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keith lockey

Hartford Hall History

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Can anyone put me onto a good site for Hartford Hall history. Everytime I google it I get real estate. I've found some but they are sporadic and not what i want. One thing I want to know about is this mysterious gray lady ghost. Cheers all.

Edited by keith lockey

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Hartford Hall was built in 1811 for William Burdon it was built of stone from Hartford Quarry . After the Burdon family left in the 1930 Mr .Thompson of Red Stamps Stores leased the Hall . in 1939 / 45 the Army used the Hall

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Hartford Hall Grey Lady Ghost? You sure you're not getting mixed up with Delaval Hall, Keith?

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Hartford Hall Grey Lady Ghost? You sure you're not getting mixed up with Delaval Hall, Keith?

That's the point, Mercuryg. It was my brother who told me about the gray lady of Hartford Hall. I had never heard of it - but I had read about the white lady of Delaval Hall. To be honest I cannot find a thing about the gray lady so maybe my brother has gotten mixed up. That's why I flagged it up on this site - to see if anyone knew anything.

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Interesting; a quick google returns this entry....

Haunted Hotels in North West England

www.nightsinthepast.com/haunted_hotels_north_west.htmlShare

Originally a manor house and nunnery, Hartford Hall is situated in the village of the ... Otherworldly residents include a grey lady known affectionately as "Lady ...

However, that Hartford Hall is not our Hartford Hall!

I must say I have an interest in such things, and have read many books on the subject, and have never come across a mention of Hartford Hall.

(BTW, how are you these days? We used to be acquainted some years ago, Northumberland Arms, I am the legendary Deaf Steve....)

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Interesting; a quick google returns this entry....

Haunted Hotels in North West England

www.nightsinthepast.com/haunted_hotels_north_west.htmlShare

Originally a manor house and nunnery, Hartford Hall is situated in the village of the ... Otherworldly residents include a grey lady known affectionately as "Lady ...

However, that Hartford Hall is not our Hartford Hall!

I must say I have an interest in such things, and have read many books on the subject, and have never come across a mention of Hartford Hall.

(BTW, how are you these days? We used to be acquainted some years ago, Northumberland Arms, I am the legendary Deaf Steve....)

Hi Legendary Deaf Steve, how are you? Thanks for the link. I have a few books and sites as well on the subject but nothing on this mysterious gray lady at H H. My brother used to work there for a while and he says the story was well known by the staff. Something about a woman throwing herself off the dome!!! As Toyah Wilcox said "It's a mystery, It's a mystery."

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Hartford Hall was built for William Burdon in 1811 to a disign by William Stokoe of Newcastle upon Tyne.

It was built of stone from Hartford Quarry and erected on land owned by Mr Burdon's mother, who was a Wharton.

IT actually was called Hartford House and only became Hartford Hall when the old Hall on the south side of the river was demolished in 1850.

Augustus Burdon was responsible for the buildings changes over the years to what we knew it before being converted into many houses for private families.

Augustus Burdon was a keen freemason and it was he who built onto the original building beginning in about 1878.

The building project was a huge task and he included a gentlemans residence in the programme.

A huge reception room was built replacing the cottage at the west end.

Extensive servants quarters were built too replacing the much smaller ones on the east end.

Various conservatories were erected too throughout the property.

The original stable block was also replaced and moved to the eat away from the Hall.

The wrought iron gates, a very touchy subject these days, when they were removed and never replaced, were purchased from the Paris Art Exhibition in 1859.

On the south face of the east wall there was a sundial, i don't know if it is still there, but this dated 1783. It was said to come from a site very near to the Hall, but where i cannot say as my research

came to a dead-end.

The Burdons eventually left Hartford Hall and it was leased to a Mr Thompson who owned the grocery chain of Thompson Stores in the early 1930's.

Thompson Stores were famous for there Red Stamp Stores saving stamps.

The Hall was used by the army during WWII and also became a rehabilitation centre for coal miners injured in the mines. (I was there in 1981 under Mr. Calder, after a shotfiring accident at Whittle Colliery)

It wasn't just miners tho, police officers used it and many other people in need of the swervices provided. These services were second to none and helped a huge ammount of people.

Oh, a small point to note here is that there was a indoor school in the old stable block, and it made a fantastic gym, for to help in the treatment of injured people.

I mention the Quarry. This was opposite the main gates and it provided a high quality yellow sandstone. It was about 3 acres.

First use of this stone dates to around 1736 when it was used for the Netherton area.

Back to Hartford Hall. The stone from the quarry, used to build the Hall, was also used to repair the Houses of Parliament and two London Bridges in the early part of the 1800's.

This was confimed in an article dated 1859 from a London Newspaper.

It said the stone was transported by rail from Plessey Station.

The quarry consited of three cottages too. One at the north end of the quarry, in the woods, another was actually in the quarry and the third was just south of Pegwhistle Burn.

I have more information on Hartford Hall and the cottages and also the old military camp. But thats for another day.

Hope this helps you in your research.

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John,

When I did my research on the gates I read they were made for and exhibited at the Vienna exhibition 1873 (incidentally another exhibitor at that show was a certain Mr Longridge) and I presumed fitted during or just before the big Hall refit of 1875?

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John,

When I did my research on the gates I read they were made for and exhibited at the Vienna exhibition 1873 (incidentally another exhibitor at that show was a certain Mr Longridge) and I presumed fitted during or just before the big Hall refit of 1875?

You are spot on in Mr Longridge. What a man he was. His vision too.

