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Loathe: The Grey Prefabs Around The Oval Area!

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Like Terrier Close?

System built houses with a brick veneer, or are they 'prefabs' ...... lol

terrier close is not system built! tha normal council brick built houses! what you gob shiting for? :blink:

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terrier close is not system built! tha normal council brick built houses! what you gob shiting for? :blink:

Built on a steel frame which takes the load from the brick skin, the interior walls are made of some strange fibrous material skimmed with plaster. I remember them being built and have done some work in them, system built 4 sure.

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Built on a steel frame which takes the load from the brick skin, the interior walls are made of some strange fibrous material skimmed with plaster. I remember them being built and have done some work in them, system built 4 sure.

My mums house in the west end of bedlington must be a pre-fab too then. it has a steel frame, and the internal walls are 'egg boxed' plasterboard sections :blink:

Apparently they were gonna be condemed a while back due to the steel rusting (no rustproofing applied as recomended)

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Built on a steel frame which takes the load from the brick skin, the interior walls are made of some strange fibrous material skimmed with plaster. I remember them being built and have done some work in them, system built 4 sure.

maybe but there not prefabs! cant see ashcroft and douglas living in a prefab! :blink:

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Please tell us what you consider to be a 'prefab' .......lol

There used to be prefabs down Milfield didn`t there? them little tin houses..they`re prefabs :D

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Please tell us what you consider to be a 'prefab' .......lol

only told you about ten times! and prove my point every time!

but still you cant accept that you where wrong!

bah you mek is sick! :lol::lol::lol:

for the final time......

Prefabricated homes, often referred to as prefab homes, are dwellings manufactured off-site in advance, usually in standard sections that can be easily shipped and assembled. Many of the current prefab home designs on the market have jovial, eclectic elements of postmodernism or the clean, simple lines of futurism. Prefab homes have not been particularly marketable; possible reasons for this include:

Homes are not currently produced cost effectively enough for current demand.

Homes are not considered a realistic housing solution by the average consumer.

The consumer is either not familiar with the concept, or does not desire it.

Recently, however, modern architects are experimenting more often with prefabrication as a means to deliver well-designed and mass-produced modern homes. Modern architecture forgoes referential decoration and instead features clean lines and open floor plans. Because of this, many feel modern architecture is better suited to benefit from prefabrication.

The word "Prefab" is not an industry term like modular home, manufactured home, panelized home, or site-built home. The term is an amalgamation of panelized and modular building systems, and can mean either one. In today's usage the term "Prefab" is more closely related to the style of home, usually modernist, rather than to a particular method of home construction.

In the United Kingdom the word "Prefab" is often associated with a specific type of prefabricated house built in large numbers during the Second World War as a temporary replacement for housing that had been destroyed by bombs, particularly in London. Despite the intention that these dwellings would be a strictly temporary measure, many remained inhabited for years and even decades after the end of the war. A small number are still in use well into the 21st Century.

A new development of modern prefabricated homes are currently being built in Milton Keynes, England. Designed be renowned architect Lord Richard Rogers, designer of the Lloyds building the Millenium Dome and the Pompidou Centre in Paris, these new 'prefab' homes are part of a wider government objective to breath new building methods into the housing market within the United Kingdom and show that 'Prefab' is not only still alive, but also well respected.

A prefab material can be used in a quick, easy and fast installation of any structure like a house, home, storage, cabin or garage. The prefab material is becoming popular to construct any building structure as it is cheap, fast to build and durable. The prefab home or house requires much less labor as compared to conventional houses or homes. Most of the companies are selling complete pre manufactured prefab modular homes or houses called "mobile homes" or "manufactured homes". Prefab homes are becoming popular in Europe, Canada and United States as they are cheap and durable. Local building codes LBC do not apply to prefab homes or houses; instead, these houses are built according to specialized guidelines called (Federal HUD regulations in the United States) for manufactured housing. Manufactured homes are not permitted in some communities and therefore, one should check from their local city to find about prefab building and construction laws regarding prefab homes

 

;):lol::lol::lol:  

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saying:

LOOK HERE

would have been quicker...

eh how would that be quicker! you still got to read it! please think before posting! :lol::lol::lol:

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eh how would that be quicker! you still got to read it! please think before posting! :lol::lol::lol:

because if you had done it like that, i wouldnt have started reading it thinking it was your opinion and not just cut and pasted from a website.

if i wanted the websites opinion, i'd go there myself and read it!

the question was what was YOUR definition of a prefab, not what can you find on the internet about it!

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because if you had done it like that, i wouldnt have started reading it thinking it was your opinion and not just cut and pasted from a website.

if i wanted the websites opinion, i'd go there myself and read it!

the question was what was YOUR definition of a prefab, not what can you find on the internet about it!

wey that was my opinion! its the truth! so what the point in lying about it! like terrier close are prefabs! :lol::lol::lol:

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They are mostly pulled down and rebuilt now. They are the same size as the prefabs as the kept the same foundations but I think the insides are a different design. Some of them have bay windows. They haven't been built brick by brick though. They brought whole walls on a lorry and seemed to just slot them into place! I didn't know you could get flat packed houses! Does this class them as a new breed of prefab I wonder? They look like normal brick houses with plaster on the top half which is painted yellow. I just hope they don't have any pink paint added later on like the houses next to wansbeck hospital. They look like giant battenburg cakes! :lol::rolleyes:

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Whilst Googleing for Airey houses to see if I could add to Foxy's new topic 'Then And Now' this old thread from this site came up. The definite answer on Airey Houses can be found in Wikipedia. Our family moved into Coquetdale Place in 1949:-

:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airey_house

An Airey house is a type of prefabricated house built in Great Britain following World War II.

Designed by Sir Edwin Airey to the Ministry of Works Emergency Factory Made housing programme, it features a frame of prefabricated concrete columns reinforced with tubing recycled from the frames of military vehicles. A series of ship-lap style concrete panels, tied back to the columns, form the external envelope.

In 1947, the Central Office of Information commissioned a propaganda film, Country Homes. The directoral debut of the later acclaimed documentary maker Paul Dickson, the film promotes the building of Airey houses in rural areas as a solution to the poor condition (due to the 1930s depression followed by wartime neglect) of much of the housing stock outside Britain's conurbations, due to the ease with which the prefabricated sections could be transported to remote locations.

Today many of the Airey houses; being over 50 years old, are in disrepair. The houses are one of a number of precast concrete systems listed in the Housing Defects Act. This meant that Government help for private owners was available in certain cases. Generally they are not accepted for mortgages unless repaired in accordance with certain prescribed methods. In the mid-2000s, one company began testing a refurbishment programme. Their programme involves replacing the concrete slabs with blocks, covered the blocks with insulation, and then facing the structure with brick. It is hoped this remodel will result in a warmer and more structurally sound house.

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