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Mr Darn

Loathe: The Bedlington Terrier!

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u a puff like :lol::lol:

NO I'M VERY FEMALE LIKE MONGO. :huh:

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ee sorry had a couple of reds to wind down after quite a busy night. I think the terriers are funny lookin. I remember when I was 16 & had a boyfriend in London, as you do like. I was staying with him, & his parents of course & I went to get into bed this night & the bloomin terrier had poo'd in the bed. Couldn't believe it. Poo's just a bit like a poodle if you know what I mean. Couldn't help but laughin when we found some under the pillow. Guess it didn't like me. Bit strange like that a dog can poo under the bedding never mind the bloomin pillow. Maybe the parents didn't like me eh. Ha ha

Not really.

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HI Bedlingtonians,

I live in Glastonbury Somerset and what makes Bedlington known is the Bedlington Terrier, have seen a few in my time in Glastonbury as most people who own them are suprised that you know the breed,as I come from Bedlington I tell the suprised owners,every owner I have met likes the breed,it always reminds me of Bedlington when I see one, maybe it's not the most handsome dog,but compare it with other breeds it's unique in it's characterstics as a dog from an ex mining town in the North-East of England.

Yours in the Spirit of Cooperation

Malcolm G Allan.

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er- noticed that bit earlier about owners looking like their dogs... I have a Bernese mountain dog and have had them for many years - a bigger dafter more affable dog you couldn't find, but over the last 30 yrs the life span has gone down from about 12 (my first was 11) to about 6 - last one died 2 weeks afore 6th b/day - cancer takes most of them. But have hopes for the present one as father was brought in from Scandinavia and mother is of a good line. its never easy getting a dog that you know doesn't last long but i'm well taken with the breed, but then I like big dogs.

HOWEVER, herself has met a few Bedlington terriers on her rounds and is most taken with them, and cant believe how soft the coat is - she keeps hinting that maybe when we cant cope with big dogs that is the way to go...

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2 hours ago, pilgrim said:

... I have a Bernese mountain dog and have had them for many years - a bigger dafter more affable dog you couldn't find, but over the last 30 yrs the life span has gone down from about 12 (my first was 11) to about 6....

HOWEVER, herself has met a few Bedlington terriers on her rounds and is most taken with them, and cant believe how soft the coat is - she keeps hinting that maybe when we cant cope with big dogs that is the way to go...

Don't have a dog; never had a dog and no intention of ever getting a dog. 

I see Wikepedia info fits in with all the points you make, especially the cancer and life span :- '......Cancer is the leading cause of death for dogs in general, but Bernese Mountain Dogs have a much higher rate of fatal cancer than other breeds; in both U.S./Canada and UK surveys, nearly half of Bernese Mountain Dogs die of cancer,.................................................. Compared to breeds of similar size as well as purebred dogs in general, the Bernese is one of the short-lived dog breeds. The average life expectancy of a Bernese Mountain Dog is approximately 7 to 8 years. Most other breeds of a similar size have median longevities of 10–11 years. In a 2004 UK survey, the longest-lived of 394 deceased Bernese Mountain Dogs died at the age of 15.2 years.........

3 of our 4 kids have a dogs - Pug, Labrador and Border Collie and each a Dyson DC41Mk2 Animal that appears every day to chase the relevant dog!

The Border Collie fan (4 dogs - 1,2, and currently back down to 1 over, 30 years) spends more energy hoovering and more money on Dyson insurance than I spend on the wife. Mind he is a fanatic; cleans his car 2  - 3 times a week - buys special cloths for waxing and polishing!

The point of this is - I am told the Bedlington Terrier casts very little of it's coat and therefore save you time and money - Wikipedia info - '.......Median longevity of Bedlington Terriers, based on two recent UK surveys, is about 13.5 years, which is longer than for purebred dogs in general and longer than most breeds similar in size.The longest-lived of 48 deceased dogs in a 2004 UK Kennel Club survey was 18.4 years. Leading causes of death among Bedlington Terriers in the UK were old age (23%),......

Give her in doors a treat pilgrim - next dog to while away an easy retirement should be "linty-haired terrier". 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bedlington_Terrier

p.s. - I once had a goldfish - 1953 to 1964 (approx) and feeding that was chore.

Bought my first garden shed in the 1980's and the kids got a Rex Rabbit that took over my shed for 4-5 years - that was the one and only rabbit.

Then they wanted a budgie, took me months to train it to fly to the open window!

Me mate asked us to look after his budgie when he went on holiday. Day 1, let ours and his out of their cages for a bit exercise. Me mates flew straight into the front window and dropped to the floor. Two adults, two kids, girls, plus a cardboard box with one lifeless budgie in it spent two hours at the local vets. Can't remember what it cost but there wasn't a quick 'pick-me-up'. We had to take in home where it crawled around the bottom of it's cage for a week. Had to Make 1/2" food and drink containers, both sellotaped to the bottom of the cage as it couldn't get to it's feeding boxes on the side of the cage. After about a week it actually dragged itself up it's ladder on to a perch so at least it could now get to it's normal feeding stations! I never saw it anywhere else, for the next week other, than on that perch.

Explained the incident to me mate - I was never asked to look after it again and it stayed on the perch and never flew again, for the rest of it's life. It's name was Barney and we christened it 'Barney the brain dead budgie'.

Ours eventually took the hint and flew out the open window.    

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3 hours ago, pilgrim said:

er- noticed that bit earlier about owners looking like their dogs... I have a Bernese mountain dog and have had them for many years - a bigger dafter more affable dog you couldn't find, but over the last 30 yrs the life span has gone down from about 12 (my first was 11) to about 6 - last one died 2 weeks afore 6th b/day - cancer takes most of them. But have hopes for the present one as father was brought in from Scandinavia and mother is of a good line. its never easy getting a dog that you know doesn't last long but i'm well taken with the breed, but then I like big dogs.

HOWEVER, herself has met a few Bedlington terriers on her rounds and is most taken with them, and cant believe how soft the coat is - she keeps hinting that maybe when we cant cope with big dogs that is the way to go...

Very popular here as well, Pilgrim. The youngest son has one and, as you rightly say, a bigger, dafter, more affable dog you couldn't find. Unfortunately, their life span isn't much longer here - 8 years.

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