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Keith Scantlebury

The Gardeners Arms.

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Does anybody remember The Gardeners arms?.

I was looking back on some previous topics today and was reading with interest about Bedlingtons claims to fame and how Bedlington could best be promoted throghout the world to bring in visitors

Camille continued on the theme of the Bedlington terrier and how it may have been created because of a bet in the Gardeners Arms. I do not know if that is how the Bedlington actually came into being what it is today [ I know it was bred fom a Rothbury Terrier] but she is possibly not too far away with her facts.

As I have mentioned before, I used to live in the market place when I was a kid. On [very odd] occasions my dad used to take me with him to the Gardeners Arms on a Sunday morning. The landlord was a friend of my dads , he was a character called Ned Metcalfe. Ned was a prominent and well respected breeder of Bedlington terriers and he bred them in kennels behind the pub. [behind front st. east]. Ned and I shared a birthday and he used pull me a "special" pint [1/2 a very weak shandy]

On one such occasion, I could only be about 6 or 7 years old, the Gardeners was a bit busier than normal and a few of the "strangers" were very well dressed. Ned introduced us to a couple called Bill and Evie, Bill was a breeder of Bedlingtons and was here to take one or two away down south and maybe to America he said. This guy, Bill, I remember, was the perfect gentleman and seemed very popular [i remember being a bit peeved at not getting my normal attention from Ned], probably because he bought more than his fair share of rounds. Also I remember telling my dad that the bloke gave me the creeps, Bill heard me and broke into hoots of laughter.

I later found out that this couple were none other than Boris Karloff [real name William Pratt] and his wife Evie. I know he came back to the Gardeners a few times in the 60's before he apparrently became crippled with arthritis, then he used to send someone else.

On the point of promoting Bedlington, it would help if some people would actually admit to coming from here when asked where they come from. Where ever I have been in this country, or abroad , if someone asked where I came from I would proudly say BEDLINGTON then let them ask where bedlington is and then I would tell them that it is a small town in Northumberland. I saw Jayne Middlemas being interviewed on telly not long ago and she told the interviewer that she was from "near Newcastle". Yet Ross Noble told an audience on t.v. that he came from Cramlington. Could be that Ms Middlemass feels that Bedlington is not up there with the best places to come from , unlike Ross Nobles Cramlington or the Charlton brothers' Ashington.

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Andy Brown    11

I suppose a claim to fame would be, if William Gooch hadn't been born and bred in Bedlington, transatlantic communication may still have been in it's infancy, also the phrase paid on the nail may never have come to fruition as it is believed the monument in the Market Place is the place is where the saying originated from, maybe stamp collectors may want to know Bedlington was the first place the Penny Black stamp was posted/received (can't remember but if you look at the post box next to Fleming's dentists it will tell you)

Any other random history to tell ?

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Ask half the poulation of Bedlington and they wouldn't be able to tell you who William Gooch was Andy. Thats the first Iv'e heard of the origins of "Paid on the nail" , I must admit. All I'm saying is, if asked, people should say where they are from, not , near here or close to there. If you are from Bedlington, say so. If it bothers you that they don't know where it is, let them ask you. Just don't say near Newcastle and be done with it.

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Andy Millne    178

Ask half the poulation of Bedlington and they wouldn't be able to tell you who William Gooch was Andy.

William Gooch was Governor of Virginia. Not sure why half of Bedlington would be expected to know that ;)

Now Sir Daniel Gooch, that's another matter. :P

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Andy Brown    11

William Gooch was Governor of Virginia. Not sure why half of Bedlington would be expected to know that ;)

Now Sir Daniel Gooch, that's another matter. :P

Realised my mistake after I had posted and gone to bed, cheers for correcting it :)

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William Gooch was Governor of Virginia. Not sure why half of Bedlington would be expected to know that ;)

Now Sir Daniel Gooch, that's another matter. :P

ha-----HEM............ Just testing

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''Paid on the nail''………..for my tuppence worth…….

Probably more down to the many Bedlingtonians who made nails and were paid by product.

When Bedlington was the centre of nail production in the world of course, not that long ago!

As for The Nail, I did read there might have been a Saxon cross on the top of it, which would fit nicely with St Cuthbert etc. but trying to find out when it was put up is another thing!

Fascinated with the Boris Karloff story Keith any more to tell?

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threegee    638

As it happens I'm a onetime co-owner of The Gardners Arms, though didn't know that until I flicked through the deeds.

I've also so many connections to the town's canine mascot that I'm almost ashamed to reveal that the closest I've ever been to one is the focus length of the odd camera. :|

So... don't blame the kids that our education system has failed to give them even the remotest clue to their town's history and place in the world; the problem is generic!

