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Barton Lad

The Barrington Murder - 1948 ?

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Does anyone have any information with regards to a murder that was committed in Barrington approximately around 1948. I understand the husband murdered his wife and buried her body in the garden. They lived in Rose Cottage, which was located near Barrington School.

On a slightly different topic this book "The Alarming Accidents" , maybe of some interest.

www.newcastle.gov.uk/tbp.nsf/BookSearchCMS/06FF9BE339C3BC6A8025744A003E210E

The book provides stories of engraved glasses, which remembers mining, other accidents and also happier events in the North East England. For example a glass was engraved for "The man who broke the Bank at Blyth"

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I understand the murdered lady had a brother, surname Alison who lived at the top of office row. {Alison was involved in training the pit ponies}.

The brother reported his sister missing, when he had not seen her for a while. The husband of the missing lady used to sing just a rose in a garden of weeds, which was a popular song at that time. So that seems to confirm with the post above.

Someone living at Routledge buildings spotted someone digging in the garden and that how they found the body. I am not sure if anyone was ever convicted of this crime.

Is Rose Cottage that building, which stands back from the road and was at the end of Routledge Buildings.

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I understand that alledged murder was named Cracket, who actually moved out of the cottage before the body was found. It was only after the missing lady's brother reported her missing that the police started investigating. It must have been quite a shock to the new tennants to find a murdered body in thier garden.

There were two Cracket families living at Barringto at that time, but they were NOT related.

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Someone has kindly given me this photo of Barrington Pit. Not to sure of the year, but you can quite clearly see Stone Row and Bedlington Station Pit heap in the back ground.

Barrington Pit.pdf

Edited by Barton Rafie

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Thanks for the photo, which was taken from the other side.

Stone Row, which you can see in both photo's was knocked down in the 1950's. The houses were very basic. A "ladder" was used to climbed into the loft where the beds were. It is also interesting to note there were some sky lids on some of the roofs in Stone Row. It must have been quite dark on the houses without these sky lids.

Behind Stone Row was Barton Pit pond.

post-2446-003939100 1288712832_thumb.jpg

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as a young lad at the time of the alledged murder i was told that her husband used to sing (just a rose in a garden of weeds .

Thats were the song came from.

Look in Barrington Forum and ill post the complete story of Cracket

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The Barrington Murder. [Part One]

Lilian Crackett, was last seen alive by her doctor, Dr. Brown of Bedlington, on November 18th, 1949. For some time prior to that, her husband David Robert Sinclair Crackett, had told people that his wife was going to Torquay for health reasons. On November 18th, he told one person his wife was going that day by night train. The following day he told the same person that he had got her away.

During November, 1949, a sister of Lilian, sent her a parcel and received no acknowledgement. Then at Christmas the sister sent her a letter, but again received no reply from Mrs. Crackett. The sister then decided to write a letter to Mr. Crackett, asking him where her sister might be. David Crackett, replied to the letter, saying he apologised for not writing sooner as he had been brought home by ambulance just before Christmas and had just managed to get out again after being ill. He also told her that Lil, his wife, had left for Torquay in November. The letter continued, saying, We had discussed this matter for some time and then she made up her mind to go. Next day I had a phone call which made me think she had arrived safely, but it was from Newcastle. She asked me if I would go at once to the Grand Hotel, Haymarket, Newcastle. When I got there, Lil was standing outside the hotel beside a beautiful car with a man sitting at the wheel. She was wearing lovely clothes and looked very beautiful. She said, "I came to say goodbye Dave. I am off to South Africa. Here is the key to the small trunk. I am sorry I have had to use the cash.â€

The sister was not satisfied with the explanation and communicated with another sister who got in touch with a brother Mr. Robert Allison. On January 16th, Mr. Allison went to Garden House, Barrington, where the couple lived, and at the end of the house he found a patch of soil which had recently been disturbed. He probed the spot and he was satisfied, and indeed it was quite clear something had recently been buried there. He considered the matter further and on January, 18th, he notified the police, who visited the house and after digging uncovered a human left arm.

