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Harty

Freemasonry In Bedlington.

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Lets not forget the masonic homes that will take care of a mason in need for life,and give them food room and board and medical too, and the homes work with local lodges to give the elderly as many activities as possible to keep them active, visit a masonic home and ask the residents if they are well treated!

That's excellent, and again I appreciate the charitable aspect. I'm simply looking for that little something that makes Freemasonry worthwhile (not that I could take part, of course, having no belief in a Supreme Being, although nobody would ever know......)

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My great uncle was a Freemason many years ago. His name was Daniel McClean. 

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I believe there may be a Bedlington Masonic Hall Museum and Library that historians would be interested in. Perhaps one of the brothers can confirm.

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I wouldn't hold your breath waiting for an answer Bedlingtonian.

I, for one, wouldn't fancy 'having my body severed in two, my bowels taken from thence and burned to ashes, the ashes scattered before the four winds of heaven, that no more remembrance might be had of so vile and wicked a wretch as I' just for passing on information! :D

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Actually webtekker they seem much more open these days.  I know some community groups who hire their hall and I've just got a community defibrillator out of them.  

 

I suppose it depends on who you 'talk' to of course. 

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There are guys in the the local bars who are Masons but never say what happens apart from they enjoy food and drink together. Why would these guys, who by the way are popular regular blokes become Freemasons just for social reasons when they are out more than a coal fire and have loads of mates ????? I'm intrigued to know a little more as it is something that I could possibly interested in joining if only I knew a bit more. I do like being part of a group and respect the charity work which is fantastic but I don't fancy rolling up in my best suit and realising it's not for me. 

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Yes. But how do you actually find out what goes on and if it's for you before your first attendance? I'm all for charities and being a better person but before choosing to join, a little more information from members would be great. 

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You can read a bit about it on-line at:

www.masonic-lodge-of-education

They mention that gaining membership can vary from place to place and in some countries you can aaproach a Lodge and request membership but in England "a man wishing to become a Free mason may be invited to join by a current member who feels that he would be an asset to the Fraternity." They say also that he "must be investigated as to his background and then balloted upon by his prospective Lodge's brethren." 

So. unless you're invited it doesn't look as if you'll find out much - other than on the Internet.

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don't believe all you read on the internet!!

John Hammill wrote a very balanced and open and OFFICIAL history of masonry (he was a Wallsend lad)

There is a lodge at Beamish museum which you can walk around, which was donated by the Masons.

I used to describe it as - not a secret society, but a society with secrets, and those only refer to the ritual. It was also perhaps the last bastion of the 'Christian ethic' on charity and help. they tend not to publicise the charitable works.

Scarborough Court at Cramlington is a masonic establishment and they used to have others and their own hospital and fund research into gerontology.

The requirement to believe in a god - a supreme being, is not specific to the Christian god, that is only required for the Knights Templar (clue in the name there)

Up until the 60's and 70's Armistice Day and several other public events were attended by masons in full regalia but this died off due to adverse publicity and the movement tended to be more inward than secretive. 

hope that helps

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Very interesting posts. 

However it would be a shame for such a long established group to potentially disappear from Bedlington due to declining numbers. But on the the other hand, when it's so hard to find out real information this will always be the case.

You just have to look at the number of churchgoers in Bedlington now. Society has changed and in my own opinion, not for the better. We are seeing a massive change as people are losing their social skills due to the new " Technology Era"  where using your thumbs on a keypad is the new way of communication and socialising.  

I may indeed ask more questions to the relevant persons and  may get involved with Freemasonry in Bedlington at some point in the future. 

Bedlington is in my blood and I love the town and all of its history and dream of seeing the mines re-open and the communities working and socialising together. A dream which unfortunately will never happen. 

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Apart from enacting the Ritual at every meeting, Freemasonry is simply a selective drinking club. Believe me. Been there, done that!

Supreme being? I only ever believed in Santa Claus but that was apparently enough!

It was most enlightening to enter the Lodge for the first time and see who your fellow Masons were. Nod, nod. Wink, wink!

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At last an open and honest reply. 

So, I'm taking that you have to be invited and let's be honest here, it would be favourable if you have something to offer within this private members group that could benefit fellow brothers. 

 

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I was invited by a family member. It matters not whether you have anything to offer the members other than your own good  character. Upon joining, a ballot is held and if it is deemed you are not worthy of admission then you will be 'black-balled.' (BTW, that has nothing to do with boot polish around your private parts, so don't worry!).

I found everyone to be approachable and had some fun nights there, but my main reason for joining was to find out what these 'secrets' were, and in that respect I was disappointed and discontinued my membership after a year or two.

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have a look at this link (its ok they wont come and get you and you don't have to get involved with anything hircine - its all lies about capra bovidae!!)

http://www.ugle.org.uk/

I think you can still visit and get a guided tour.

The interview panel is a board of installed masters and that raises a few eyebrows with candidates at times.

The 'blackballing' is a tradition also used elsewhere and it means that all members have to vote, but one black ball means the candidate is rejected (white balls signify acceptance)

What I found interesting is that, there were some very staunch members from all backgrounds, there were many miners in various lodges and some lodges seems to attract a lot of the same trades.

Do not get confused with the 33rd degree stuff and the Scottish rite also the American orders.

With the waning of popularity in the movement, some lodges meet, but only put through I set of candidates a year if at all, others seemed to feel pressured to recruit and 'streamed' through many.

 

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Details of members of the St Cuthbert's Freemason Lodge Bedlington can be found on Ancestry up-to around 1921. The birth date and date of initiation of the brothers can now be found online which is great for anyone researching family history.   

Edited by Bedlingtonian
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One of the first ever bookings my group had,in 1962-3 ish,was in the Market-place club,and was a Freemasons annual dinner-dance.

We had to go earlier in the afternoon to set our gear up,so we had a walk around the dinner tables ti see if we knew anybody!!

The Grandmaster was "Worshipful Brother" .......time - keeper/tally clerk at Bedlington A pit! [a reet canny fella!]

Another "Worshipful Brother was the raggiest,tattiest,rough unshaven,dislikeable bloke at Choppington High Pit,who lowered the coal wagons down the line under the screens to be filled....known as a shunter.[raised my eyebrows,and HIS, when we started to play....he was as dapper as a new teaspoon!,and HE couldn't beleive

it was ME entertaining Him!

We never got on at the pit before that,cos he wasn't the luvly Brotherly-love worshipping a supreme being sort of bloke at aal!!,he was a bit of a sod!!

But mind,AFTER THAT DAY,he was nice as nympince,like he didn't want me ti say owt ti anybody.......whey hoo cud a not? a had a gob like Tynemooth!

Mind,a was just a young whippersnapper,ave got a bit mair respect for an individuals needs and motives,and hobbies or interests etc.

There were a few other fellas who a was surprised ti see as well.

In aboot 1985-ish,a Deputy at Bates invited me to join,several times,but a was adamant not be involved,didn't hae time anyway,fully involved with my Wife and two young Kids.Nae regrets!

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