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johndawsonjune1955

Famous Bedlingtonshire People

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Just finished reading Barton Rafies little story on Joe Craddock. He broke the record for hand-filling coal.

This sparked my memory and this topic.

Lets put together some famous people from the area of Bedlingtonshire with their achievements.

It could be from records set, rescues, war time, industry or anything else.

We certainly have a few.

Barton Ralfie sparked me off with this topic, so here is one for him first.

I wonder how many people will recall the name of Thomas Edward Anderson ?. Thomas was born in 1882 at Barrington Colliery and went to work there at the age of 12 years. In 1901, at the age of 19, he decided to emigrate to America to seek better working conditions. After several jobs in the big Pennsylvania coalfields he settled down in a town called Robinson.

He was very interested in the Trade Union movement and became very active in the affairs of the United States Miners Union. For some time his views were not accepted and he was even expelled from the union for two years.

When he was reinstated he took the position of Chief Financial Secretary of the union. He held it for many years and died at his home in May 1956.

Thomas was interested in music when at Barrington, and played the violin. He played it regularly at Barrington, Choppington and Blyth districts.

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Just finished reading Barton Rafies little story on Joe Craddock. He broke the record for hand-filling coal.

This sparked my memory and this topic.

Lets put together some famous people from the area of Bedlingtonshire with their achievements.

It could be from records set, rescues, war time, industry or anything else.

We certainly have a few.

Barton Ralfie sparked me off with this topic, so here is one for him first.

I wonder how many people will recall the name of Thomas Edward Anderson ?. Thomas was born in 1882 at Barrington Colliery and went to work there at the age of 12 years. In 1901, at the age of 19, he decided to emigrate to America to seek better working conditions. After several jobs in the big Pennsylvania coalfields he settled down in a town called Robinson.

He was very interested in the Trade Union movement and became very active in the affairs of the United States Miners Union. For some time his views were not accepted and he was even expelled from the union for two years.

When he was reinstated he took the position of Chief Financial Secretary of the union. He held it for many years and died at his home in May 1956.

Thomas was interested in music when at Barrington, and played the violin. He played it regularly at Barrington, Choppington and Blyth districts.

Another famous violinist from the area was Kenneth Sillito, he went to Stakeford School, or so we were told by Grannie Green.Perhaps someone can confim this.

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Slightly off topic, but it was the reference to fiddlers that got my attention here. Anyone who plays the Northumbrian Small Pipes should know of a piper by the name of John Peacock. He hailed from Morpeth in the mid-1700's and is regarded as one of the finest pipers of all time, and very much a proponent of the development of the Northumberland Pipes as a popular instrument (he was also a prolifici fiddle player). Peacock is famous for authoring the very first book of music for the pipes - published around 1800 - which is regarded as the book that brough the pipes to greater public recognition.

Now, here's the Bedlington bit; a good friend of mine - I will not publish his name here - who lives in Bedlington has, in his posession, the original, hand written manuscript for this book. It is a fascinating manuscript, and rarely is it brought out into the open. I have been lucky enough to handle it, and it is a quite beautiful thing. The same gentleman is a violinist of the highest order - although he refers to himself as a fiddler - and plays in a well known Irish band , often with his beloved 1771 Guinarius.......

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This goalkeeper made a good name for himself in the lower end of football and went on to sign for bigger clubs. Anyone know anything more about him ?

This is all io have of interest, and i think he desrves his name on this topic.

In July 1956, Frank Higgs aged 43 years, of East Howden was found drowned in Northumberland Dock, North Shields. Frank was a former goalkeeper for Bedlington United and Seaton Delaval.

He joined Bedlington United in the 1927-28 season from a Northern Amateur Club, Howden Stead Memorial.

In 1928 he made the change to Seaton Delaval and immediately following his debut against Crawcrook Albion, he was transferred to Chelsea. Frank remained with Chelsea to the end of the 1929-30 season, and after that played in succession for the Irish League Club, Linfield, Barnsley, Manchester City, Aldershot, Walsall, Carlisle United and Southend United.

At the start of the 1938-39 season he joined Barrow, but after playing in their first eight Third Division games he received an injury which finished his career in professional football. He was a powerfully built goalkeeper, standing at 6ft 1inches in height and weighed 13 stone.

At his inquest there was no evidence to show how he came to be in the water and an open verdict was recorded.

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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The most famous person born in Bedlington has to be Daniel Gooch. He was Isambard Kingdom Brunel's chief engineer. Not only was he the Chairman of the Great Western Railway for over 30 years but was also involved in the laying of the first transatlantic telegraph cable and was a key figure in the industrialization of Britain.