Later under the supervision of Dr. Stephenson, they uncovered the whole of a woman's body, that was almost immediately identified as that of Lilian Crackett. The body was about two feet, six inches below ground and wrapped in various articles of clothing and a groundsheet.

A post - mortem examination was performed and two wounds were found in the head which were consistent with having been caused by a heavy iron weapon. One wound across the back of the head was the cause of death, having caused two fractures to the skull.

After the discovery of the body the police traced Crackett to Torquay. They then sent two police officers down to interview him. The police told him of the body in the garden, and that it was believed to be the body of his wife. Crackett was then asked where his wife was and he replied, "She left me on the bus, on 29th November, at Bedlington Station to go to Torquay. This was on the advice of Dr. Brown, because she had been in ill health.â€

Crackett later said his wife telephoned him and requested he meet her at the Grand Hotel, Newcastle. "She was beside a big black lovely car, loaded with luggage. She said "I am going to South Africa, I am finished Dave. You will get the papers through from South Africa.†Crackett continued "A man I did not know drove the car away. I had seen the man with my wife in Newcastle before that.â€

Later, Crackett said he had made a mistake. When asked by the police what he meant, he said, "I killed her with a long bar for pulling out nails, because she threatened to kill me. She was sitting in the chair with a poker in one hand and a beater in the other. She was going to hit me, and I saw red and struck her.†Crackett was then brought back to Blyth and charged with the murder of his wife.

The police began inquiries into Crackett's business and movements and uncovered a great deal of information. They found, Garden House was rented to Mrs. Crackett at a yearly rental of £20.00. David Crackett, was employed as a process clerk at Reyrolles, Ashington. Between 14th and 21st of November, 1949, Crackett was absent from work and his excuse was he was going to see his wife off to Torquay. He returned to work on the 22nd November and remained there until December, 22nd, after which date he did not return to work.

The police also found out that Crackett had visited a money lender and on two occasions he borrowed the sum of £25.00 off them. The reason for borrowing the first sum was to purchase new poultry houses, which was never done. The amounts were repayable at £3.00 and £2.10 shillings, a month, and by October, three payments were in arrears, and it was not until December, 29th, that the loan was finally settled. They also found that before and after the murder of Mrs. Crackett, he was negotiating to sub let part of the house.

The case finally came to court and evidence was given by various witnesses. Detective Inspector, James Edward Jobson, of Blyth, stated that at 3.20 pm, he saw Crackett at Torquay and told him, "We are police officers and are making inquiries

Crackett, then replied, "I know nothing about anything in my garden.†The officer then told him he had reason to believe it was the body of his wife. He replied, "Good God, no. Not my wife.†The officer then asked when he last saw his wife, to which he said. "On the 11.19 am. bus on Saturday, 29th November, 1949, at Bedlington Station to go to Torquay. This was on the advice of Dr. Brown. She had been in ill health and I told Dr. Brown the following Monday my wife had gone. My wife telephoned me at lunch time the same day and at her request I went to the Grand Hotel, Newcastle. She was standing outside in a lovely black coat. She said she was going to South Africa and got into a big black car, with suit cases strapped on the back. She said "I am finished Dave. You will get the papers through from South Africa. Let Nan know.†I don't know the man who drove the car away. That is the last I saw or heard of my wife. I have seen the man in Newcastle before with my wife.†The policeman said, "If your wife is in South Africa, then whose body is buried in your garden ?.†Crackett replied, "I don't know.†The officer then told him that he did not believe his story. Crackett's demeanor then changed and he sat with his head in his hands on the table.

about a body buried in your garden at Garden House and intend to question you.â€

After a pause he said. "I have made a mistake. I killed her. I killed her with a long bar for pulling out nails because she threatened to kill me. She was sitting in the oak chair when I hit her over the head. She had the poker in one hand and the beater in the other. She was going to hit me and I saw red and hit her. I dug a hole and put her in. I wrapped my groundsheet around her.†After being cautioned and charged, Crackett said. "I wish to tell you the blow I struck was not intended to kill her, but to knock the beater out of her hand.â€