I don't think Bedlington gets the credit it deserves in what the Bedlington Furnace was a

ll about in the way of engineering and its contribution to the railways.

Fantastic pioneers were connected to the Furnace, as you know Malcolm, and their achievements should be more recognised for what they did for Bedlington.

I am proud of our area Malcolm.

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John,

Great, I really hope you are going to help make this Heritage initiative the very best it can be and show why everyone here should be proud of their history and culture. Given half the chance we will put Bedlington and the local area into its rightful position and that's not second best to anywhere else!

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yep. BTW still got the SunInn arttefacts here and looking to do something to mark its 100 years.

A little film ?

members off here to play a role, voice overs, dress up old time.

What you think. We could even have our own Jocker writing the letters and what hes wrote. Got footage for explosions underground to begin with, but what do the members think ?

Lets know we got 4 weeks in Jan and Feb to shoot maybe.

Lets know

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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yep. BTW still got the SunInn arttefacts here and looking to do something to mark its 100 years.

A little film ?

members off here to play a role, voice overs, dress up old time.

What you think. We could even have our own Jocker writing the letters and what hes wrote. Got footage for explosions underground to begin with, but what do the members think ?

Lets know we got 4 weeks in Jan and Feb to shoot maybe.

Lets know

John.

Don`t forget there is this also:

http://www.newspostleader.co.uk/community/triple-murder-to-air-on-new-radio-station-1-4289326

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Lone Ranger,

Try this............

Write what you want to say in this box, its open under the topic you are reading, its a quick reply.

Write something and then click Post, that's the black button on lower right-hand side.

Don't go to reply options and don't hit quote, lets get the basics right first.

I can edit your postings if you make mistakes until we get it right.

If you insist on using More Reply Options and Quote, DO NOT CLICK ON "REPORT". Just click on Submit that way it gets posted up on the boards not referred to us for moderation.

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For the member looking for info on Hartford Hall.

Heres a little more on Augustus Edward Burdon.

Hope it helps you out.

Few county gentleman were better known or highly respected in Northumberland than Augustus Edward Burdon. In all that appertained to agriculture he took a deep interest, while the public life of the North laid in him one of it's most devoted servants.

A keen student of the social and political movements of the times, he was a well known figure at public gatherings, and when he spoke he was listened to with the respect that his knowledge and attainment commanded. He held a high position in the Masonic craft, and also took a prominent place at leading society functions.

He was the son of Colonel Augustus de Butts of the Madras Engineers, his mother being Hannah Georgina Elizabeth, daughter of Admiral Inglefield, C.B., a distinguished officer in the British Navy.

Intended for service in the army, he was educated at Sandhurst. For a time he served in the 17th Lancers, but eventually left the army. His retirement did not, however, produce a lessened interest in military matters. He became an officer in the Northumberland Hussars, and rose to the position of Major.

In 1870 he assumed by Royal Licence the surname of Burdon. He married in 1875 Alice Gertrude, third daughter of Major Thos. Pakenham Vandeleur of Bellfield, County Limerick.

Mr. Burdon had been for many years a county magistrate, carrying out the duties connected therewith at Bedlington, where he later became the presiding justice. He was High Sheriff of Northumberland in 1908. Other public duties included that of representative of Bedlington on the Northumberland County Council, and a member of the Standing Joint Committee.

His interest in Freemasonry was great and extended over many years. He was Provincial Grand Master in Craft Masonry for Northumberland, succeeding the Right Hon. Viscount Ridley. In addition, he held high office in Mark Masonry, being a Past Grand Warden of the Province of Northumberland and Durham. He was also an officer of the Grand Lodge of England.

Major Burdon devoted great attention to political affairs. He was an active supporter of Conservatism in the North and had often been asked to come forward as a candidate for Parliament, but he always declined.

The affairs of the Primrose League found in him a whole-hearted supporter. He was Ruling Councillor of Bedlington Habitation from it's formation, and during the summer season with Mrs. Burdon, entertained the members at garden parties at Hartford House.

He was chairman of the Wansbeck Division Conservative Association and a member of the executive committee of Northumberland Division of the National Association. The popular president of the Northumberland Lawn Tennis Association, Major Burdon, assisted by his wife, was of great service in bringing the organisation to success.

He succeeded Lord Armstrong in that office, which was formerly held by Richard Clayton. In addition to Hartford Hall, near Bedlington, Major Burdon had seats at Wooperton, Newbiggin and at Prior Hall, Penrith.

His kindly disposition and constant desire to help in every deserving cause made him extremely popular with all classes, while his unassuming nature prevented him from accepting public honours, for which his abilities and position made him in every way qualified.

In November 1908 he went to London for the purpose of undergoing an operation, but the doctors advised that he should return home, and the operation performed there. For a month his health had not been satisfactory, but none except his close friends knew the gravity of his ailments and his sudden death in December 1908, came as a great shock to them all.

He was survived by his wife and a family, a daughter being the wife of the Hon. Arthur Joicey, eldest son of Lord Joicey of Ford Castle.

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An old relative now deceased, said the gates at Hartford were shiny when she first used to see them!

Never been able to confirm.

Pity they are no longer there or anywhere in the town.

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Sounds interesting

I have a book on Plessey and more, must do some work (research)!

My mother worked at Hartford Hall and a cousin worked in the Gym (repair)

It is a wonderful house in a fantastic position.

Also the tales of Ken Russell and the filming of Women in Love.

Ken Russell did a follow up on his filming.

The Main Street had Maureen Shelly's butchers shop looking distressed and boarded up!

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