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Merlin

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We have my cousin and his wife over here for a holiday, they are from Bedlington and she is a cracking good Geordie cook. i think i have put on 10kilo's since she has been here ............. :P :P

Jealous :lol: :lol: I need some recipes, good old fashioned Geordie ones ask her for some PLEASE!!!!!!! :D :D

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Jealous :lol: :lol: I need some recipes, good old fashioned Geordie ones ask her for some PLEASE!!!!!!! :D :D

what recipes would you like and i will ask her............

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what recipes would you like and i will ask her............

Leek pudding for starters, it was steamed or boiled in a muslin bag I think and how to make that thick stodgy pie crust to cover the bunnies I was on about. I love my food and cook a lot so anything else she has involving any kind of meat, pies, stews etc and not forgetting a good old broth! I have made broth numerous times but just can't get the taste of my grannies broth it's always missing something but I don't know what!

Thanks and I'm still jealous :lol:

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Leek pudding for starters, it was steamed or boiled in a muslin bag I think and how to make that thick stodgy pie crust to cover the bunnies I was on about. I love my food and cook a lot so anything else she has involving any kind of meat, pies, stews etc and not forgetting a good old broth! I have made broth numerous times but just can't get the taste of my grannies broth it's always missing something but I don't know what!

Thanks and I'm still jealous :lol:

Meat pies, rabbit pie, broth and leek pudding, you are making me feel hungry, what we need is a Bedlington book of recipe's Merlin, can we start with peas pudding?

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Leek Pudding

How to make leek pudding:

A typically English meal, probably dating from the 18th century. This dish was cooked in the time-honored way, boiled in a pot that no doubt contained the rest of the meal cooking in the same water. This would have included some sort of meat and other vegetables boiled in a string bag.

Ingredients

2 cups self raising flour

1/2 cup suet

a pinch of salt

organic leeks

cold water to mix

(see measure conversions for more information)

Method

- Put the dry ingredients into a bowl and mix together.

- Add some of the water and make into a fairly stiff dough.

- Take only the white parts of the leeks, clean them and cut into 1/2 inch lengths.

- Roll out the pastry into a large oblong shape.

- Put the leeks onto one half of the pastry and season with pepper and salt.

- Bring the other half of the pastry over the top of the leeks.

- Pinch all the edges together to seal the leeks in and then roll the whole lot up in a damp, floured cloth.

- Put into a pan of boiling water and boil for about 3 hours.

:D

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Meat pies, rabbit pie, broth and leek pudding, you are making me feel hungry, what we need is a Bedlington book of recipe's Merlin, can we start with peas pudding?

If I get enough Bedlingtonian recipes I'll certainly have a go Pete, Monsta came up with a cracking good leek pudding one though he probably found it on the net, saying that not everyone has access to such modern day functions and some can't be bothered to use it! So you Pete and all you others out there get asking your grannies or your better halves for some good recipes for some good old fashioned wholesome food and forward them to me on here. I think I just put on a stone thinking of the good times ahead :lol: :lol: Cheers

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Warlord comic and commando books. Camping oot on the football field and some kind of minty black liquorice sweets in a white box which I can't for the life of me remember the name of,. bout the same size of a tab box. Finding cards in the tea packets.

imps i think they were called. !*[email protected]# hot if you threw in a handfull.. lol

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Sorry m8 not imps I know what those are :D

The box was as said the size of a tab box liquorice in flavour. The sweets inside were individually wrapped in foil, again the same as the foil in a tab box. Whereas tabs are downward these were across the box and had a groove in them like chocolate.

Don't know where I'm going with this but I got to know what the mother*****s were called :lol: :lol:

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Sorry m8 not imps I know what those are :D

The box was as said the size of a tab box liquorice in flavour. The sweets inside were individually wrapped in foil, again the same as the foil in a tab box. Whereas tabs are downward these were across the box and had a groove in them like chocolate.

