

A still see Ronnie Ince noo and again,at the station...nivvor seen any of the other lads for decades since thi aad Pit closed.

Cheers,and Stay Safe ,folks!

Bill.

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There have been a lot of suggestions as to the whereabouts of Puddlers Row at Bedlington Station.  Just to add to the confusion,

Evan Martin in his book Bedlingtonshire Remembered says the following (page 57) in relation to the Barrington and Choppington brickworks:

"Local worthies Dr James Trotter and Thomas Glassey, encouraged miners to take shares in brick companies. Glassey himself bought Puddlers. Row at Bank Top and renamed it Glassey Terrace before emigrating to Queensland". 

PS Thanks for the tip-off, Eggy. A thoroughly good read!

Edited by Canny lass

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On 02/11/2013 at 19:32, tullybrone said:

Hi,

I started this message on its own topic thread earlier today nut have ben advised to attach it to this thread as it mentions Phoenix Row.....

"I'm looking for some help in working out which Bedlington colliery my relatives worked at pre 1914.

On the 1911 census my great uncle Peter Devlin, born Workington, Cumberland, 1893 is living at 1 Phoenix Row, Bedlington Station lodging with a Wills family, employed as a Coal Miner (Putter) Underground. There are some 50 Workington born people in Bedlington on the census.

He was joined by his widowed mother and youngest brother Frank Devlin, born 1897, later that year after his brother left school. Frank joined him to work at a local pit.

Frank enlisted in 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers in May 1914, aged 16 years. He was killed in action with 1st NF at Bazentin Le Grand, Somme, France Friday 14th July 1916, aged 18 years.

Peter enlisted in 1st Battalion Tyneside Scottish (20th NF) in October 1914. He was killed in action at La Boisselle, Somme, France Saturday 1st July 1916, aged 23 years.

I have recently obtained the soldiers will made by Frank Devlin in January 1915 before he went to France with 2nd NF. He gives his mothers address as 13 Clayton Street, Bedlington Station.

The 1911 census shows a Front and Back Clayton Street. I think they were close to Phoenix Row as they are listed on consecutive pages.

I know that miners homes were in effect "tied cottages" so I am hoping that someone will be able to help me with the ownership of the Phoenix Row and Clayton Street houses and perhaps be able to narrow it down to a colliery where my relatives would have been working before they joined the army.

They are commemorated on a memorial at St Bede's RC Church, Bedlington.

I'd appreciate any assistance.

Thanks.

Steve Y,

Maghull,

Merseyside"

@tullybrone - whilst searching for some info I have just noticed your comment asking about Phoenix Row, Clayton Street and what local pit your relatives would have been working at. Looks like your comments were lost among the other topics that were active at the time. If you are still accessing the site and still looking for info I will see if I can help you.🙂  

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1 hour ago, Canny lass said:

There have been a lot of suggestions as to the whereabouts of Puddlers Row at Bedlington Station.  Just to add to the confusion,

Evan Martin in his book Bedlingtonshire Remembered says the following (page 57) in relation to the Barrington and Choppington brickworks:

"Local worthies Dr James Trotter and Thomas Glassey, encouraged miners to take shares in brick companies. Glassey himself bought Puddlers. Row at Bank Top and renamed it Glassey Terrace before emigrating to Queensland". 

 

I'm sure we have some info on the naming of Glassey Terrace  in an old topic. Will have to have a search:) 

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On 30/05/2013 at 19:12, Reedy said:

I have been reliably informed that the streets which were located around the 'Bank Top' area were as follows -

Starting at what used to be Joe Jennings farm and shop including Mansion House now possibly 'Smiles' was Glassey Terrace. The first 7 houses were originally named Howard Terrace but the name was changed to Glassey Terrace as a result of misdirected mail as another Howard Terrace existed in Netherton.

