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jorga

Help With Cd Burning

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I can burn data and music to a CD but it will only play on a computer, how do you get it to play on an audio machine can anyone help please.

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this is how i do it, but i'm no expert:

this is based on vista, but should work on xp too.

open windows media player (WMP).

click on the 'burn' tab at the top of the display window to switch to the burn menu, then click it again to show the options.

choose 'audio cd', you may also wish to review the 'more options' link to see if all is set as you require.

drag and drop files into the right hand column in WMP

arrange the tracks as you would lick by dragging and dropping them into the order you want them to play.

insert a blank CD-R

click 'Burn Now'

in the more options section mentioned before, i have it set to eject after burn is complete, so with mine, as soon as the disk ejects, its done!

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On a more general level what you need to produce is known as a "red book" standard CD. This format goes back almost 30 years, and is now also known as IEC 908. That's the only format that is guaranteed to play on any audio CD player ever produced.

You can't include MP3's or any lossy modern format files on a red book CD unless they are trans-coded back to a raw bit-stream first.

Essentially red book CDs have a fixed 44100 samples per second of the sound waveform each stored as 16 bit values (64K distinct waveform levels) recorded for each stereo channel. So the constant fixed bit rate is 44100 x 16 x 2 = 1411200 bits per second, even for silent passages where there's no real data. This is horrendously inefficient by modern standards. All of which explains how you can fit countless hours of high quality MP3s etc. on a CD, but an absolute maximum of only 78 minutes of red book audio.

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On a more general level what you need to produce is known as a "red book" standard CD. This format goes back almost 30 years, and is now also known as IEC 908. That's the only format that is guaranteed to play on any audio CD player ever produced.

You can't include MP3's or any lossy modern format files on a red book CD unless they are trans-coded back to a raw bit-stream first.

Essentially red book CDs have a fixed 44100 samples per second of the sound waveform each stored as 16 bit values (64K distinct waveform levels) recorded for each stereo channel. So the constant fixed bit rate is 44100 x 16 x 2 = 1411200 bits per second, even for silent passages where there's no real data. This is horrendously inefficient by modern standards. All of which explains how you can fit countless hours of high quality MP3s etc. on a CD, but an absolute maximum of only 78 minutes of red book audio.

o....k,

so...how do you do this?

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so...how do you do this?

Seems like you already know! :) Non-specific questions get non-specific answers.

The question doesn't even say the burning is to be done with a computer let alone which computer, which operating system, and what additional software/hardware is to hand - it could be with heated curling tongs! :P

Was sitting next to a guy at dinner last night and a computer question came up. He said he'd had the machine back to the shop to correct this or that, and, making a square with his hands on the table, that it was a tiny machine. Oh, said I, an UMPC then? Blank stare. Runs Windows Tablet Edition then? Blank stare.

It was a very good buy, said he, only cost £212. Immediately my mind started churning through what tiny bit of obsolescent crap only cost £200 and what closed, highly-forgettable, OS it might run. What make is it? It's an ASUS, he said.

What usable ASUS UMPC can possibly have cost only £200, and what outdated version of Windys were we struggling with here, thought I. Inspiration then hit: It's not a Eee PC - is it?! Yes, he said, a tiny bit surprised. Then, it runs a version of Xandros Linux; luckily you've got a huge amount of PD software available to do your xyz task. You install it from a repository using the package manager off the command line! Very, very, confused stare. I poured another glass of wine.

Moral of the story: you can assume diddly squat until you are specifically told. Not even that you've got any sort of disk drive available. And, even when you do guess dead right, often you still can't provide more than generalisations!

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this is how i do it, but i'm no expert:

this is based on vista, but should work on xp too.

open windows media player (WMP).

click on the 'burn' tab at the top of the display window to switch to the burn menu, then click it again to show the options.

choose 'audio cd', you may also wish to review the 'more options' link to see if all is set as you require.

drag and drop files into the right hand column in WMP

arrange the tracks as you would lick by dragging and dropping them into the order you want them to play.

insert a blank CD-R

click 'Burn Now'

in the more options section mentioned before, i have it set to eject after burn is complete, so with mine, as soon as the disk ejects, its done!

What he said.

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Seems like you already know! :) Non-specific questions get non-specific answers.

