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Merlin

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I think you are unsprung too monsta!!! :jump:

just trying to get me point across! that there are no lynx in the uk! never said about anywhere else in europe!

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did you watch autumn watch last night? chris packham even said while he was talking about deer "there are no lynx in the uk" something to do with deer having no preditors in the uk! watch it on iplayer if you missed it!

i dont recall if it was autumn watch or unsprung!!! think i was unsprung the bit with the confused deers

Yes I did see it Monsta and you are correct he did say that deer have no preditors in this country, thas why they are killed in such high numbers because of the damage they cause. He also said its legal to kill them during the rutting season and it was Unspring

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Yes I did see it Monsta and you are correct he did say that deer have no preditors in this country, thas why they are killed in such high numbers because of the damage they cause. He also said its legal to kill them during the rutting season and it was Unspring

THANK YOU for confirming that pete!!! :whistle::lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

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Has Chris Packham, or whoever, walked every inch of the many thousands of remote and largely untouched moorland, woodland, forest and more that this country plays host to? Does he personally know every single animal that lives in the UK? or is he talking, perhaps, about NATURAL predators for deer, rather than non-native cats of the ilk that we are talking of here? It's great to point to evidence that lynx have officially been extinct for many years - they have - and that TV presenters know everything there is to know, but we're not talking about lynx, or other cats, in the sense that they live here naturally; we're talking animals that are here as alien species, possibly as released after the Dangerous Animals act came into force. There is, as I'm sure you know, a major difference.

As for having no predators, smaller deer are often killed by foxes.

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Has Chris Packham, or whoever, walked every inch of the many thousands of remote and largely untouched moorland, woodland, forest and more that this country plays host to? Does he personally know every single animal that lives in the UK? or is he talking, perhaps, about NATURAL predators for deer, rather than non-native cats of the ilk that we are talking of here? It's great to point to evidence that lynx have officially been extinct for many years - they have - and that TV presenters know everything there is to know, but we're not talking about lynx, or other cats, in the sense that they live here naturally; we're talking animals that are here as alien species, possibly as released after the Dangerous Animals act came into force. There is, as I'm sure you know, a major difference.

As for having no predators, smaller deer are often killed by foxes.

ask him yourself! http://www.chrispackham.co.uk/

i am sure he will have more experience in the matter than you!

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Has Chris Packham, or whoever, walked every inch of the many thousands of remote and largely untouched moorland, woodland, forest and more that this country plays host to? Does he personally know every single animal that lives in the UK? or is he talking, perhaps, about NATURAL predators for deer, rather than non-native cats of the ilk that we are talking of here? It's great to point to evidence that lynx have officially been extinct for many years - they have - and that TV presenters know everything there is to know, but we're not talking about lynx, or other cats, in the sense that they live here naturally; we're talking animals that are here as alien species, possibly as released after the Dangerous Animals act came into force. There is, as I'm sure you know, a major difference.

As for having no predators, smaller deer are often killed by foxes.

You makes some good points but as I have already stated on this thread the problem with these animals being released leaves a larger problem and that is breading. Most of these animals are human dependant surely.

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You makes some good points but as I have already stated on this thread the problem with these animals being released leaves a larger problem and that is breading. Most of these animals are human dependant surely.

It's a question that has been asked, debated and so on many times. One of the most common dismissals of the possibility of released or escaped lynx existing in the wild is that which you mention - the possibility, or unlikelihood as such, of them breeding. Yet, there is a well known example of a young lynx, one mentioned earlier in this thread somewhere, being sighted and positively identified with no known source - i.e it was not an escapee- forthcoming. Even those who are sceptical about 'Alien Big Cat' sightings freely admit that there is a strong possibility there are such animals loose in the country (I believe the expert witness account posted earlier - perhaps by yourself - alludes to this.) These animals, contrary to what Monsta might have us believe, are not reported once every few years, but quite regularly; mainly the reports come from people in remote areas, farmers and farmworkers, and a good many are from people on trains passing through generally uninhabited regions. More so than breeding, the real question is why so many reports are of 'black pumas' when the melanistic colouring doesn't exist even in the wild.

You may have gathered it's not a subject I've become interested in since reading this thread; I'm heavily into crypto-zoology and collect such reports.

Monsta - you completely missed my point: Packham was talking of a lack of native lynx, of which nobody - least of all me - is disputing. We are talking of animals that are not native to the country.

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I think you are unsprung too monsta!!! :jump:

You also might have a spring in your step when you recoil from some of his whitterings :dribble:

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Monsta - you completely missed my point: Packham was talking of a lack of native lynx, of which nobody - least of all me - is disputing. We are talking of animals that are not native to the country.

did you not say.....

It would be great if it was, but when was the last time a Scottish Wild Cat was seen in England? You're probably more likely to see a lynx!

there fore implying that there is a breeding population of lynx in england!

:rofl:

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Monsta, I'm going to put this to rest, I'm going to the golf course tomorrow morning with my vishus terrier on a big cat safari and I am going to get pictures (I hope) To prove to you that this Lynx exists, then maybe you will 'Shut up' sorry can't use emotion as it has disappeared, due to the whim of a newbie :angry:

Agreed :dribble: :dribble:

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did you not say.....

there fore implying that there is a breeding population of lynx in england!

:rofl:

I did say that, but where's the implication there are breeding populations of lynx in england in that sentence? I can't see it at all.Can anyone else? Furthermore, considering we - that's this thread - are talking not about native lynx, which mr Autumwatch rightly points out don't exist (just like native wildcats don't exist in England) surely you can see that the distinction is clear? You should do - it's been explained for you.

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Right Monsta I got absolutely drenched getting these for you, my vishus terrier hopes you appreciate it. Enjoy :dribble:

3.jpg

1.jpg

2-1.jpg

4.jpg

:dribble: :dribble: :dribble: :dribble:

  • Like 3

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Right Monsta I got absolutely drenched getting these for you, my vishus terrier hopes you appreciate it. Enjoy :dribble:

3.jpg

1.jpg

2-1.jpg

4.jpg

:dribble: :dribble: :dribble: :dribble:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

You'll have to give your vishus Terrier a 107002.jpg?ts=634229830780for the trouble!

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Right Monsta I got absolutely drenched getting these for you, my vishus terrier hopes you appreciate it. Enjoy :dribble:

3.jpg

1.jpg

2-1.jpg

4.jpg

:dribble: :dribble: :dribble: :dribble:

Merlin, does this mean that there are more than one lynx on the golf course or is it the same lynx posing in different locations.

  • Like 1

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Well done Merlin on clearing that up - and it's nice to know your work has been recognised:

post-694-049102000 1288728119_thumb.jpg

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Well done Merlin on clearing that up - and it's nice to know your work has been recognised:

post-694-049102000 1288728119_thumb.jpg

`One that captures perfectly the chaos and intensity of the autumn leaves as they surround the majestic lynx` :lol:

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Blank, they must know 'Genius' when they see it! But I must say they were bluddy quick :whistle:

Pete, you have no idea how hard it was to persuade this beastie to pose for photo's :blink:

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More photo's coming soon!

Sighted on a golf course in (guess where) Aust post-212-097369200 1288902337_thumb.jpg

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Its a Bush Python and i wouldn't go near it if they paid me

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