Another witness was called, Elizabeth E. Todd, of Routledge Buildings, Barrington. She said that both, Mr. and Mrs. Crackett, often came into her shop but she had not seen Mrs. Crackett since November 14th, 1949. Mr. Crackett had said to her that his wife was going away to Torquay for three to six months, and on November 19th, he told her that his wife had left by train. The next time she saw Mr. Crackett was towards Christmas, when she asked him about Christmas dinner. He replied that he would have four days holiday and may go to Torquay to see his wife. Mrs. Todd, said that Crackett had called in several times after that, and once told her that he was burning a lot of rubbish and cleaning the house out. He also showed her a gold cigarette case and said that his wife had sent it for him.

Another witness, George Thomas Waddell, of Sun Inn Yard, Bedlington, said that on November 19th, Crackett called at the shop and said he had called for the rations as there was no one at home to "book†the order or pay the money. Crackett also told him that he had just put his wife on the train to Torquay.

John Watson Tonkin, former manager at Messrs Reyrolles, Ashington, gave evidence as to one conversation in which Crackett had told him his wife had left him and gone to South Africa with a doctor, and that he knew the doctor as there had been trouble over the association before. Crackett had never told him the name of the doctor.

Put Part Two Up Later

Please note that the photographs i put up i have permission to use. You can download them for personal use, but not for anything else before getting permission and the story is copyright too.

I have to keep myself right regards copyright of this material.

Please keep to this agreement and we can be contacted at [email protected]

picture is of David Robert Sinclair Crackett

post-1337-0-04114900-1325874767_thumb.jp

Edited by johndawsonjune1955

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Richard Hastings Bolton, of Plessey Crescent, Whitley Bay, managing director of Confidential Credit Ltd, Newcastle, gave evidence to the fact that Crackett had borrowed two sums of £25. Each, and had offered a life insurance policy for £150. as a security. The first sum was to be repaid at £3. per month, and the second at £2. 10 shillings. Payments fell into arrears and he sent letters to Crackett asking for settlement. On his instructions a letter was also sent to Mrs. Crackett. On 22nd November, he received a letter from Crackett enclosing the sum of £10. On 13th December he received a letter from Crackett asking how much they would take in full settlement. He replied asking for £52. Crackett called at the office and paid him £50. Which was accepted as full payment.

Miss Ethel Bush, of Institute Row, West Sleekburn gave evidence to say that Crackett knew she was going to be married and towards the end of November, 1949, he asked her if she wanted to rent a house. On November 28th, she went to the house with her fiancé, Mr. Amos, and looked over the part of the house that was going to be rented. She agreed to take it at 10 shillings a week. Whilst there Mrs. Crackett was never mentioned, but she saw a photograph and Crackett said it was his wife, and she was a very dear woman.

Miss Bush, went on to say that she arranged to buy some furniture from him for £71. Her mother bought some linen and a china tea set. Crackett said to her that some of the furniture was going to the sale rooms. Miss Bush said how with her mother she looked into Crackett's part of the house and saw that the front room and bottom of the stairs had been stripped of wallpaper. They arranged to paper for him and this would serve as the first instalment of the rent. Continuing Miss Bush, declared that once while in the house alone with Crackett the wireless was on and a hymn was being played.

Crackett switched it off and said that was his wife's favourite hymn. Just after Christmas, Crackett said he was going to Torquay for a rest, and during this whole period she visited the house, she never saw Mrs. Crackett.

James Milne Amos, of Gordon Terrace, Stakeford, gave similar evidence to that of Miss Bush, and added that Crackett gave him the telephone number and address of the hotel he was stopping at. On 17th January, 1950, he rang Crackett because two of Mrs. Crackett's brothers had been to the house. Crackett said he was coming back in a fortnights time, but would write.