The question doesn't even say the burning is to be done with a computer let alone which computer, which operating system, and what additional software/hardware is to hand - it could be with heated curling tongs! :P

Was sitting next to a guy at dinner last night and a computer question came up. He said he'd had the machine back to the shop to correct this or that, and, making a square with his hands on the table, that it was a tiny machine. Oh, said I, an UMPC then? Blank stare. Runs Windows Tablet Edition then? Blank stare.

It was a very good buy, said he, only cost £212. Immediately my mind started churning through what tiny bit of obsolescent crap only cost £200 and what closed, highly-forgettable, OS it might run. What make is it? It's an ASUS, he said.

What usable ASUS UMPC can possibly have cost only £200, and what outdated version of Windys were we struggling with here, thought I. Inspiration then hit: It's not a Eee PC - is it?! Yes, he said, a tiny bit surprised. Then, it runs a version of Xandros Linux; luckily you've got a huge amount of PD software available to do your xyz task. You install it from a repository using the package manager off the command line! Very, very, confused stare. I poured another glass of wine.

Moral of the story: you can assume diddly squat until you are specifically told. Not even that you've got any sort of disk drive available. And, even when you do guess dead right, often you still can't provide more than generalisations!

Could be modern day problem with the art of communication?

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Could be modern day problem with the art of communication?
I have Windows XP using BT broadband I have burned loads of CDs with Windows Media, Real Player etc. but none of them could be played on an audio machine.  I know about the Red book system, but it seems unless you are prepared to spend a lot of money on programmes such as Nero or others you can get no further than just playing the CD on your computer.  Has anyone done it without buying a programme?

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I have Windows XP using BT broadband I have burned loads of CDs with Windows Media, Real Player etc. but none of them could be played on an audio machine. I know about the Red book system, but it seems unless you are prepared to spend a lot of money on programmes such as Nero or others you can get no further than just playing the CD on your computer. Has anyone done it without buying a programme?

What version of Media Player are you using and what process do you go through to create your CD's?

Have you tried what Mr Darn suggested?

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i regularly burn cd's that play in normal cd players, not had one fail yet.

the trick is to make sure its set to burn a music cd, and NOT data, at all the relevant points.

in addition to blanks question, what cd player are you trying these disks on, and does it play normal 'paid for' disks ok?

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here if windows media player is not working you could download CDburnerXP its free and works like nero. find it here if you are converting WMA files you will have to down load an addon but the site explains that!

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here if windows media player is not working you could download CDburnerXP its free and works like nero. find it here if you are converting WMA files you will have to down load an addon but the site explains that!

Note that WMA files aren't a method of encoding/decoding like say MP3 is. It's a wrapper around several different codecs. Some lossy some not. One of the codecs is MP3, and much of the information on some of the others isn't available to other developers!

The point I'm making here is that WMA support from anyone other than M$ may not be complete or buggy. OK, OK, delete the "other than M$". :lol:

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I have Windows XP using BT broadband I have burned loads of CDs with Windows Media, Real Player etc. but none of them could be played on an audio machine.  I know about the Red book system, but it seems unless you are prepared to spend a lot of money on programmes such as Nero or others you can get no further than just playing the CD on your computer.  Has anyone done it without buying a programme?

Jorga try the following link it may be healpfull, there is a lot of information on this site.

http://club.cdfreaks.com/f48/dvd-data-disk...ot-read-132597/

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I have Windows XP using BT broadband I have burned loads of CDs with Windows Media, Real Player etc. but none of them could be played on an audio machine.  I know about the Red book system, but it seems unless you are prepared to spend a lot of money on programmes such as Nero or others you can get no further than just playing the CD on your computer.  Has anyone done it without buying a programme?

just found a site for you where you can download Nero which I happen to use myself & it's good & it only costs about a fiver. so here you go hope it's useful. http://2008-version.com/nero/ Latest version also.

Good Luck. & get yourself down the Dun Cow for a swift one after you've got sorted.

Pam

x

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:mellow:

has this problem been sorted yet?

what worked for you?

Its Good To Talk! :D:D:D

Gave up with this, can only use the CDs on my computer Thank you everyone who posted all the helpful hints, I did try them all but got nowhere.

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:mellow:

Gave up with this, can only use the CDs on my computer Thank you everyone who posted all the helpful hints, I did try them all but got nowhere.

i'm sorry to hear that jorga :(

should you fancy another crack at it, let me know and i'll do a step by step guide of the way i do it, see if its something simple were overlooking.

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