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Merlin

Big Cat

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Diana-27-web.jpg

My Diana 27 was made in 1967 for the Hy-Score company. It's a Hy-Score 807.

This the one Pete.

Yes Merlin but sadly I only had a Diana 24,used to buy a box of little pellets and go down the woods. I used to know what the mm of the pellets used to be but to old now cant remamber.

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I think Brian can attest to the destruction by feral cats! they are more of a problem than our wild cats, but they do keep the rabbit population down! we often get Lynx, cougar even bears on our golf coarse (and round town)

Feral cats are an ecological disaster in some parts of Aust. I remember the army was sent into an area that was infested with these animals and they shot 900 cats in an unbelievably small area possibly 2 sq miles, i am sure its not the animals fault but its humans dumping kittens in the bush where they go wild to survive.

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probably a wild cat

It would be great if it was, but when was the last time a Scottish Wild Cat was seen in England? You're probably more likely to see a lynx!

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It would be great if it was, but when was the last time a Scottish Wild Cat was seen in England? You're probably more likely to see a lynx!

probably if your in the black forest! so i still say it could have been a scottish wild cat. i remember seeing one up near white adder

the lynx extinct in england for 2500 years! :lol:

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the lynx extinct in england for 2500 years! :lol:

No bliddy wonder that stuff they sell in the super markets makes me cough when I spray it on mesell

Edited by Pete

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the lynx extinct in england for 2500 years! :lol:

In natural terms, that's true, but in fact there are known to be Lynx living in the wild in england. A number escaped from private collections in the 1950's or 1960's and they were never recovered. How long they lived for, whether they bred, and if so where they are now is an unknown.

A lynx is, also, somewhat bigger than a scottish wildcat which is the size of one and a half average domestic tabby's; had someone seen a wildcat i think they would have thought it a very big tabby, and not really thought much more about it.

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Reports in the press refer to big cat sightings in Northumberland as recent as March 2010. Most sightings are in the Hexham area. Closest reported sighting was Morpeth. Reports say there are more than 2 but no more than 12 big cats living wild in the Northumberland area!

The introduction of 'The Dangerous Animals Act' where people are required to obtain a licence, is to blame for the rise in sightings, as these people released their animals into the wild instead of applying for a licence or being refused a licence. A Lynx feeds on rabbits, hares and small birds, so they should be quite at home on the golf course as there are hundreds of rabbits and a good few hares, there are also a few 'Birdies' knocking about, I don't think they would be keen on the even fewer 'Eagles' that sometimes appear :whistle:

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As your probably aware I,m not the most prolific visitor to this site and to be TOTALY honest its the 1st time I have noticed this thread and as I did I breathed a sigh of relief because about 6 or 7 months ago I saw this BIGGER than a domestic cat on consecutive days and I thought it must be the light playing tricks with me glimmers.

I pass the golf club between 6.15 and 6.30 most mornings and I saw it near the old quarry on both occassions, it was the size of a fox but definatly catlike, I have not seen it since even though I do look, I even took my dogs down there in case it was laid up but to no avail.

So thank you for putting my mind to rest its nice to know I,m not going daft or seeing things :jump:

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aint posted on here before, but often read, and this interested me because although it was 3-4 years ago now i remember some mad people threatening to release Lynx/wolves/moose and other things back into the wild.

I have searched quickly and found there old blog thing the wild beasts trust

And facebook doodar on abour boar,bison,elk ana dll in northumberlands forrests - facebook group or page or whatever it is!

:mellow::blink:

Mick

Edited by tyreburner

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Sizsells, a lot of people see things and are afraid to say anything in case they are derided, accused of being barmy or simply stupid! Well let me tell you , the more I have looked into this subject, the more surprised I have been. The amount of sightings in Northumberland is quite astounding, from panthers, puma's and all other big cat varieties. Now I know that a fair percentage of these are made up,drink and substance related, but there are too many to discount as not being true.

What started off as a tale told to me by a mate has turned into, I think, a very interesting topic! Also a very worrying one. I am concerned at the lack-lustre response of the authorities, and the 'Naa, you are all mad to think they could survive in this country' attitude! What are they afraid of? :iiam:

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I am concerned at the lack-lustre response of the authorities, and the 'Naa, you are all mad to think they could survive in this country' attitude! What are they afraid of? :iiam:

The myth that big cats couldn't survive in this country was debunked a long time ago. There's plenty to eat and cats are, by their nature, elusive. As for the authorities, I think the best option is to leave well alone - a cat is unlikely to attack a human and I know of no certain reports of big cats attacking; most likely it will scarper long before you get close enough to it. The whole thing reminds me of the famous colony of wallabies that lived wild in the pennines in Derbyshire, close to where I was brought up. You could walk into the hills - not far from a small town - and watch them hopping around like they were native. I'm told the last one died recently as they were not breeding.

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The myth that big cats couldn't survive in this country was debunked a long time ago. There's plenty to eat and cats are, by their nature, elusive. As for the authorities, I think the best option is to leave well alone - a cat is unlikely to attack a human and I know of no certain reports of big cats attacking; most likely it will scarper long before you get close enough to it. The whole thing reminds me of the famous colony of wallabies that lived wild in the pennines in Derbyshire, close to where I was brought up. You could walk into the hills - not far from a small town - and watch them hopping around like they were native. I'm told the last one died recently as they were not breeding.

thing is as the expert on autumn watch pointed out, if big cats were in the uk were are the tell tale signs such as paw marks and recent kills to prove there actually there? bit like proving the big foot is real, there loads of sightings but no actual proof!

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Monsta, Finding evidence for a Lynx (If it is one) could be very difficult as they have a territory in excess of 30 square miles. I can't wait for the snow this year, to see if I can find some prints. Already been up the golf course early mornings already, armed to the teeth, with me cam-corder and camera and my ferocious Terrier :| Oh! And a bluddy good pair of trainers :lol:

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thing is as the expert on autumn watch pointed out, if big cats were in the uk were are the tell tale signs such as paw marks and recent kills to prove there actually there? bit like proving the big foot is real, there loads of sightings but no actual proof!

All very good points, but as merlin goes on to say Lynx, and other big cats, have a colossal territory and are naturally elusive creatures. Furthermore, cats aren't mythical like bigfoot - they exist. As I said earlier, there is no doubt that Lynx - and other cats - were released into the wild some years ago. Whether they continued to survive - and, crucially, breed - is another thing entirely.

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Stranger things have happened..........oh err misses!

first one looks like a blurry rock to me! with a somewhat human appearance!

why would beings from mars look anything like us humans?

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All very good points, but as merlin goes on to say Lynx, and other big cats, have a colossal territory and are naturally elusive creatures. Furthermore, cats aren't mythical like bigfoot - they exist. As I said earlier, there is no doubt that Lynx - and other cats - were released into the wild some years ago. Whether they continued to survive - and, crucially, breed - is another thing entirely.

still people in africa (a much larger conenant than little old england) can track big cats! so that theory dont work! so did that bloke on that wild life program that was on a few weeks ago, tigers up in the himalayas thats alot harser eviroment than bedlington golf club! :lol:

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