A couple of weeks ago I was at Swindon and had a meal at Wetherspoons and was surprised to find that the name of the pub is The Sir Daniel Arms with photos and information on the wall of the restaurant and a short history that mentions Bedlington as his birthplace (see attached photos). Swindon also has the Sir Daniel Gooch Theatre and a Sir Daniel Gooch Road.

This made me realize how little has been made in Bedlington of the fact that he was born here. We all know the plaque on the wall of The Grapes, placed there, according to one of Evan Martin's books by The Bedlington Society in 1936.

The other famous individual from Bedlington is Michael Longridge and he is remembered by Longridge House on the Front Street. There is Longridge Way, Stephenson Way and Gooch Avenue at Barrington industrial estate but Bedlington should at least have a main street named after Daniel Gooch.

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Agreed James.

Very interesting that Swindon claim him.

I think the whole railway age owes a lot to Bedlington.

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Agreed James.

Very interesting that Swindon claim him.

I think the whole railway age owes a lot to Bedlington.

 

You're right Maggie, and arguably that's something of an understatement. It could be saiid that Birkenshaw's famous malleable rail - the 'bedlington rail - ranks as one of the most important innovations in industry in the early 19th century. Its use advanced the devlopment of railways to a degree that is difficult to put to scale these days. Much more efficient to manufacture, considerably longer than cast iron rails and far more reliable, the rail encouraged an expansion in railway installations in the UK and then beyond. Think of it, in relative terms, as something akin to broadband over dial up internet.

 

Incidentally, while I believe the town should and could do much more to capitalise on the rich heritage, Wetherspoons should be commended for the way the Red Lion is decorated with many fascinating pictures and panels on such luminaries as Gooch, Birkenshaw and Stephenson, even Dr Trotter, as well as exhibits on the iron works, the pits, the famous Penny Black and of course the dog. One notable painting is tucked away by the kitchen door and is a quite lovely illustration of the Iron Works as they were - well worth a look.

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What about John Trewick the footballer ... played for a number of clubs, West Brom, the Toon, and others in the late 1970s and 80s.  I have a vague recollection that he might have been the son of a Bedders publican (maybe Red Lion).

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Brian o' Neils brother John was electrician for bedlington council.John trewick went to bedlington grammar school he used to come in

To see the p.e staff with his west brom gear on I think he had a sister called Ann,I think they hailed from the stakeford guide post area I maybe wrong..

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Sir Daniel Gooch the most famous Bedlingtonian has recently been commemorated with a blue plaque at Windsor Station (opposite the entrance to Windsor Castle) in recognition for leading the project that lay the first successful telegraph cable between the UK and USA. At the opening speech it was said -

"He was the pioneer in bringing us the truly connected world we live in today".

A bit more recognition in Bedlington would be welcome

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Sir Daniel Gooch the most famous Bedlingtonian has recently been commemorated with a blue plaque at Windsor Station (opposite the entrance to Windsor Castle) in recognition for leading the project that lay the first successful telegraph cable between the UK and USA. At the opening speech it was said -

"He was the pioneer in bringing us the truly connected world we live in today".

A bit more recognition in Bedlington would be welcome

 

Interesting, and very worthy. An unsung hero of the times.

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On 16/08/2015 at 19:22, seamus49 said:

Was'nt Brian O'Neill who played for Burnley in late 50's early 60's a son of a Top End sweet shop owner?

or am I on the wrong tracks?.

Not quite the wrong track. The footballer was Jimmy Adamson from Ashington and played for Burnley, later managed Sunderland for a while.

His uncle had Adamson's shop opposite the Wharton pub and Fullatons  shop at the top end.

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On 04/08/2015 at 12:55, James said:

The most famous person born in Bedlington has to be Daniel Gooch. He was Isambard Kingdom Brunel's chief engineer.

 

 

Not quite Chief Engineer, Brunel would not have put up with that! Initially he looked after the engines that Brunel had already ordered to his own specifications. Brunel was many things but one thing he was not was a mechanical engineer.  His locos were rubbish and that is putting mildly, just like his Great Eastern engines. But just why he decided to knock out his own loco's spec instead of ordering ready made ones from Bobby Stephenson’s outfit at Forth Street is a mystery (Gooch learned his trade there as a draffie long before he met Brunel) and loco building by this time was a well known technology. 

Anyway poor ol’ Dan stood no chance and the GWR directors were non to chuffed with this state of affairs. He came very close to getting his P45. So what did he do? He did what any other Bedlingtonion would do in the same circumstances, he shopped the gaffa! Brunel was not too chuffed about it but it got Brunel off Dans back.