A Morpeth poultry dealer, George Parsons, of Newgate Street, said on 21st November 1949, he received a telephone message from Mr. Crackett, who said he had some poultry for sale. Crackett called the following day and said he had sixty head of poultry for sale. He advised Crackett that it was a bad time to sell, but Crackett said he wanted to sell them. Crackett had said that his wife had a nervous breakdown and had to be sent to friends in Torquay. Crackett said it was an emergency and he had been told that he was the only person who could handle that quantity. Crackett received the sum of £20.11 shillings in cash for them.

Finley Finlayson Murray, of Postern Crescent, Morpeth, gave evidence. He said in November 1949, he was employed by Mr. Parsons, and visited Crackett's house to collect some poultry. He killed 58 hens and two ducks. The ducks were at the bottom of the garden and Crackett said he was going to make a duck pond. He did not notice any fresh digging in the garden as it was getting dark. Crackett mentioned that he had made a trench for stopping thieves getting at the poultry. Crackett also told him that his wife was away to Torquay owing to ill health.

John Patterson, of Red Row Farm, Bedlington Station, said on December 4th, 1949, he went to Garden House, Barrington, and saw Crackett, who showed him some furniture which was for sale.

This included furniture, linen, and china. He paid Crackett £32. 16s. 6d for it. Since that date he bought more furniture off him for £15, and a bookcase for £20. Crackett mentioned that he did not want any publicity about the sale, but did not say why.

Robert Gray, of Darnley Road, Ashington, managing director of Messrs Gray and Rigby, Auctioneers, said that 30th November, 1949, he received a telephone message from Mr. Crackett who said he had some furniture for sale. He arranged to meet Crackett at North Seaton Station, and went with him to Garden House, Barrington. He prepared a list of articles for sale and Crackett told him his wife was an invalid and away down south to get well. He arranged for the collection of the goods and later sold them realising £67. 18s. 3d. Crackett bought from him two items of furniture for £15. He paid Crackett the sum of £44. 12s 5d, after deducting commission and haulage expenses.

Cairns Main, of Henry Nelson Street, South Shields, manager to Messrs Samuel, Jewellers, Newcastle, said that on 29th December, 1949, a man who gave his name as Crackett, called at the shop. Crackett said he had some articles of jewellery which belonged to his wife for disposal. He asked Crackett to leave them with him for an hour for examination, which he agreed to. Crackett called back again and was paid the sum of £4. 0s. 6d, for the items, and then purchased a wrist watch.

Next to give witness was, George Stanley Todd, of Routledge Buildings, Barrington, manager of an off licence premises. He said he knew both Mr. and Mrs. Crackett. On one occasion Crackett was talking about his poultry and said he could not look after them properly because of his work. He advised Crackett to sell them in a market.

On the left we have a photograph of David Sinclair Crackett, the photograph was taken at an amateur dramatics night in which he attended. It was said during the trial that he took a leading part in social affairs, and his wife did not like him devoting so much time to them.

This pic is his wife and victim Lillian Evelyn Crackett. This photo was taken while on a Women's Institute outing during the summer of 1948. Crackett said "she was a very dear woman.â€

Part Three To come.

Copyright also applies as part one.

post-1337-0-53472600-1325875124_thumb.jp

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This is the final part of this murder story.

Medical evidence was given by Dr. George Edward Stephenson, pathologist for Northumberland and Durham. He said he saw the body at Garden House, Barrington. It was wrapped in a number of articles of clothing; a raincoat covered the upper part of the body and face, and a groundsheet cape covered the lower part. The feet were tied and there were bindings in the region of the mouth and the centre of the body.

He said, how he later performed a post mortem on the body and formed the conclusion that death had occurred about two months previously. There were two wounds on the head, which were consistent with having been caused by an iron case opener. There was one wound on the hind part of the left temple muscle and another wound on the top of the head at the back in a central position. It was a gaping wound two inches long extending down the bone of the skull.

