Jump to content
Hide Adverts
Andy Millne

Bedlington Old Hall

Recommended Posts

Received this email yesterday. It seems people interested in history are often stuck in the past as despite my cajolings for her to register and post it herself it didn't work ;) Ah well better it gets posted by me than not at all.

I read in Nicolas Pevsner's book about Northumberland Architecturethat there is a place called Bedlington Old Hall, which is in part anold tower, and is opposite a pub called the Kings Arms. I cycled to Bedlington today, and was really interested in all the blue local history trail panels, but couldn't see any of the above. Can you help?

Many thanks.

OLD HALL, a C16 tower house with hood-moulded mullioned windows, and immediately adjoining it a frontage of ten bays, as plain and matter offact aqs if it had been built as a mill. Nearly opposite the KING'S ARMS, five bays, two storeys; doorwary with segmental pediment onTuscan pilasters.

From The Buildings of England, Northumberland, by Nicolas Pevsner, first published 1957.

You are are probably right about The Grapes being the Kings Arms. If so, it is devastating to think that the Old Hall has been demolished. Probably some of your older members will know.

I also plan to go to the church again tomorrow, to look at the"uncommonly interesting" chancel arch, according to Pevsner. I couldn't get in yesterday, but will go during/after the service at 9.15.

I really enjoyed the few blue history trail markers I saw too, andwanted to find a leaflet with them all in. Is there such a thing?

I came away quite fascinated about Bedlington! At the moment, I am looking at pele towers, bastles and older church architecture in Northumberland, so that was why I went there. Just for fun, and I tie it in with walks and cycle rides.

Bridget

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience too. Not mentioning and names the simplest of things seems to be beyond some of our local historians. Maybe they should borrow someone's five-year-old kid to help? wink.gif

Anyway, and present company excepted of course Bridget... smile.gif back to The Old Hall. It was demolished by vandals (otherwise known as the local coonc'l). The site is now occupied by the outstanding piece of architecture called the Bedlington Council Offices. Constructed to the highest 1960's building standards, it was carefully and quickly distressed with cracks so as to blend into the local distressed environment/economy. I believe it is built in the the Socialist Empire (everything can be carefully planned, and committes know best) style.

This of course is the same bunch of idiots responsible for the erasure of much of our heritage. Also the very same "public servants" who go around slapping listing and protection orders on every piece of uninteresting tat just because it has somehow survived long enough i.e. without any regard to the town having a future either!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Theres a building down church lane called The Tower,don't know if this is of interest to you,but there again you probably already knew about it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was born in no 2 Old Hall in 1948. My father, a putter in the Dr pit, kept pigs at the bottom of the gardens ( fields really). Would bring pigs up to the Yard on Thurday night and kept in the old coal houses till saturday morning when Hay the Butcher would oversea the slaughter while mother was in the house with the wireless turned up full.. Couldnt go anywhere in the house without seeing a side of salted pork hanging up encased in white muslin.He later kept Rabbits, over 100 of them, again, for the table. Chicken was a luxury, way beyond our affordability. How times change, Brian T.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian,and welcome to the forum,which,if you browse aroond a bit,ye'll find sum interresant bits o' history,especially if ye happen ti cotton onti the Bower family topic,seeing as ,....your Brother Billy....[? hope aam reet heor!],used ti knock aroond wi young Jimmy Bower,and me being Jimmy's marra,also used ti hang aroond wi thi two of them.!!

Noo isn't it queer hoo time gaans by,and ye wud nivvor hev dreamt that sum day ye wud hook up wi folks from thi past through technology!!

Billy Turnbull was a reet canny lad,and a can picture his face as a 14 year aad yungun' even noo.

A hope welshconnect comes on and finds this topic....that's Jim!!

Can ye remember the tunnel at thi side o' the keep,Brian?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Theor it gaans again.....font-change withoot my permission!!.......technology!!!!!.....and a was just praising it afore!!.......aa divvent knaa....!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Brian, welcome to the forum mate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian Turnbull again. Just picked up a few snippets. Re Tunnel at the side of the"Keep".It had been filled with sand .we'd go in there and mess about. Nelly Scott,  Hanna's daughter who lived with Walter Daglass (also had a massive alsation called Prince) had seen me playing outside and took me into the tunnel and messed about. I heard my mother calling me in for my tea. Nelly told me to wash my hands at the tap in the yard and say nothing. My mother knew there was something strange going on but didn't find out. Anyway ,I bet nelly had a smile on her face for quite a few days afterwards, horny little bugger.