Families living in Glassey Tce in the 1940s/1950s were -

1 - Storey

2 - Jobson

3 - Storey

4 - Watson

5 - Tait

6 -

7 - Hedley

8 - Moscrop

9 - Proudlock

10 - Hedley

11 - Andrews

12 - Brown

13 - Gregg

14 - Morton

15 - Gibson

16 - Wonford

Next came the Bank Top Hotel(opened in 1903) Landlord J McKenna.

To the left of the Bank Top pub was a row of about 4 cottages occupied by families McSparron, Cole and Thompson. These cottages were next to the Puddlers Arms which contained flats occupied by Bell, McGregor, Miller , Rooney. These were also known as Craggs Buildings. This collection of homes including the Puddlers Arms were eventually cleared to make way for what is now River View Close.

 

Staying on the right hand side of the road next came 'Puddlers Row'. These houses ran as far as number 2 Stead Lane across the area at the top of what is now Tomlea Avenue where the cottages are.

Families in Puddlers Row approx mid 1950s (some show numerous or duplicate names as families moved or swapped houses)-

1 - McGarry/McAndrews

2 - Donohoe

3 - McCafferty

4 - Conomy

5 - Noon/Odonnell/Tellum

6 - Thain/Furness

7 - Neary

8 - Mullarkey/Smallman

9 - Bellerby

10 -Carey

11 - Murphy/Bolam

12 - Nicholson

13 - Weatheritt

14 - Kelly/Snowdon

15 - Kinghorn/McCafferty

16 - Oliver

17 - Birch/Mulholland/Mole

18 - Easton/Craze

19 - Smallman/Walker/McCafferty

20 - Mullarkey/Earl

These houses led onto Stead Lane with the even numbers on the right as you headed towards Bedlington and the odd numbers (Doyles Shop side)on the left.

Please note the information was compiled by my Father (who is now 84 years old and has lived at the Bank Top all his life)and a few old family friends whose names appear in the lists of families. I cannot comment on their accuracy or the exact dates as no records were used only 'grey matter' and memories.

@Canny lass - I think this was the info I had stuck in my memory = @Reedy's dads info.

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On 18/09/2020 at 20:46, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

@tullybrone - whilst searching for some info I have just noticed your comment asking about Phoenix Row, Clayton Street and what local pit your relatives would have been working at. Looks like your comments were lost among the other topics that were active at the time. If you are still accessing the site and still looking for info I will see if I can help you.🙂  

Hi,

Thanks very much for the offer Alan. I'm still in the dark (no mining pun intended) as to which pit my great uncles worked at and have always assumed it was Doctor Pit as that is the only Bedlington pit I've seen mentioned so if you can assist in any way I'd be very grateful.

Thanks.

Steve

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2 hours ago, tullybrone said:

Hi,

Thanks very much for the offer Alan. I'm still in the dark (no mining pun intended) as to which pit my great uncles worked at and have always assumed it was Doctor Pit as that is the only Bedlington pit I've seen mentioned so if you can assist in any way I'd be very grateful.

Thanks.

Steve

Steve - I am no historian only know about where I was born and raised, Bedlington Station area, and can occasionally remember bits and piesces that have been posted within this site and the local Facebook group Bygone Bedlington.

I will see what I can find and will update you over the next few days.

Whilst I am searching I can tell you that Phoenix Row (can't remember having seen the name on any old maps) was Bedlington Station (previously know as Sleekburn) and if that is where your relatives lived then it would most likely have been Bedlington 'A' Pit where they worked.

There were two pits - The Doctor Pit is what the locals know as Bedlington Top End. I will post some photos and info later.

There is a site called the Durham Mining Museum (DMM) and it has records of all the pits in the Northumberland and Durham area. Unfortunately it doesn't have names of all who worked there the only names it records are those who lost their lives at each of the pits. This is a link to the DMM site :-  http://www.dmm.org.uk/collnear/b022.htm                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

You will find using the search facility, top right hand corner, useful. Searching for a phrase then use quotation marks eg. "Phoenix Row" otherwise the system up all references to the words input  - searching for a single word then quotes not required.

