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Beck

"bedlington Old Church"

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Greetings!

I'm hoping someone here can help me make sense of some local history. I'm in the U.S., but my ancestors hail from Northumberland. I have a Bible record that lists a marriage in 1894 as taking place at "Bedlington Old Church." Using those literal search terms turns up no such church. I do not know if this is because the church no longer exists or perhaps that they were referring to the church colloquially rather than by its proper name. I also did not know if back then "Bedlington" would have had a wider geographical meaning?

So, back in 1894, if someone referred to the "Bedlington Old Church," to what would they be referring?

Many thanks to anyone who can shed some light. I greatly look forward to visiting this church, should I ever track it down!

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Look in Bedlington Community→Town & Around→History Hollow in this site, look for "1844 Bedlington History"

Hi Vic, yes, I believe St. Cuthberts would be the old church; it dates back to c 900 AD I believe. I have some photos and info somewhere in the house and I will post these up on this site when I can. Unfortunately I am decorating at the moment and can't find anything. Watch this space.

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Greetings!

I'm hoping someone here can help me make sense of some local history. I'm in the U.S., but my ancestors hail from Northumberland. I have a Bible record that lists a marriage in 1894 as taking place at "Bedlington Old Church." Using those literal search terms turns up no such church. I do not know if this is because the church no longer exists or perhaps that they were referring to the church colloquially rather than by its proper name. I also did not know if back then "Bedlington" would have had a wider geographical meaning?

So, back in 1894, if someone referred to the "Bedlington Old Church," to what would they be referring?

Many thanks to anyone who can shed some light. I greatly look forward to visiting this church, should I ever track it down!

post-2953-0-71145800-1343216248_thumb.jp

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Hope the attached photo and info is of use. It comes from the book Images of England - BEDLINGTONSHIRE - compiled by Evan Martin. PS - Sorry if this comes in two parts I am having problems with my computer.

Edited by keith lockey

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Hi Vic, yes, I believe St. Cuthberts would be the old church; it dates back to c 900 AD I believe. I have some photos and info somewhere in the house and I will post these up on this site when I can. Unfortunately I am decorating at the moment and can't find anything. Watch this space.

From 900 AD....... well you must be about due a new camera then Keith .

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He'll be pleased that it has served you well. He will be having a well earned break from fighting with the mammys at Bennies while the school hols are on ...... oops wrong Merlin, wheres he hiding anyway cos he's not tipped up on here for a while ?

Edited by keith

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Thank you everyone for your replies, photos, and links! It is so difficult to understand the geography of a country from overseas, let alone how that geography and related terminology might have changed over the years. Your replies have been very helpful! The more I learn about your area, the more eager I am to visit and explore! I can't wait for the day my research brings me there! Thanks again! Cheers!

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Thank you everyone for your replies, photos, and links! It is so difficult to understand the geography of a country from overseas, let alone how that geography and related terminology might have changed over the years. Your replies have been very helpful! The more I learn about your area, the more eager I am to visit and explore! I can't wait for the day my research brings me there! Thanks again! Cheers!

Good luck; wish you well.

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Beck,

If it is any help to you, I have a document here which tells me that the Incumbent at the time of the marriage was Charles Thomas Whitley (not sure if his surname has anything to do with the local town of Whitley Bay). He was incumbent of St Cuthbert's from 1854 until 1895.

This has supporting evidence from an archive page

In 1833 he was appointed Reader in Natural Philosophy and Mathematics in the new University of Durham, a post which he retained until 1855. He also filled a number of other university offices for various periods during those years - Librarian, Proctor, Tutor, and later Vice-Master of University College. He was ordained in 1836, and in 1849 became an honorary canon of Durham Cathedral. In 1854 he was appointed Vicar of Bedlington, Northumberland.

- Source -
http://archiveshub.a...902whitley.html

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Beck,

If it is any help to you, I have a document here which tells me that the Incumbent at the time of the marriage was Charles Thomas Whitley (not sure if his surname has anything to do with the local town of Whitley Bay). He was incumbent of St Cuthbert's from 1854 until 1895.

That's interesting Brettly. I've often wondered where the Whitley Memorial School got it's name. Could it have anything to do with him?

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That's interesting Brettly. I've often wondered where the Whitley Memorial School got it's name. Could it have anything to do with him?

In memory of Charles Thomas Whitley.....hmmm

Never even thought about that :)

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Beck,

If it is any help to you, I have a document here which tells me that the Incumbent at the time of the marriage was Charles Thomas Whitley (not sure if his surname has anything to do with the local town of Whitley Bay). He was incumbent of St Cuthbert's from 1854 until 1895.

This has supporting evidence from an archive page

In 1833 he was appointed Reader in Natural Philosophy and Mathematics in the new University of Durham, a post which he retained until 1855. He also filled a number of other university offices for various periods during those years - Librarian, Proctor, Tutor, and later Vice-Master of University College. He was ordained in 1836, and in 1849 became an honorary canon of Durham Cathedral. In 1854 he was appointed Vicar of Bedlington, Northumberland.

- Source -

well the whitley memorial and the village infants(derelect village hall) were both church of england schools and bedlington parish church St cuthberts was part of the dioses of durham so hence the connection there.

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Beck - try Google Maps (Church lane, Bedlington) and take a walk around the church and its environs.

Thank you, I will!

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Beck,

If it is any help to you, I have a document here which tells me that the Incumbent at the time of the marriage was Charles Thomas Whitley (not sure if his surname has anything to do with the local town of Whitley Bay). He was incumbent of St Cuthbert's from 1854 until 1895.

This has supporting evidence from an archive page

In 1833 he was appointed Reader in Natural Philosophy and Mathematics in the new University of Durham, a post which he retained until 1855. He also filled a number of other university offices for various periods during those years - Librarian, Proctor, Tutor, and later Vice-Master of University College. He was ordained in 1836, and in 1849 became an honorary canon of Durham Cathedral. In 1854 he was appointed Vicar of Bedlington, Northumberland.

- Source -

Thank you for the info!

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Yes it is Bedlington St. Cuthberts you are refering too.

Just a note that before Bedlington was fully developed the main road was through Vulcan Place and along Church Lane.

Did you know that Mr Hare, one of the duo of Burke and Hare, came to Bedlington in the summer of 1829.

He was recognised and the people of Bedlington that were around at the time chased him out of Bedlington by chasing him and throwing stones

and shouting.

He never came back to Bedlington.

I think his parner from Scotland "Burke" they were murderers and gave frsh bodies to the surgeons in those early days, was hung in early 1929, possibly January.

For some reason he left Scotland and as i say saw in Bedlington about the summer of 1929.

Got this record somewhere, but something not to be forgotten. They were evil them two.

Talking about stones in Bedlington, not the Jagger and Co :) the streets of Bedlington were cobled in those early days.

You had to watch when horses were about as they often flicked up stones and hit people on the body.

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