Crackett was then himself called into the witness box to tell his story. He said that they were married thirty four years ago and had been happy together. His wife's health was not too good, and he had to nurse her for a long time. After telling the court of his social connections, Crackett began to relate the incidents that led up to his wife's death.

On Saturday, 19th November, 1949, after giving his wife her breakfast in bed, which was the usual thing on a Saturday morning, as it was his day off, he went to the garden to feed the poultry.

Returning to the house at 10.55, he found his wife sitting in the chair, dressed in pyjamas and a dressing coat, reading a newspaper. He told her he would like to go to a rehearsal of the Stakeford Drama Society the following Thursday. She was annoyed and threw a poker at him, hitting him on the chest. He felt sick and left the room to go for a drink. Returning, he noticed that she had a steel beater in her hand. "She was moving it up and down and I expected I was going to get it in the face. I picked up the case opener, intending to knock the beater out of her hand. I got behind my wife to do so.â€

"Unfortunately, at the moment I got behind her she turned her head, moving her position. Instead of hitting the beater I struck her head. She slumped forward and I said "Just a moment darling ill get something,†and rushed into the pantry to get some brandy. When I came back she had fallen and was lying in the fireplace with her head in the corner.

Crackett described how she died in his arms, then he flopped onto the floor and lay there for some time. It was dusk when he came to himself. Many of the chickens were in the kitchen waiting to be fed. They often went inside the house.

"I could not realise where I was or anything. I did not know what to do. I knew that if I notified the doctor or the police they would not believe me. I just did not know what to do. I laid my wife on the floor and covered her with blankets and various other things, foolishly thinking I would keep her warm,†he said. Crackett said that he went down the garden and buried her. At no time had he intended to kill her, as he loved her so much.

Answering Mr. Hylton Foster, K.C. prosecutor, Crackett said that he panicked and did not know what he was doing when he wrote a letter telling the dead woman's sister that she had gone to South Africa. Crackett said that his wife had no money of her own and that he did not benefit financially by her death.

Dr. Charlesworth, for the defence, asked Crackett, "Did you intend to kill her ?,†in which Crackett replied, "Kill her ? I nursed her for thirty years. I had no intention of harming her. I loved her.â€

Addressing the jury, Mr. Hylton Foster said that it was part of the prosecutions case to tell them what the motive was, but it might be that Mrs. Crackett, a sick woman and quick tempered, was not falling into line with her husbands brighter social activities and was becoming a burden and someone he thought should be rid of. He submitted that the case was one of premeditated murder, and said : "Crackett, you are a fertile liar and this packet is all lies.†He further accused Crackett of being a hypocrite.

Dr. Charlesworth said that all the evidence proved that Crackett was anything else but a hypocrite. He was a man of exemplary character and all the evidence went to show that they were devoted to each other. He said that the story given by Crackett fitted in well with the evidence and pathologist.

Crackett was thought well of by everybody he came in contact with; and why should a man at the age of fifty nine years, suddenly change his character and murder his wife ?.

The pic is of the couple sometime after they wed.

Please note copyright applies as stated in part one and two.

Only for personal use if downloaded.

post-1337-0-20407900-1325875564_thumb.jp

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Heres pics from the murder at Barrington when the police were digging the garden up looking for the victim.

If you download the pics they are for your personal use only and permission given by us if you want them for anything else.

This is first pic.

post-1337-0-41170800-1325875820_thumb.jp

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Heres pics from the murder at Barrington when the police were digging the garden up looking for the victim.

If you download the pics they are for your personal use only and permission given by us if you want them for anything else.

This is pic 2 and final pic.

Hope you all enjoy the story.

post-1337-0-92255300-1325875914_thumb.jp

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I understand that alledged murder was named Cracket, who actually moved out of the cottage before the body was found. It was only after the missing lady's brother reported her missing that the police started investigating. It must have been quite a shock to the new tennants to find a murdered body in thier garden.

There were two Cracket families living at Barringto at that time, but they were NOT related.

Put the story up for you. its in 3 parts.

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