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John Fox (foxy)

One For Threegee

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Is this where you did your shopping Threegee?

Sort of. But when I lived in the Market Place, and ran errands for mum, all the cars were shiny black, and hadn't grown fins. There was also The Market Cross Stores off the left of this photo. Think that's where I got the bread; Barnes' was generally for a quarter of a pound of cooked ham! :D

Good one though!

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Sort of. But when I lived in the Market Place, and ran errands for mum, all the cars were shiny black, and hadn't grown fins. There was also The Market Cross Stores off the left of this photo. Think that's where I got the bread; Barnes' was generally for a quarter of a pound of cooked ham! :D

Good one though!

Musta been weel off 3G eating ham ? :whistle:

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Musta been weel off 3G eating ham ? :whistle:

Yes, indeed! Those were the days! Mind you I had to stand in the queue behind the miner's wives for our four ounces.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/july/20/newsid_3728000/3728225.stm

Everyone's cooked ham started to come to an end about 1964. Never quite figured that one out! :unsure:

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Some where at the back of Barnes shop, where you could get to the allotments was a brick building inside was were they boiled the hams. I remember going there with me grandad he would sit for hours talking to the old guy who looked after the hams.

Anyone else remember this and can maybe add somemore to jog me memory

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Some where at the back of Barnes shop, where you could get to the allotments was a brick building inside was were they boiled the hams. I remember going there with me grandad he would sit for hours talking to the old guy who looked after the hams.

Anyone else remember this and can maybe add somemore to jog me memory

I cant remember allotments behind the shops in the market place, and I lived just along from the right of the photo. Millnes field was at the back. there was allotments behind Barnes behind Blyth store [ the co-op where Ian Bells is now]. Barnes was at the back of Rothesay Terrace along with the library garage which was next door. As far as I can remember, it was Barnes' storage/distribution area but folk still whent there to buy their fruit and veg rather than trail up to the Market place. That is where you are maybe thinking of Alan, Ted Beat kept quite a number of pigs there, between the back of Rothesay Terrace and the pit heap. Incidently, the library garage was a brick building could that be the place before it was a garage.

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I am thinking of the front street, just down from the council offices. The fruit and veg shop, just to the side is a cut you walked down to the allotments on the way down was a small brick building inside there was an open fire with a big pot on the boil with hams inside.

Me grandad Charlton had an allotment down there we would spend hours during the school holidays.

Ted Hay he had pigs down at Hartford, when we lived in the Camps I can remember goin to see them and looking through that big window at the chicks hatching under the heat lamps.

HAPPY DAYS AH :rolleyes::rolleyes:

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