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Merlin

The Geordie Cook Book

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These recipes are taken from The Geordie Cook Book. I'll not blind you with science but every now and again I'll add a recipe. I'll start you off with a classic! ENJOY.

SHEEP'S HEAD PIE

ingredients:

1 Sheep's head and trotters 1/2lb puff pastry

6oz. cooked bacon pepper, salt and a little powdered mace

2 eggs hard boiled

method:

Scrape, and clean well, the head and trotters. Simmer for two hours slowly. While still warm, remove the bone and cut the meat into small pieces.

Slice the hard boiled eggs and cut up bacon. Place alternately a layer of meat in the bottom of a pie dish, sprinkled with pepper, salt and mace, and a layer of bacon and eggs and repeat this until dish is filled. A cupful of the stock the head was cooked in can be added before covering with puff pastry.

Bake for thirty minutes.

Serve cold with green salad

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BLACK PUDDING

Ingredients:

1 quart pigs blood, 1 quart milk

3/4 lb. bread crumbs, 1 cup cooked barley

1/2 lb. suet, 1 cup dry oatmeal

salt and pepper to taste, 1 oz.powdered mint

Method:

Mix all the ingredients together in a bowl, pour into a large pan and bring to the boil. Pour into a wide shallow bowl and season again if necessary. When cold it may be cut into slices and fried.

Edited by Merlin

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These recipes are taken from The Geordie Cook Book. I'll not blind you with science but every now and again I'll add a recipe. I'll start you off with a classic! ENJOY.

SHEEP'S HEAD PIE

ingredients:

1 Sheep's head and trotters 1/2lb puff pastry

6oz. cooked bacon pepper, salt and a little powdered mace

2 eggs hard boiled

method:

Scrape, and clean well, the head and trotters. Simmer for two hours slowly. While still warm, remove the bone and cut the meat into small pieces.

Slice the hard boiled eggs and cut up bacon. Place alternately a layer of meat in the bottom of a pie dish, sprinkled with pepper, salt and mace, and a layer of bacon and eggs and repeat this until dish is filled. A cupful of the stock the head was cooked in can be added before covering with puff pastry.

Bake for thirty minutes.

Serve cold with green salad

Merlin,

You are going to need tweesers to get any meat off a sheep foot?

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heres a couple i found:

Northumberland Caserole Ingredients:

3 quarters of a pound (325 gm) lambs liver

2 large onions, sliced

half ounce (12 gm) seasoned flour

6 rashers bacon

1 ounce (25 gm) fat for frying

half pint (300 ml) stock

1 and a half pound (780 gm) potatoes peeled, boiled and sliced Method.. Wash the liver under running water and then blanch by pouring over salted boiling water. Drain and dip into the seasoned flour coating carefully on each side. Fry quickly in hot fat. Remove from the pan and then quickly the potatoes and onions in the same dripping. Lay layers of liver, onions and potatoes in a 3-pint casserole dish. Chop the bacon rashers roughly and sprinkle over the top. Pour on stock, cover and cook at gas mark 5, 375 F (190 C) for 30 minutes.

_____________________________________________________________

SINGING HINNIES The singing hinnie was so called as, when the butter and the cream melted during the baking,

it sizzled on the hot girdle and was thought to be singing. An old tale is told of how this large

tea-time scone first became known as a singing hinnie.. a north country housewife was baking this scone for tea and on repeatedly being asked by her children if it was ready to eat, her final reply was "No, it's just singing, hinnies". (Hinnies a Geordie term of endearment for children and loved ones) Ingredients: half pound. plain flour

2 ounces butter

2 ounces lard -

1 ounce currants

half teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking powder

milk and sour cream

Method Rub fat into flour, add other dry ingredients, mix to a soft dough with a little milk and sour cream. Roll out and bake both sides on a hot girdle.

In order to turn these without breaking into pieces, use something wide

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Do you do a leek puddin Merlin?

My Mother`s were fantastic God rest her. Trouble is they were so filling you could barely stand up after eating one!

The best ones of course are cooked in a cloot!

:dj:

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Do you do a leek puddin Merlin?

My Mother`s were fantastic God rest her. Trouble is they were so filling you could barely stand up after eating one!

The best ones of course are cooked in a cloot!

:dj:

oh for one of my mothers home made stotties during the 1940s and 1950s

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oh for one of my mothers home made stotties during the 1940s and 1950s

Oh Yea

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These recipes are taken from The Geordie Cook Book. I'll not blind you with science but every now and again I'll add a recipe. I'll start you off with a classic! ENJOY.

SHEEP'S HEAD PIE

ingredients:

1 Sheep's head and trotters 1/2lb puff pastry

6oz. cooked bacon pepper, salt and a little powdered mace

2 eggs hard boiled

method:

Scrape, and clean well, the head and trotters. Simmer for two hours slowly. While still warm, remove the bone and cut the meat into small pieces.

Slice the hard boiled eggs and cut up bacon. Place alternately a layer of meat in the bottom of a pie dish, sprinkled with pepper, salt and mace, and a layer of bacon and eggs and repeat this until dish is filled. A cupful of the stock the head was cooked in can be added before covering with puff pastry.

Bake for thirty minutes.

Serve cold with green salad

Just wondering if your geordie cookbook has the recipe for Horseburgers in there? Reason I"m asking is I was in Wetherspoons on Monday night when two Yanks on holiday asked for them, when the barmaid said "we don"t eat horse in this country" The reply was, well the guy at the next table has just had some Mare Soup.

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My mother used to do a football size 'leek' pudding but the leeks were in the suet case and the middle had mince and onions. Cooked in a cloot but it took all day………..took us the full weekend to polish it off and even then the neighbour used to get some!

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My mother used to do a football size 'leek' pudding but the leeks were in the suet case and the middle had mince and onions. Cooked in a cloot but it took all day………..took us the full weekend to polish it off and even then the neighbour used to get some!

I find the best way to make them is in a slow cooker. Just cook them in a pudding basin, pyrex dish, or mixing bowl standing in water and let it steam all day. I make mine in the morning before i go to work and let it cook while I am out. Great to come home to after a long shift.

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My mother used to do a football size 'leek' pudding but the leeks were in the suet case and the middle had mince and onions. Cooked in a cloot but it took all day………..took us the full weekend to polish it off and even then the neighbour used to get some!

As did mine Malcolm. She used to do one on a Thursday. When I was doing my apprenticeship in Ashington I used to pedal like hell to get back home after the afternoon milking, Ashington to Bedlington on a pushbike in record time.

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23 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Would you like some pease pudding posted out or will you be making that as well?🙂

Well stocked up om split peas since my last visit to Blighty but thanks anyway!

...and, this may sound strange, but my all-time favpourite stottie filling is Fried pork sausage - split in half lengthways - and orange marmalade! It was also one of my father's favourites to take down the pit in his 'bait'.

Edited by Canny lass
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6 hours ago, Canny lass said:

Well stocked up om split peas since my last visit to Blighty but thanks anyway!

...and, this may sound strange, but my all-time favpourite stottie filling is Fried pork sausage - split in half lengthways - and orange marmalade! It was also one of my father's favourites to take down the pit in his 'bait'.

Mine = thick lurpack butter + corned beef + pease pudding + chips👌

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15 hours ago, Alan Edgar (Eggy1948) said:

Mine = thick lurpack butter + corned beef + pease pudding + chips👌

Chips inside the stottie or as a side dish?

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