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I have been trying to trace information on my family name MARLEY and would apprciate if any person has any information?

Grandfather was Joseph born approx 1897 married to Myra Froggatt and according to the 1911 census my Great Grandfather was John James born approx 1864 married to Hannah Jobson and lived at 44 Shiney (Shiney as spelt in the census) Row Bedlington.

Early 1960's I can remember staying in Bedlington with my dad's aunt Sal or Sally also visiting my Great Grandmother who was looked after by Jean somewhere near the station (more than 50 years so the memory is not too good) Dad's name was Gilbert Ross Marley.

Visited the Bedlington cemetry today and found quite a few Marley headstones so maybe there are still Marley's living in the area.

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My wife remembers the name, it came up in earlier discussions somewhere on this forum, Wilf ran the Humford baths and another worked for the council, the grandfather lived in or near "The Old Hallâ€

Yes the Marleys lived at Humford in the house adjoining the baths (house is still there). Keith L. Should also remember Billy and Anne from the Whitley school. Anne was in my class.
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As Symptoms says; but my first port of call would be that nasty piece of Thatcherite privatisation BT - where it costs nothing! :)

http://www.thephoneb...ngton&x=48&y=21

And, where #7 looks interesting. :mobile:

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I have been trying to trace information on my family name MARLEY and would apprciate if any person has any information?

Grandfather was Joseph born approx 1897 married to Myra Froggatt and according to the 1911 census my Great Grandfather was John James born approx 1864 married to Hannah Jobson and lived at 44 Shiney (Shiney as spelt in the census) Row Bedlington.

Early 1960's I can remember staying in Bedlington with my dad's aunt Sal or Sally also visiting my Great Grandmother who was looked after by Jean somewhere near the station (more than 50 years so the memory is not too good) Dad's name was Gilbert Ross Marley.

Visited the Bedlington cemetry today and found quite a few Marley headstones so maybe there are still Marley's living in the area.

There's a Marley on the Football team photo recently added to the Gallery.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Mr [bill?]Marley was my class teacher at West ridge County Secondary School from 1956-1959 when i left at 15 years of age.

He wasn't very tall,but was stocky as hell,and i don't mean fat,i mean muscly-stocky!

He could quieten the "big lads" in the class,who made all the noise in his abscence,by just opening the door to the classroom,and walking in.....it went deathly quiet....nothing said,no need to shout...just stare at them!!

Last time i saw him was at a funeral in Saint Cuthbert's church in Bedlington,a few years ago,and he hadn't changed one little bit..just white-haired!

Wonder if he is related to you?

The school is now St Bennet Biscop catholic school.

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Just remembered,the Manager's clerk at Choppington B colliery in the late '50s/early 60's was called Jimmy Marley,and my Wife has a lady friend with the Marley name,whose Husband passed away a few years ago,lives on Wansbeck estate.

Hope this is of some help somehow.

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One of the Marleys from the Humford Mill Baths worked at Cleeswell Hill school a few years ago.

The Marleys who were teachers at Westridge lived at Nedderton

Hi, Maggie, welcome to the site. It was Bill Marley who was a teacher at Cleeswell Hill I believe. I know he was at the Grammer School.

Edited by keith lockey
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  • 1 month later...

Here is a Marley story covered by Sixtownships . Hope it is of use

The Life and Times of George Marley of Bedlington

Standing up to the waist in water for 13 hours a day and never seeing daylight from one week-end to another. That's an example of the typical mining conditions of over 110 years ago. The memories are from a then 83 year old, Mr. George Marley, of 9a Allgood Terrace, Bedlington.

"Bah†he said. "The miners today [1939] are gentlemen. There were no eight hour shifts when I was a lad and I often had to work in flooded places and walk home soaked to the skin.â€

During his 61 years at the Dr. Pit, Bedlington, this veteran filled the majority of jobs connected with the colliery. He was born in Bedlington in 1856, and started work on the heap at the age of ten.

In his working career he broke almost every bone in his body and lost the sight of one eye, but he still thought that that the modern conditions had not brought down the number of accidents within the mines.

However, Mr. Marley's chief claim to fame was through his love of music. He possessed a powerful tenor voice and was choirmaster at the Church of Christ for over 60 years.

His musical career started at the age of seven when he was one of the first to join a juvenile drum and pipe band founded at Bebside by a popular local musician Mr. Harry Graham. The band used to hold their meetings in an old stable at Bebside and toured the district playing at dances and concerts.

While a boy, he joined the choir of the old Free Methodist Church at Bedlington, later to take charge of the choir. He was an accomplished pianist and flutist and had a useful knowledge of orchestration and composition.

One of his proudest achievements was recorded in 1937 by his pupil, Miss Spratt of Cambois who secured her L.R.A.M. certificate when only 13 years old.

His niece, Miss Nancy Marley, who moved to Australia, had a fine contralto voice. She made numerous tours of the northern concert platforms and even broadcasted several times on B.B.C. She also was an announcer on Australian radio.

Mr. Marley had been a Good Templar all his life, and had also been a committee member of the Bedlington Co-operative Society for over 40 years.

More stories at our website

http://www.sixtownships.org.uk

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Somewhere I have a book on the Bedlington Coop.

My great uncle has his picture in it.

The coop movement was hugely important in providing the essentials of life.

Your story about George Marley is very good.

An example of what we should all be doing about our own lives.

There is a sense of community when the connections with your family go back so far.

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Tony. i got a book on the co-op movement a one from Bedlington, i think its a centenary book. or maybe 50 years, but its inone of my storage boxes.

It gives a good insight into the co-op and your spot on with what you quote.

There is another interesting book i was reading from the library. ( the peoples store) a fantastic book on the co-op and different areas are in this edition. Superb it is

i think i got it from Bedlington Library Tony. If you are interested in the co-op its a must-read

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Hi, Maggie, welcome to the site. It was Bill Marley who was a teacher at Cleeswell Hill I believe. I know he was at the Grammer School.

Bills mam is a lovely lass. I don't know if shes still alive, but a lovely lass indeed and a keen interest in history of our area.

My wife was in the kitchens at Cleasewell Hill and he liked a good helping did Bill.

He liked his puddings too.

I think he drinks in the Sun Inn, Bedlington, and that was the last time i seen him.

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Bills mam is a lovely lass. I don't know if shes still alive, but a lovely lass indeed and a keen interest in history of our area.

My wife was in the kitchens at Cleasewell Hill and he liked a good helping did Bill.

He liked his puddings too.

I think he drinks in the Sun Inn, Bedlington, and that was the last time i seen him.

Bill's mum Joan is still with us, but Bill does not drink in the Sun Inn anymore and he has always liked a large helping when i comes to bait. (He is my 2nd Cousin or something like that)

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Bill's mum Joan is still with us, but Bill does not drink in the Sun Inn anymore and he has always liked a large helping when i comes to bait. (He is my 2nd Cousin or something like that)

Nothing wrong with a large helping.

I will have to cut down on mine tho, Im too heavy now

its nice to know that bill and his mam are fine too, as i said earlier, just lovely people

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