Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
alicat

Old Places In Bedlington

Recommended Posts

Hello

Im collecting infomation on my family history, they were born and lived in bedlington around 1840s.

Thomas Miller my G/grandfather born around 1855, his father was Thomas Miller also born in Bedlington he was a Tinsmith, his mother was Margaret Young born Alnwick her people were Hawkers and traveling people.

Im also looking for a Margory Fox who lived in a Lodging house in Bedlington daughter Agnes Fox and William J Fox, these were also Traveling people.

Has anyone got any info on were Walter terrace is, if it is still standing, and were the lodging was in bedlington in the 1800s or where would I find the old maps of Bedlington.

Thanks

ALI :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...Has anyone got any info on were Walter terrace is...

Are you absolutely sure that's Walter and not Water?

...where would I find the old maps of Bedlington...

In the county archive at Morpeth. amongst other places. We do have a quite good scan of a mid 1800's one somewhere. Will try to locate and republish it.

But Bedlingtonshire covers(ed) quite a large area and I don't believe that W?? Tce. would be at all near the main street (Front Street) - which is what that map centres on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you absolutely sure that's Walter and not Water?

In the county archive at Morpeth. amongst other places. We do have a quite good scan of a mid 1800's one somewhere. Will try to locate and republish it.

But Bedlingtonshire covers(ed) quite a large area and I don't believe that W?? Tce. would be at all near the main street (Front Street) - which is what that map centres on.

Not sure threegee Im taking the address from the 1861 census it says 146 could it be walker terrace?

ALI :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not sure threegee Im taking the address from the 1861 census it says 146 could it be walker terrace?

Can you pass me the link to the census data? What does the number 146 refer to?

Thinking about it I have a distant memory of a Water Tce. or Water Rd., or somesuch. But we're talking Sleekburn way here, and nowhere near Bedlington town, so it probs wouldn't appear on a Bedlington street map of any date.

Walter does not ring any bells - except maybe Walter Wilson's, the grocery chain who had a presence in Bedders for many many decades.

Update

=====

Hmm.. there's a Waterfield Road down by the site of the former powerstations - doh! - really SHOULD have remembered that! :mellow:

http://www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?cli...&multimap.y=406

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can you pass me the link to the census data? What does the number 146 refer to?

Thinking about it I have a distant memory of a Water Tce. or Water Rd., or somesuch. But we're talking Sleekburn way here, and nowhere near Bedlington town, so it probs wouldn't appear on a Bedlington street map of any date.

Walter does not ring any bells - except maybe Walter Wilson's, the grocery chain who had a presence in Bedders for many many decades.

Update

=====

Hmm.. there's a Waterfield Road down by the site of the former powerstations - doh! - really SHOULD have remembered that! :mellow:

http://www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?cli...&multimap.y=406

Sorry threegee cannot give link as it was the Ancestry site where I got the info from and they dont keep the data that you have looked at.

146 was the door number. and do you know were the lodging house was in Bedlington?

I know one of my aunts was born near the butcher shop in the high street somewhere in 1915.

I think it looks like Walker tce

ALI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Butchers shop isn't much help, there used to be lots up and down the Front (main) Street and elsewhere. The name of the butchers would help though. We couldn't be talking about Walkers *the* Butchers could we?

The numbers on both Front Street East and West (high steet) don't go quite that high. They run upwards going from both directions toward The Market Place (town center). Both sets of numbers end something either side of a hundred, but never as high as the 140's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Butchers shop isn't much help, there used to be lots up and down the Front (main) Street and elsewhere. The name of the butchers would help though. We couldn't be talking about Walkers *the* Butchers could we?

The numbers on both Front Street East and West (high steet) don't go quite that high. They run upwards going from both directions toward The Market Place (town center). Both sets of numbers end something either side of a hundred, but never as high as the 140's.

Perhaps one of your relatives is Tommy Miller who owned the general store almost opposite the black bull until the early 80s he lived on glebe road on the other side of the road from taits ice cream shop near to the bingo hall he also converted the shop next to his store to a prize bingo,cafe and disco in the late 70s from a dry cleaners shop (harton cleaners) tommy millers store was 2 doors away from a pork butchers called Gurneys in front st east, later to become a cafe the only other butcher was hays in the market place where the bus stop is

there was land behind tommys shop and like so many other yards in the day had houses in them

i cant for the life of me remember the name but there were 3 or 4 houses in a yard behind millers shop

mind you I am only going back to the early 50s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello

Im collecting infomation on my family history, they were born and lived in bedlington around 1840s.

Thomas Miller my G/grandfather born around 1855, his father was Thomas Miller also born in Bedlington he was a Tinsmith, his mother was Margaret Young born Alnwick her people were Hawkers and traveling people.

Im also looking for a Margory Fox who lived in a Lodging house in Bedlington daughter Agnes Fox and William J Fox, these were also Traveling people.

Has anyone got any info on were Walter terrace is, if it is still standing, and were the lodging was in bedlington in the 1800s or where would I find the old maps of Bedlington.

Thanks

ALI :rolleyes:

hi do you know the names of thomas millers family brothers & sisters etc if you would like i can look at the census discs for bedlington for you.ive also got miller in my family

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Walker Terrace was on the first left before going down Bedlington Bank.

I think it stood next to a street called Coach Road.

That old big sandstone house for retired clergymen ,is it Spring mount was at the end of the road.

The bottom end was always considered the hard up part of Bedlington

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alan,Walker terrace would be right,the guy must have had money,he had a big house on the bottom end front street,with a canny sized apple orchard roond thi back,which,for us kids,was conveniently high-walled,and running alang thi bottom of the gardens at Hollymoont Square!