                                Alan

 

Edited by Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

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On 18/09/2020 at 20:06, Canny lass said:

Evan Martin in his book Bedlingtonshire Remembered says the following (page 57) in relation to the Barrington and Choppington brickworks:

"Local worthies Dr James Trotter and Thomas Glassey, encouraged miners to take shares in brick companies. Glassey himself bought Puddlers. Row at Bank Top and renamed it Glassey Terrace before emigrating to Queensland". 

I thought that i'd finished my research on Puddlers Row way back in August 2017 (earlier in this topic). However, because of Evans' statement I've had another look. 

If Glassey bought Puddlers Row and renamed it Glassey Terrace, then it was not the Glassey terrace which we know today. Glassey terrace doesn't appear on OS maps until the period between 1897 - 1922 and by then Glassey  had left Bedlington having emigrated down under in 1884. Glassey must have bought the old Puddlers Row which fronted the main road exactly opposite the present Glassey Terrace - the site now occupied by Melrose Avenue.

The present Glassey Terrace may well have taken over the name but was originally built as Front Row, as far as I can deduce from the OS series of maps.

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@Canny lass - the more maps I look at on the Old maps & NLS sites it just gets more confusing. I think the cartographers of that period must have spent the afternoons in the local pub discussing, :argue: , what would go where:hug:.

I looked at two maps today and the 1897 shows Puddlers Row where @Jammy new it, just off Stead Lane, and the 1865 map shows Puddlers Row where Glassey Terrace is now:rolleyes:.

1897 Puddlers Row.jpg

1865 Puddlers Row.jpg

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21 hours ago, tullybrone said:

Hi,

Thanks very much for the offer Alan. I'm still in the dark (no mining pun intended) as to which pit my great uncles worked at and have always assumed it was Doctor Pit as that is the only Bedlington pit I've seen mentioned so if you can assist in any way I'd be very grateful.

Thanks.

Steve

@tullybrone - I see I had seen your enquiry before, under your posting of 

Bedlington Station - Miners Houses Ownership

back in 2013 and you were asked to move it to the Puddler's Raa[Row] topic.

As you will have noticed one topic often gets diverted and mixed up with others. I will post my first info on Phoenix Row under your original topic - Bedlington Station - Miners Houses Ownerships - rather than continue mixing it up with this one.  

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3 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

looked at two maps today and the 1897 shows Puddlers Row where @Jammy new it, just off Stead Lane, and the 1865 map shows Puddlers Row where Glassey Terrace is now:rolleyes:.

These are two different Puddlers Row. The 'old' Puddlers Row is also shown on the 1859 map but unlike the 'new' Puddlers it is on the east side of the main road. The old Puddlers Row belonged not to Bedlington Station/Sleekburn, but to 'Village of Bank Top', according to census information, and was there before Glassey's arrival in 1867. It appears in the 1871 census as a row of 22 dwellings.

Glassey left Bedlington in 1884 and the old Puddlers Row still appears on OS maps in 1898 but without a name. On the same map the new Puddlers Row appears running east-west along what later became Stead Lane. We can also see here that the west side of the road, north of the Bank Top Hotel, is still not developed.

At some point between 1897 and 1922 we can see a devlopment on the west side of the road - the area now occupied by Glassey Terrace. This is called Front Row. New development on the east side of the road in the area of the old Puddlers Row, includes a 'Back Row' and what could be old Puddlers Row but with an extension. By 1947 Puddlers Row is no longer shown on the OS maps and Front Row is still called Front Row - not Glassey Terrace.

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      According to Public Health England data covering the seven days to September 22, Newcastle now has the highest rate of infection in the North East and the fifth-highest in England – with the city’s numbers almost tripling.
      Newcastle recorded 632 new cases in that week, with an infection rate of 208.7 per 100,000 people. That was compared to 224 new cases and a rate of 74 in the previous 7 days.
      South Tyneside had previously had the second-highest rate in England, but is now eighth according to the latest figures. The borough recorded 301 new cases with an infection rate of 199.4 per 100,000.

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