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Threegee, when did the Gardeners close, do you know? Reason why is , I was delivering in Inverness earlier this year and believe it or not an old guy [he must have been well over 80] came up to me after seeing the address on the cab door, and asked where I from. He was from Bedlington and moved up there in 1960 the Gardners was the only place he would drink in and he looked absolutely devasted when I told him, among other things, that the Gardeners was long gone, but for the life of me I cannot remember when it actually shut.

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''Paid on the nail''………..for my tuppence worth…….

Probably more down to the many Bedlingtonians who made nails and were paid by product.

When Bedlington was the centre of nail production in the world of course, not that long ago!

As for The Nail, I did read there might have been a Saxon cross on the top of it, which would fit nicely with St Cuthbert etc. but trying to find out when it was put up is another thing!

Fascinated with the Boris Karloff story Keith any more to tell?

Afraid thats all I can remember about Boris Karloff, but the real character was Ned Metcalfe, he was a brilliant bloke, well I thought so anyway. He used to spend a lot of time in our garden, and his, with my dad. Threegee may know a little more about him though, whith being involved with the Gardeners Arms

Edited by keith

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mercuryg    234

....the phrase paid on the nail may never have come to fruition as it is believed the monument in the Market Place is the place is where the saying originated from....

Not quite Andy, but I can see why this might have become corrupted in time. A 'Nail', as in the momument you refer to, was common in market towns of the time and it is believed that 'pay on the nail' came about because these crosses/monuments were where the bartering took place. Quite why they became known as a nail is lost in time, but it is suggested that traders would nail their wares to them. There are few left, hence Bedlington's is a bit of a rarity in being so complete.

The Boris Karloff story is a brilliant one; never heard that before!

On the history note, I have a couple of letters from a Richard Young of the Ironworks posted to a solicitor in Alnwick in 1850; any ancestors of Young who can give me some further information on who he was?

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Threegee, when did the Gardeners close, do you know? Reason why is , I was delivering in Inverness earlier this year and believe it or not an old guy [he must have been well over 80] came up to me after seeing the address on the cab door, and asked where I from. He was from Bedlington and moved up there in 1960 the Gardners was the only place he would drink in and he looked absolutely devasted when I told him, among other things, that the Gardeners was long gone, but for the life of me I cannot remember when it actually shut.

as an exe beddie could you tell me where the gardeners arms was .i have competely forgot .?

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norman    14

Iremember the Gardeners Arms very well and old Ned, I had my first drink in that pub and remember Ned looking at me and telling me I looked exactly like my dad at that age.

While on the suject my late wife and I visited Western Australia 7 years ago and whilst there we visited Pricess Barracks in Albany, the guy who was running the cafe reconised my accent and asked where I was from, when aked this question I always answer inthe same way, Iam a Bedlington Terrier born and bred and very proud of it. The result ofg this conversation was that this guy to was originally from Belington and was a nephew of Ned Metcalf, small world.

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Iremember the Gardeners Arms very well and old Ned, I had my first drink in that pub and remember Ned looking at me and telling me I looked exactly like my dad at that age.

While on the suject my late wife and I visited Western Australia 7 years ago and whilst there we visited Pricess Barracks in Albany, the guy who was running the cafe reconised my accent and asked where I was from, when aked this question I always answer inthe same way, Iam a Bedlington Terrier born and bred and very proud of it. The result ofg this conversation was that this guy to was originally from Belington and was a nephew of Ned Metcalf, small world.

i am from bedlington i left 41 years ago . i am trying to find out what year it closed . could you tell me please ./

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i am from bedlington i left 41 years ago . i am trying to find out what year it closed . could you tell me please ./

It was converted into a veterinary surgery in 1968. Dont know exactly when pub closed though

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ross    1

Its interesting to hear these tales of Ned Metcalf. I know there's now a blue plaque on the wall of the old Gardener's Arms marking the spot. Does anyone remember Ned's daughter, Lily? Lily was my wife's great-grandmother. She married a Wilfred Ogglesby and had two children, Ted and Belle.

Any memories would be appreciated.

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Does anybody remember The Gardeners arms?.

I was looking back on some previous topics today and was reading with interest about Bedlingtons claims to fame and how Bedlington could best be promoted throghout the world to bring in visitors

Camille continued on the theme of the Bedlington terrier and how it may have been created because of a bet in the Gardeners Arms. I do not know if that is how the Bedlington actually came into being what it is today [ I know it was bred fom a Rothbury Terrier] but she is possibly not too far away with her facts.