Regarding Vic Paterson , were you part of the Paterson the butcher who had a shop and slaughter House near the Coffin Chapel?.

Re Brian Cross, were you in my class in primary school and emigrated about 1958?. I think Matty Hall was our last teacher there He used to sing in the Bottom Club according to my dad. I barely remember you bragging about a Mortgage, and I said we had one too but couldn't remember what colour it was we obviously had no idea what we were talking about but we wouldn't be outdone.

 My brother Billy took his family to New Zealand to work around 1978 and I havn't heard from him since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Brian no not me we emigrated in late1951

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Foxy   I remember you from the 60/61/62 era. you were into motor bikes big time with young Arris Hayley( I say young because his father- a coal merchant was also called Arris). Billy joined the navy just before his apprenticeship with the NCB was due to end He, like me never had any intention of working underground.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brian,Matty Hall used ti sing on Parents open days at the Whitley,and I distinctinctly remember him singing one song called "Tommy Lad.....Tommy Lad"...etc,in a deep baritone voice.

He was also a champion boxer in his army days,so they reckoned.

He was also a "Stinger".......with thi 4 foot  lang blackboard ruler!

Arris hayley was a real canny youngin',he used ti come ti school wearing Swiss [?] leather traditional short pants,looked heavy and bulky,and seemed as if they would be really uncomfortable!....can you mind them Brian?

One day he came over ti thi park,[beside the Whitley],flashing a gun,not a toy gun!!...I think it was a small derringer type,maybe a .38 cal....he was thi envy of aal thi kids!!

Come ti think on't,where was Arris from,or,should I say his Parents....Arris isn't a typical British name is it?.....!!!!

So,Brian,did your Bill gaan ti thi Whitley as weel?,cos tha's summick puzzlin' me.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cant remember the name of the school Probably was the whitley .Turn left at the bottom end of Bedlington towards station. about 400 yards down on right side next to a sweet shop called Binks I think. Arris just lived 3 doors up from me in Meadowdale Cres.,He had an elder brother, can't remember his name. As far as I know,they were fully British no weird accents or anything. Before moving to the council estate they had a house and coal yard just down from the school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Canny lass said:

The boy's name Arris, while not one of the most common names, wasn't too rare at the beginning of the 20th century. There was one in my family born 1917.

canny lass, the name of my mate is.... Arras,... I'm still in touch with him, Arras Haley who you may remember from Westridge, I believe there is a town in France with the same name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, John Fox (foxy) said:

That was Quasimodo,:wacko:  my mates name is   Arras   as the town in France. pic taken from westridge class photo.

school photos001 copy.jpg

Quasimodo, haha! very funny!

Yes, I remember him now that I see his face (Arras, I mean).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...



  • Latest News

    • A big-hearted donation by one of South East Northumberland’s largest employers has enabled local football club, Bedlington Terriers FC, to provide its players, staff and visitors with rapid emergency response should it ever be needed.
      Lynemouth Power Station has gifted the community club with a life-saving heart defibrillator which will now be installed at the Welfare Park ground. If deployed within three to five minutes of a cardiac arrest, such equipment could potentially increase the chances of someone surviving a heart attack from six to 74 per cent. Each minute without CPR and defibrillation also reduces a patient’s survival rate by between seven and ten per cent.*
      The Northern League Division Two club is home to seven teams and over 80 footballers from senior players to an under 6 ‘tots’ team. Along with daily training sessions and match attendances, the club sees hundreds of people visiting the ground on a weekly basis therefore the defibrillator has been very well received by all.
      Rowan Edwards, Commercial Director of Bedlington Terriers FC, commented, “This is a vital piece of first aid equipment and we are extremely grateful to Lynemouth Power Station for their kind donation. Given the number of on-site staff, players training each week and visitors to the ground, it is essential that our trained staff have instant access to life-saving equipment in case of emergencies. It will mean a lot to everyone here at the club as well as the local community, so we’re very grateful for the power station’s support.”
      Janet Mole from Lynemouth Power Station added, “Having these devices installed in popular public places and venues is so important, so rather than just donate to the fundraising effort, we decided to purchase the equipment outright on behalf of the club. As a local employer, it is important that community initiatives like this are well supported so we’re delighted to hand over the defibrillator to all at the club.”

  • Latest Topics

×
×
  • Create New...