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Storey's Buildings Choppington

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Storey/s

Buildings stood from the

Unitarian chapel down to the bridge at

Choppington

Station

I lived in

No 6 until it was demolished in 1973.

My house was once a tailors. Street was built in 1875

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Story/s

Buildings built 1875 demolished 1973 stood from the

Unitrian

Chapel down to the bridge at

Choppington

Station

I lived in

No

6 which had been a tailors shop in its early days

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Watcheor Alan! Nice ti see yi joined the set!

A referred ti yi withoot saying ya name on page 3 of this topic,just ti confirm ti John,[at the time] where Storey's Buildings were,cos aa lived there when a was a kid,which ye aalriddy knaa,but ye might have forgotten aboot,seeing as it's a while since a seen ye.

Great video ye med, wi John and Davey from Bates Pit..aav watched it a few times!

Keep a hauld Marra!

Edited by HIGH PIT WILMA

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Hi all!

On the subject of Storey's Buildings,i'm afraid you are wrong,Mr Dawson....no disrepect intended!

The street ran down the bank,and ended at the Willow bridge,where the the old "Barn'ton burn" flows beneath..this street was on the right side of the road as you head for Ashington.

The street was demolished in the late 60's to create the new junction that takes you along Barrington road.

The top of Storeys buildings was dominated by the pub called "The Railway Tavern",which,in the early 60's,was run by my best mate's brother,Bob Walker.

A good old pit Marra of mine,who Mr Dawson will know,with the initals A.Dix.,lived in the street until the Council served a compulsory purchase order upon him,,to allow the demolishon.

Going down the street,there was a shop that sold sweets among other things,a Chapel witha walled rear garden,outside netties across a clarty back street.

There were no trees in the fields to the left originally,and you could see right up the burn,to the Black railway bridge.

The pit ponies used to be kept in the fields to the rear of the street,on the right side,going down the bank.

Now,

Alan,this is where aa med reference ti ye,wi ya initials,hope ye dinna mind owa much!

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Aye the fields across the road were a 9 hole golf course in Victorian times..

The trees there now were planted in 1973.

Johns cousin pulled an original golf course sign out the burn 2 or 3 years ago.

I think the houses on other side of bridge belonged to a Mr Foggo who had the brickyard behind his houses.

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Aye Alan,in 1947,a really bad winter,in horse and cart days,thi snaa on thon bridge was level with the waals on each side! 

Me and young Ronnie Andrews used ti play on a smaal tree stump,wat had a couple o' branch staaks sticking oot like handlebars,and mek on it was wor motor bike......a think that idea came from me uncle Tommy,who used ti cum ti wor hoose at no3 Storey's Buildings,on he's motorbike,and that would be thi ownly bike a  wud ever see...![ we were ownly three years aad ye knaa],and them fields were just plain fields,nae trees,reet up past thi black bridge,which isn't there noo.

Tha was a big pond up the fields,where thi Barn't'n burn used to widen oot,and when it froze in them days....it stayed frozed!!

Ivrybugga used ti gaa up and slide on the bugga.

Thi Barrington pit ponies used ti be in the back fields during the summer holidays,and one day aa climbed up on the barbed wire fence ti see them,and one came owa and bit me cheek,mekking me faal off the fence,and riving me shin doon the barbed wire.!

Wat a carry-on!...aav still got a canny scar on that shin yit as a reminder not ti climb on barbed wire fences ti see pit pownies!

A nivvor knew tha was a golf-course there mind,nice bit o' history.

A was doon thon bank a week or two ago wi me little dog,just poaching aroond where the aad chapel used ti be,and a see the remains of the chapel garden waal is still there,jutting inti thi field,but owagraan wi trees and wat-not.

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Er,Alan,aam presuming yi DAE knaa hoo aam is.......tha was ownly ONE Wilma ye ivvor knew at thi pit![ who played a mean twangy geugaa!]

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Jimmy had a massive brain haemorrage a few years ago,Al,and survived it.A saw him ootside Gleghorn's a while after,and spoke to him...[me gud aad guitarist marra]...

He looked at me,vacantly,and when a sed yi dae knaa me divvent yi?,Jimmy?....he said,whey aye,it's eh....eh....eh.....[thinking hard and looking mair

vacant,...eh....it's Billy,isn't it..?

A knew then,hoo bad he was,cos HE NEVER....EVER....caaled me Billy,in the years since we first met,in the High main seam,at the A pit in Bedlington,

aroond aboot 196.....the year Bomar pit closed....was it 1966, Alan....?

Titchie Wilson,[thi owaman,]..placed me and Jimmy on Supplies,cos tha was nea piece-work,and we hit it off immediately,both being Shadows fans,and playing their music.

It was sad to see me Marra like this,but we still had a gud crack,noo a divvent knaa if he is still here or not.

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