Only one loco was worth talking about and that was the North Star (and even that did not conform to Brunel's specification but they had picked up on the cheap from Forth Street) it was a standard loco for the time and built by non other than Robert Stephenson & co. So what does Dan do? He uses his draffie skills, draws it up and emails the drawings to the family concern in Bedlington and calls the new engines Fireflys.

Dan then is recorded as visiting Bedlington supposedly for a night or two on the beer with his old mate George Marshall, I don't believe it. I think he was up collecting his back handers from Longridge, and the rest, as they, say is history!

In fact pulling Brunel out of the clarts became a bit of a habit. The South Devon for instance when Brunel got himself in a bit of a pickle with atmospheric propulsion it was good ‘ol Dan who got him out of bother, again, at a price of course. Dan wouldn’t charge a penny where a pound would do or two pound fifty in the case of Brunel.

His selling of coal from his own pits to himself and charging the GWR for shifting it was classic.

Ah, don’t you just love history?

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Just a bit of an after thought, just imagine what Dan Gooch could have achieved with a Westridge education.......................

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Great Bedlington comment bluebarby.

Down to Earth but with humour.

Reality check.

It seems Daniel did go to school in the building along from Tesco's .

Perhaps only in his early years.

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Fabulous reading, this, keep it up!

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19 hours ago, bluebarby said:

Just a bit of an after thought, just imagine what Dan Gooch could have achieved with a Westridge education.......................

There's quite a few who would have benefitted from  a Westridge education!

Loving your posts!! Are you from the top end of Plessey Street, Bluebarby? You can message me an answer if you don't want to post here. I'm pretty sure we know each other.

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On 20/01/2016 at 21:04, Maggie/915 said:

It seems Daniel did

go to school in the building along from Tesco's .

 

From the information I have read it was 'next to the cross'. But it wouldn't surprise me if Jimmy Milne had something to do with it.

Shame they did not have class photos then but with my luck the day they were taken the school would have had a note from his mam saying she was keeping off 'cos he had measles!

 

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On 16/08/2015 at 19:22, seamus49 said:

Was'nt Brian O'Neill who played for Burnley in late 50's early 60's a son of a Top End sweet shop owner?

or am I on the wrong tracks?.

Brian o' Neill,[or "Bon"...to his friends],went to the catholic shool at Bedlington top-end,along with a few of my Friends,and also with my Wife.[when she was young!]

His Parents lived opposite my Mother in Law down at Grange Park from the Park being built.

When he made the grade,he came up north to see his folks,and brought oot aal thi nybors,ti see he's brand new Jag saloon!

THIS was an occasion!,seeing as the average car in the street,of which there were only a half dozen,were Ford Populars,[circa 1958-ish....],a Hillman Minx,a Ford

Anglia 105E.......!..etc.

He played in the school team alang wi me aad long lost Marra,["welsh-connect" on this forum],and my marra used ti be aalwis on aboot hoo gud Bon was!

Are yi in theor Welshie?!!

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On 17/08/2015 at 19:48, Symptoms said:

What about John Trewick the footballer ... played for a number of clubs, West Brom, the Toon, and others in the late 1970s and 80s.  I have a vague recollection that he might have been the son of a Bedders publican (maybe Red Lion).

John was brought up in East Terrace,Stakeford,or,as it was called in thi aad days..."Thi Bomar"...[Bomarsund colliery village...colliery owned terraces].

I lived in West Terrace from 1970-2001,.....31 years,and I nivvor,ivvor.....knew owt aboot fitba',but aa cud see hoo clivvor this nine year aad kid was when he went

up ti the store,for he's Mother's messages,,[shopping!],cos he used ti heed thi baal aal thi way up thi street,from one high waal ti thi other,side ti side,as weel as playing keepy-up withoot dropping thi baal at aal!

He's Dad worked at thi pit,as did he's uncle Jimmy,who was a Deputy at Ashington pit till it closed in 1987.[he was in charge of me and me marra's at times...........] 

John's Parents were the loveliest folk on this planet,as was John,he'sel' a smashing natured kid.

Nivvor seen him for years,what's he daeing noo?....Managing or Coaching?........

Oh,and can anybody tell me wat the original shop-owner's nyem waas,afore it became "Fullarton's"?[in the 1950's?]

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Noo!.........Wat aboot Mr Joseph Riley,an old friend and pit-marra of mine,of very long-standing,who was recently in the news when he received his Medal

from the French Government.

He still goes over to Normandy every year to take part in the D-Day Landings Memorial services...at 92 yrs old.!

We owe our Independance as a free country to Joe and all his comrades across all the forces!

No plaques yet,but a bet in time there will be![and rightly so!]

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Mods, what's happening with the Edit facility?......Cheers!

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