Don't know where I'm going with this but I got to know what the mother*****s were called :lol: :lol:

yeah,,like an itch you cant scratch !! you got my head wrecked now,,i am licorice mad, would eat it till my teeth gan black !! i was mad about spangles. and check out the picture//remember the chewwy backy for kids !!lol. had the taste of !*[email protected]# but we would all chew it and pretend we were miners..lolpost-2236-12736248149315_thumb.jpg

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Sorry m8 not imps I know what those are :D

The box was as said the size of a tab box liquorice in flavour. The sweets inside were individually wrapped in foil, again the same as the foil in a tab box. Whereas tabs are downward these were across the box and had a groove in them like chocolate.

Don't know where I'm going with this but I got to know what the mother*****s were called :lol: :lol:

christ man !! you got me up all night now..found this pic on the web,,i am guessing its not these because i am sure you would have remembered..lol ,,could you imagine the uproar if these were on display in the sweetshops this day and age ..? struth !!post-2236-12736298241414_thumb.jpg

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Sorry m8 not imps I know what those are :D

The box was as said the size of a tab box liquorice in flavour. The sweets inside were individually wrapped in foil, again the same as the foil in a tab box. Whereas tabs are downward these were across the box and had a groove in them like chocolate.

Don't know where I'm going with this but I got to know what the mother*****s were called :lol: :lol:

it couldnt be as simple as kendal mint cake could it..the brown one was a bit tangy if i remember..margrets shop at bebside sold them during the seventies.. they came in a slab..

perhaps if you just go down to the sweet shop and pig out it might help...i know thats what im doing when the shop opens...slavering now !!post-2236-12736334114938_thumb.jpgpost-2236-12736334398485_thumb.jpg

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Wonky I'll give you this lad 'ya a trier'lol. An chewy baccy jesus h christ I'd forgotten all about that. These liquorice things are doing my heed in! I GOTTA KNOW!

Ya Ni.g.ga boy ciggies would be absolute class now, can you imagine, can you actually imagine what would happen now LMFAO I tell you what I got, I got two Robertson Jam GOLLY W.O.G badges an wear them with pride :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

The rigmarole you gotta go thru to get words on here and here's me thinking we live in a FREE country with FREEDOM OF SPEECH :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Edited by Merlin

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Ginnie Wilkinsons fish and chips, catching raisbecks bus from the Terrier to Westridge School cost a penny.

Playing in the Free Wood and the Happney Woods, swimming in the Flaggy and at the quay, camping on the green behind Beaty Road. Building camps in the A pit timber yard and getting chased by the colliery police.

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Ginnie Wilkinsons fish and chips, catching raisbecks bus from the Terrier to Westridge School cost a penny.

Playing in the Free Wood and the Happney Woods, swimming in the Flaggy and at the quay, camping on the green behind Beaty Road. Building camps in the A pit timber yard and getting chased by the colliery police.

was that you norman ? lmao.lol lol.post-2236-12738502231587_thumb.jpg

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The old old raisbeck bus, white with green stripes, never seemed like it was going to make it up to the top end, anyone have a picture of that, springs popping out of the seats, freezing cold in winter..........those were the days

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cant remember one with green stripes, but there's a pic on here of the white one with either orange or red stripes?

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cant remember one with green stripes, but there's a pic on here of the white one with either orange or red stripes?

this one was still older and had a bonnet that stuck out in front of the windsheild, it was always falling apart, it had a big boot at the backend for luggage, he would sometimes rent a bus when this one was being fixed!

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can anyone remember when the raisbeck ran little chopper over? :lol:

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this one was still older and had a bonnet that stuck out in front of the windsheild, it was always falling apart, it had a big boot at the backend for luggage, he would sometimes rent a bus when this one was being fixed!

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I remember Raisbecks white bus with the green stripe, it was a Bedford and the bonnet did stick out in front, I was returning home from school must have been 1957/8 and just as we were comming down Beech Grove on of thr rear wheels came off,It happened just opposite a shop you may or may not remember, Deefie Thomsons who would sell you one woodbine and give you a match to light it.

All the best

Norman

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was that you norman ? lmao.lol lol.post-2236-12738502231587_thumb.jpg

does anyone know when Ginnie Wilkinsons chippy closed.

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