As I have mentioned before, I used to live in the market place when I was a kid. On [very odd] occasions my dad used to take me with him to the Gardeners Arms on a Sunday morning. The landlord was a friend of my dads , he was a character called Ned Metcalfe. Ned was a prominent and well respected breeder of Bedlington terriers and he bred them in kennels behind the pub. [behind front st. east]. Ned and I shared a birthday and he used pull me a "special" pint [1/2 a very weak shandy]

On one such occasion, I could only be about 6 or 7 years old, the Gardeners was a bit busier than normal and a few of the "strangers" were very well dressed. Ned introduced us to a couple called Bill and Evie, Bill was a breeder of Bedlingtons and was here to take one or two away down south and maybe to America he said. This guy, Bill, I remember, was the perfect gentleman and seemed very popular [i remember being a bit peeved at not getting my normal attention from Ned], probably because he bought more than his fair share of rounds. Also I remember telling my dad that the bloke gave me the creeps, Bill heard me and broke into hoots of laughter.

I later found out that this couple were none other than Boris Karloff [real name William Pratt] and his wife Evie. I know he came back to the Gardeners a few times in the 60's before he apparrently became crippled with arthritis, then he used to send someone else.

On the point of promoting Bedlington, it would help if some people would actually admit to coming from here when asked where they come from. Where ever I have been in this country, or abroad , if someone asked where I came from I would proudly say BEDLINGTON then let them ask where bedlington is and then I would tell them that it is a small town in Northumberland. I saw Jayne Middlemas being interviewed on telly not long ago and she told the interviewer that she was from "near Newcastle". Yet Ross Noble told an audience on t.v. that he came from Cramlington. Could be that Ms Middlemass feels that Bedlington is not up there with the best places to come from , unlike Ross Nobles Cramlington or the Charlton brothers' Ashington.

yes it was the place to be if you were interested in bedlington terriers. will post some history on it soon.

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tomtom    26

In reply to Keith and his comments re people who don't or won't say they come from Bedlington (e.g) the Middleton girl. Well i have only been here for about 10 years now, I wasn't born and bred here, in fact I was born in North Shields which I am very proud of - I am however very happy living in Bedlington and I have never had any hesitation in telling people that I live in Bedlington and I am a well travelled person both in this country and abroad. The only thing that upsets me about Bedlington are the empty and run down buildings on Front street (i.e) the garage and the old school which are in a hell of a mess. What on earth is the point of Lottery Heritage money being spent updating other buildings when these eyesores are allowed to continue!

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i moved away from bedlington afew years ago when i go away on holiday i am often asked if i am a geordy to wich i reply i am a bedlington terrior and i always be one hence the name (bedeisathome .

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Brian Cross    78

If Bedlington and Northumberland is in your blood it is there to stay ......I am a proud Bedlington terrier as was my Mam and Dad.

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In reply to Keith and his comments re people who don't or won't say they come from Bedlington (e.g) the Middleton girl. Well i have only been here for about 10 years now, I wasn't born and bred here, in fact I was born in North Shields which I am very proud of - I am however very happy living in Bedlington and I have never had any hesitation in telling people that I live in Bedlington and I am a well travelled person both in this country and abroad. The only thing that upsets me about Bedlington are the empty and run down buildings on Front street (i.e) the garage and the old school which are in a hell of a mess. What on earth is the point of Lottery Heritage money being spent updating other buildings when these eyesores are allowed to continue!

When I first posted that, Eliots Garage was selling new Cortina's (only joking) It will be interesting to see what John comes up with.

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HIGH PIT WILMA    115

When we were kids,in the mid/early 1950's,we were terrified of "aad Gunter" Metcalfe!!

He always wore riding breeches and boots,and carried a whip doon thi street!

I have a photographic picture of him in my head,grousing at us kids for nothing at all...and in those days,we were learnt to respect older folks and not be cheeky,but I think it was just cos a few of us probably got in his way as he walked down the street...maybe he had a pint or two on board as weel!

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Eggy1948    203

@Lars Dahlberg - bit of info/gossip on the breeding of Bedlington Terriers, in Bedlington back in the 1950s. 

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HIGH PIT WILMA    115

Bedies,if you go down the street and stand at Bell's Place,which is the cut into Hollymount Square,opposite the Black Bull pub,then walk back up about 50 or 60 yards,you will notice how the street sort of goes in a bit,then juts back out,forming a little neuk.On the wall there is a blue plaque on the last building in the neuk,telling you that this is where the Gardener's Arms pub was....etc.[can you picture where I mean?]

We,as kids,were always led to believe that old Ned Metcalfe bred the first ever Bedlington Terrier,but I really don't know the validity of that story!

I always wondered why he ALWAYS! had riding breeches,riding boots,and ALWAYS carried a riding whip,whenever he walked down the street!,cos there were no horses in any of the local fields....only horned cows in the picnic field,in the days before the Miner's Picnic was ever held there!

He might have been a real canny fella,but to a ten year old we'en,he posed a very real threat!!....[walrus mustach,flat cap owa he's eyes,a permanent scowl..!!,aye...real scary!]

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