We had a  field day quite often when the trees were laden wi apples.

The apples were cookers and soor as hell,but we would raid the orchard,more for excitement than owt else,fill wa jarsey's up ti thi hilt,run owa ti wa camp in Knoxy's field,climb a tree,[which was wor camp tree],and sit up theor,chowing apple gowks till wa eyes waata'd,but not spitting thi bugga oot!

Pains in the guts aalwis came later,but wi still did it!

Jimmy Smout bought the property and turned it into a betting shop when it became legal to run one.

Alan, Jimmy trained ye and me  at thi aad pit,in 1959,and he wasn't half a funny likeable guy,remember?....Ned wasn't quite the same character as Jimmy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Watcheor H.P.W I always remember Mr Smout giving us apiece of advice.He always referred to the pony in the 3d person.Right bonny lads divvent stand at the back cos it kicks like hell and divvent stand at the front cos it bites if it gets a chance.

P.s there was a time team style dig there about5yrs ago but don't/t know any results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"there was a time team style dig there about5yrs ago but don't/t know any results."

 

It was more than five years ago as I lived at Hollymount Terrace at the time. They uncovered foundations of unknown origin which one of the lads told me they believe to be 16th/17th century. Houses on top now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,can ye mind Jimmy Smout daeing his first-aid mock-ups?

At Bedlington A pit,[for other people-Alan!],there was a mocked-up coal-face,on the surface,where Jimmy Smout used to re-create an accident scene,being a fall of stone from the roof on the "face",and an injured miner lying under the roof fall,with serious injuries,bones sticking out of his leg,etc.

Jimmy was better than any professional film make-up person!!

He would disappear from the first-aid class for a quarter of an hour,then realistically come running into the room,urgently calling for help,his Marra was

trapped in a fall of stone...."howway lads,mek sharp,me marra's badly hurt,ye'll need a stretcher......"[he was a hell of an actor as well!!]

We would take the part,as we were training for,and rush in to rescue the "trapped" miner.

The first time we did this,aged 15 years,straight from a school desk,some of the young lads were almost sick,seeing leg bones sticking out from bleeding

tissues,black and blue bruising all over,swollen flesh......

Jimmy was a smashing fella,very well-liked by everybody.

Alan,did Jimmy also have a magic trick or two,or am I getting mixed up with another instructor at Seaton Burn training gallery?....

No!!!...it's come to me,it was Tommy Aldis [ginger haired bloke],at Seaton Burn pit.

Happy days eh?...little did we knaa wat we were letting wasell's in for!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your right about Mr Aldis !I remember him doing magic tricks in timberyard sat Seat on Burn.

George Rafferty also taught us first aid.

There was Mr Brennan at that time to ,wasn/t exactly the life and soul of the party

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Noo thaa..aat reminds me of thi time when  oor Frankie played for Manchester....?....."!!!!!!

That was his crack every week when it was his session with us.[Frankie Brennan was a great footballer in the fities.....so old Frankie-his Dad,used to tell us!]

Aa alwis liked him,Alan,but you are right,not many laughs and carry-on!

Howw,Alan,aad forgot aboot Geordie Raffery,mind ,HE was a gud crack!

He wud use stories [like me!],ti illustrate thi principles of first-aid,and how you had ti use your loaf and improvise in emergencies......

Like he told us how he attended a lady who had fallen,and had a compound fracture..[bones sticking oot her leg..].

Nae stretchers on the scene,nae splints,so he ripped a fence doon in sumbody's garden,tore his own shirt up ti mek bandages,[as you would...],and got the lady to hospital,and saved her life from loss of blood...[oh and he put a torniquet on...[canna dae that noo...so says the book!!]

Next thing he knew was a summons from the police for damaging the blokes fence!!...[did he mek these stories up or what?!!...it was supposedly a close-knit mining community!!]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  



  • Latest News

    • A big-hearted donation by one of South East Northumberland’s largest employers has enabled local football club, Bedlington Terriers FC, to provide its players, staff and visitors with rapid emergency response should it ever be needed.
      Lynemouth Power Station has gifted the community club with a life-saving heart defibrillator which will now be installed at the Welfare Park ground. If deployed within three to five minutes of a cardiac arrest, such equipment could potentially increase the chances of someone surviving a heart attack from six to 74 per cent. Each minute without CPR and defibrillation also reduces a patient’s survival rate by between seven and ten per cent.*
      The Northern League Division Two club is home to seven teams and over 80 footballers from senior players to an under 6 ‘tots’ team. Along with daily training sessions and match attendances, the club sees hundreds of people visiting the ground on a weekly basis therefore the defibrillator has been very well received by all.
      Rowan Edwards, Commercial Director of Bedlington Terriers FC, commented, “This is a vital piece of first aid equipment and we are extremely grateful to Lynemouth Power Station for their kind donation. Given the number of on-site staff, players training each week and visitors to the ground, it is essential that our trained staff have instant access to life-saving equipment in case of emergencies. It will mean a lot to everyone here at the club as well as the local community, so we’re very grateful for the power station’s support.”
      Janet Mole from Lynemouth Power Station added, “Having these devices installed in popular public places and venues is so important, so rather than just donate to the fundraising effort, we decided to purchase the equipment outright on behalf of the club. As a local employer, it is important that community initiatives like this are well supported so we’re delighted to hand over the defibrillator to all at the club.”

  • Latest Topics

×
×
  • Create New...