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Canny lass

Origin Of The Bedlington Name [Split From: The Nail]

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Whilst searching for other stuff on Bedlington came across this in the  http://www.sixtmedia.org.uk/page7.php site

The name Bedlington is of Saxon origin, as are the names of most of the places in the surrounding parishes. The names of families enter largely into the composition of local place names. It appears there was a tribe of Saxons called Baedlings, and Bedlington would mean the town were the Baedlings lived.

and can't find any reference to this explanation of the Bedlington name on this site.

 

I searched for the word 'Baedlings' and found this site :- 

A Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language: Containing the ...
books.google.co.uk/books?id=YIALAAAAMAAJ
Joseph Bosworth - 1838 - ‎Anglo-Saxon language
 

Books on Google Play

A Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language: Containing the Accentuation - the Grammatical Inflections - the Irregular Words Referred to Their Themes - the Parallel Terms, from the Other Gothic Languages - the Meaning of the Anglo-Saxon in English and Latin - and Copious English and Latin Indexes, Serving as a Dictionary of English and Anglo-Saxon, as Well as of Latin and Anglo-Saxon (Google eBook)

 

Front Cover

Joseph Bosworth

post-3031-0-93937900-1392324537_thumb.jp

Within this you get the explanation :-

Anglo-Saxon dictionary = Baedling, [baed or bed a bed, ling from linigan to lie]

1. A delicate fellow, tenderling, one who lies much in bed; homo delicatus. Baedlingas effeminate….

2. A carrier of letters, as if derived from baed a prayer, or command, ling from linigan or lingan to lie, lie under, tend,, bring; tabellarius

 

If you then check out 'delicatus' we find the Bedlington males are Slaves that enjoy servicing both Master and Mistress.

 

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Anglo-Saxon dictionary = Baedling, [baed or bed a bed, ling from linigan to lie]


1. A delicate fellow, tenderling, one who lies much in bed; homo delicatus. Baedlingas effeminate….


2. A carrier of letters, as if derived from baed a prayer, or command, ling from linigan or lingan to lie, lie under, tend,, bring; tabellarius


 


If you then check out 'delicatus' we find the Bedlington males are Slaves that enjoy servicing both Master and Mistress.


 


So is that why I dress up in women's clothes on a Friday night, Eggy?


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Eggy sometimes the so called experts get it wrong.

They form opinions based on limited knowledge.

Remember not a lot was written down and they can make guesses that become fact!

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Eggy sometimes the so called experts get it wrong.

They form opinions based on limited knowledge.

Remember not a lot was written down and they can make guesses that become fact!

but Keith dressed up on a Friday night, nothing quite as delicatus as that.

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Here's one,

 

the brother of Attila the HUN came over here (440AD ish) after being exiled for trying to top his brother and set up a colony, along with his favourite dwarf!  

 

Bleda's Tun.  

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Maggie, i Think we can Believe Bosworth. His work is still a leading source of information within linguistics. It's almost a couple of hundred years old but is still reprinted, with amendments and modifications, even today.

 

However, let's not be mislead by the entry quoted by Eggy (good work finding that Eggy). 'Baed'  has other meanings. For example it's also the past tense of a verb 'beddan' which means to pray.   Still used in the Scandinavian languages as 'bad' (prayed) and even in the English language, albeit archaic, as 'bade' (asked).

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Maybe that is significant Canny Lass.

The meaning 'Pray'

Saint Cuthbert's body here in Bedlington , maybe led to 'praying' and an early church (wooden)

Then maybe Bede took his name from the word or from our own little town.

Either way experts can only guess at life so long ago.

The names of places are often the only evidence.

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In Old English Bede is actually spelled 'Baed' and comes from the Word meaning to pray. However, I Think Cuthbert was his pupil so Bede was probably named before Cuthbert died. Didn't Bede die Before Cuthbert?

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Bede was only 15 when Cuthbert croked and he lived for another 48 years.  Tony Robinson's latest telly show, Walking Through History, explained what happened as he walked from ChillyJockoland, across the border,  into Northumberland, and over to Lindisfarne.

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Cuthbert born 634, croaked 687

Bede born 672, croaked 735.

 

Apologies for the spelling mistake of croaked in post #34 ... it's good to keep these things correct, especially for our younger viewers shackled to text spelling.

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