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I`m not sure if this is what you`re looking for but there`s various photo`s of Acorn Bank Opencast here. Just click on the photo`s to enlarge them :)

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Also, from 1955 - ``22 ton capacity Euclid trucks negotiating "Euclid-Bridge" over the Hartford Road near Bedlington, to reach the Ewart Hill Tip`` (taken from here)

acornbank1955.jpg

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I`m not sure if this is what you`re looking for but there`s various photo`s of Acorn Bank Opencast here. Just click on the photo`s to enlarge them :)

Thanks for that I may have seen them before on the Durham Miners Website There very Good anyhow!!!

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There's a video of Acorn Bank open cast somewhere here. Let me see if I can find it.

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Looks like the submitter removed the video from Youtube but the original topic with more info is available here

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Thanks for that I may have seen them before on the Durham Miners Website There very Good anyhow!!!

The Sixtownships has just released a dvd called `Digging up the past` which visits the Acorn Bank opencast in Bedlington 1959 if that`s any good to you :)

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The group has converted the cinefilm to DVD of the Acorn Bank. Its about maybe 5 minutes or a little more.

Its actually on one of our DVDs "Digging Up The Past"

Cracking footage and when you see them working in 1959 to todays opencast standards its unreal.

visit

http://www.sixtmedia.org.uk. and go to online shop if you want to purchase it.

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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Acorn Bank site was one of our favourite playgrounds when we were kids!

Sunday afternoon's,we used to play in the Euclids,when they were parked up on the top of the cut.

No security men in those days,weren't heard of..didn't need them.

We played in the driving seats,not locked,didn't damage anything,went down the cut and played on the feet of "Bucyrus Erie",which,at that time,in around 1954,[i was ten years old!]was the biggest walking dragline excavator in Europe.

At nights,after school at the old Whitley Memorial,we used to go over and lie at the edge of the cut,and look down a 200 foot drop,to watch Bucyrus chewing out the strata like toffee!

It looked magnificent,all floodlit up the jib,and around the cab.

It was an amazing sight to watch this huge beast,teeter forward on it's feet,the jib slowly bowing down slightly,then lifting it's whole weight,and slowly moving backwards,always backwards,about ten feet at a time.It's feet would then lift on a huge eccentric camshaft ,then they would move backwards and slowly thump down onto the ground,making the dust rise all around it.

What a sight

2,500 tons of steel walking as if it was on eggs!

Must rank as one of the finest amazing feats of engineering ever done in the world!

Yes,we watched the two Bailey bridges being built,over the Bedlington Bank road,and over the River Blyth.

We watched as Greenheart timber beams,more than two-feet -square,were sawn by hand,with two men at each end of a huge handsaw,must have been about six feet long.

These were to be used to build the trestle-work pillars to support the river bridge.

Greenheart is so dense ,it sinks in water!

I found this out,still as a kid,when we played down the river after the bridge was finished,and being used to transport coal to Bebside pit.

There were loads of bits of wood all lying around,on the river bed![i mean..BIG..bits!]

Loads of happy memories there,collecting fossils from the overburden heaps at the top of the picnic field......etc!

Getting rides in the Euclids,by canny drivers,who would let you push the lever to tip up the rear of the truck to empty it's load onto

a conveyor belt via a hopper....can you imagine it?.....this was before peoples brains were poisoned,and who,nowadays,would think that every canny bloke was a pervert out for young kids...these blokes just knew that THEY were kids a long time ago.......!

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Can you just imagine the uproar if the opencast was allowed to make aal that noise aal night lang in this day and age!!!!

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Even when my Brother and me were 10,and 13 yr old kids,we loved lying in bed,listening to the draglines chains clanking,the wailing eerie noises the dragline made when it was walking,the three blasts on the hooter as a pre-warning when blasting was about to take place,then the long single blast after you heard the loud explosion,followed by the house windows rattling!!

What with all that,and also the strong thud from the ground,usually about 9-0pm,every night almost!,

when the stonemen down the drift at the Doctor pit,fired their shots on the "caunch",on the coalface....now THAT was eerie!

Can anybody else remember all this?...surely the Millfielders wouldn't forget!!...they were closer than us at Hollymount.

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High Pit Wilma, I love reading your stories, and had the pleasure of reading them to my husband, then trying to work out where all the places you mention are. We think weve worked it out, thank you, I look forward to reading more. Eileen :thumbsup: .

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We lived in the Riggs in the 60s when they were digging adjacent to 20 acres (the hole is where the golf course is now) so the distance was only a few hundred yards.  Just like HPW I can remember the clanking, the hoots, the bangs, the ground shakes and the glass rattling.  But what an adventure playground it was for us lads ... I've post elsewhere on the Forum about the mischief we got up to on the site.

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I lived at my Grandmothers house in East Riggs in the late 50's and i remember all the sounds Symtoms recalls,but we just put up with things like that then and got on with it. Not like to-day

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You had it easy!

I remember 'getting up half an hour before we went to bed'

Oops sorry at Westlea we had it tough with the Euclids driving past the bedroom window.

Noise, dust and just the sheer size of them.

Try sleeping with that!

What an adventure playground!

Not to mention the Red House Farm.

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I was just telling my next door neighbour yesterday,[a retired woodwork teacher..],about how we,as ten year old kids,used to go down Bedlington bank,next to the river Blyth bridge,and watch all the floodlit action,as the joiner's sawed through twenty or thirty foot long Greenheart beams,to make the wooden trestles,with a long four-handled saw...and i mean about seven or eight foot long!!

There were two men at each side of the beam,each man holding his respective handle on the saw,and it took ages,probably more than an hour,or even two hours,to saw through one beam.

The beams were about two-feet square,and so dense,that the off-cuts just sank in the river ,they didn't float!!

There were no power saws capable of handling that capacity of timber,out by the riverside.

I can vividly remember the laying of the concrete foundations,on each river bank side,which,if i remember rightly,are still there.

Watching the beams being put together to form the huge trestles for the bridge,was fascinating,especially as all the activity we witnessed was under

powerful floodlighting,with big generators running,through the night to carry out the work 24 hours a day.[after school was when we would go down].

The first time we saw euclids going over the bridge,making the centre section bounce up and down like a yo-yo,was amazing,until we watched the 42 -ton coal-haulers go over.......it was frightening to watch at first,cos we thought for sure that the bridge would collapse under the load....it bounced so much!!

Now,with the benefit of the dvd which six townships has produced,there is evidence that,60 years on....there is proof that my old grey matter isn't

letting me down!!

There is a scene of a few seconds ,showing the coal-haulers going over the bridge,and yes.....the bridge DID bounce like a yo-yo.....a credit to the engineers who designed the Bailey bridge!!

It was a blast from the past to see the construction of a Bailey bridge in Rothbury,last year,while repairs were carried out to the old stone bridge,and it all came back to me..........1954....meccano type sections,clevis-pins,washers,split-pins,cross-beams,wood decking.....simple but very effective!!

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Some photos shared by John Brown - along with the comment he posted on the Facebook group Bygone Bedlington :-

 

The Acorn Bank opencast site at Bedlington around 1956. We called the dragline Big Bertha but it could have been anything really. It is amazing to think how many kids used to play around the site, climbing on the plant and getting rides in the Euclids which seemed to be as high as a house. Health & Safety what?

76771577_2465893513688829_7039068553349169152_n.jpg

75635946_2465894053688775_32870059026153472_n.jpg

John Brown.jpg

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