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Monsta®

Loathe: The Grey Prefabs Around The Oval Area!

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when they ganna pull them doon tha stinking!

They have been there a long time Monsta, they used to call them Arial houses I think.

:D

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What have they replaced them with?

Of the ones I know of (Havent been passed there for a while) they pulled a street down and now it's just grass where the houses were.

There were a lot of houses boarded up too... dont know if it's just the fact that no one wants to live there, but there were rumors of the council trying to buy people out of their homes so that they can pull more down.

Dont know if thats true...

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Of the ones I know of (Havent been passed there for a while) they pulled a street down and now it's just grass where the houses were.

There were a lot of houses boarded up too... dont know if it's just the fact that no one wants to live there, but there were rumors of the council trying to buy people out of their homes so that they can pull more down.

Dont know if thats true...

They were strange houses, a friend of mine used to live in one opposite Fontburn Road. The fire place was like a square box that was not fixed to the wall, it had a pipe for a chimney and it acted as an oven and hob.

They looked like they had droped blocks of concrete on an angle to build the walls.

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They looked like they had droped blocks of concrete on an angle to build the walls.

That's because they had! System building it was called. The same sort of system that brought us Ronan Point.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/s...000/2514277.stm

Except that I think you'll find that those in Bedlington were built to a lot higher standards, and hence survived much longer. Some much later private ones at Killingworth weren't!

You'll find that very few who lived in them (in the early days at least) had a wrong word to say about them - and that has to be the acid test. Virtually all have been replaced now, including all the prefabs (Millfield South etc.). So... I don't think you've much of a point on this one Monsta!

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That's because they had! System building it was called. The same sort of system that brought us Ronan Point.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/s...000/2514277.stm

Except that I think you'll find that those in Bedlington were built to a lot higher standards, and hence survived much longer. Some much later private ones at Killingworth weren't!

You'll find that very few who lived in them (in the early days at least) had a wrong word to say about them - and that has to be the acid test. Virtually all have been replaced now, including all the prefabs (Millfield South etc.). So... I don't think you've much of a point on this one Monsta!

No, most of them are still there at the Oval, theres only one street that I know of that has been pulled down and the rest are either borded up or rough looking.

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That's because they had! System building it was called. The same sort of system that brought us Ronan Point.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/s...000/2514277.stm

Except that I think you'll find that those in Bedlington were built to a lot higher standards, and hence survived much longer. Some much later private ones at Killingworth weren't!

You'll find that very few who lived in them (in the early days at least) had a wrong word to say about them - and that has to be the acid test. Virtually all have been replaced now, including all the prefabs (Millfield South etc.). So... I don't think you've much of a point on this one Monsta!

are you blind or do you never venture past beech grove? there's a whole estate at the oval as i noted in the opening post! so its a very valid post!

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are you blind or do you never venture past beech grove? there's a whole estate at the oval as i noted in the opening post! so its a very valid post!

Your right Monsta there is huge amount of them houses in the Oval area, when they built them they mixed them with brick houses.

I lived in that area when I was very young even before they built the shops.

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Your right Monsta there is huge amount of them houses in the Oval area, when they built them they mixed them with brick houses.

I lived in that area when I was very young even before they built the shops.

so did me granddad at the top on fontburn! long time ago!

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Airey houses ...... not prefabs ..... :rolleyes:

airey houses what thats just a common term for them! in the eyes of the estate agent/mortage lender/ bbc homes under the hammer they are called prefabricated houses! this was to aid the mass house shortages after the war! so get your facts right!!! :angry::lol:

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Airey houses ...... not prefabs ..... :rolleyes:

My house is airy,it blows a gale through the back door :lol:

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so did me granddad at the top on fontburn! long time ago!

I lived in Fontburn Road Monsta, lived there from when I was 4 years old until I was 18

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airey houses what thats just a common term for them! in the eyes of the estate agent/mortage lender/ bbc homes under the hammer they are called prefabricated houses! this was to aid the mass house shortages after the war! so get your facts right!!! :angry::lol:

I have, they are 'system built' houses not prefabricated.

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I have, they are 'system built' houses not prefabricated.

hahaha goon! prefab means system built or factory produced! :lol::lol::lol:  i.e the concrete slabs were created in a factory then assembled on site!  

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In the United Kingdom the word "Prefab" is often associated with a specific type of prefabricated house built in large numbers during the Second World War as a temporary replacement for housing that had been destroyed by bombs, particularly in London. Despite the intention that these dwellings would be a strictly temporary measure, many remained inhabited for years and even decades after the end of the war. A small number are still in use well into the 21st Century.

A new development of modern prefabricated homes are currently being built in Milton Keynes, England. Designed be renowned architect Lord Richard Rogers, designer of the Lloyds building the Millenium Dome and the Pompidou Centre in Paris, these new 'prefab' homes are part of a wider government objective to breath new building methods into the housing market within the United Kingdom and show that 'Prefab' is not only still alive, but also well respected.

A prefab material can be used in a quick, easy and fast installation of any structure like a house, home, storage, cabin or garage. The prefab material is becoming popular to construct any building structure as it is cheap, fast to build and durable. The prefab home or house requires much less labor as compared to conventional houses or homes. Most of the companies are selling complete pre manufactured prefab modular homes or houses called "mobile homes" or "manufactured homes". Prefab homes are becoming popular in Europe, Canada and United States as they are cheap and durable. Local building codes LBC do not apply to prefab homes or houses; instead, these houses are built according to specialized guidelines called (Federal HUD regulations in the United States) for manufactured housing. Manufactured homes are not permitted in some communities and therefore, one should check from their local city to find about prefab building and construction laws regarding prefab homes

source "wikipedia.com"

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hahaha goon! prefab means system built or factory produced! :lol::lol::lol: i.e the concrete slabs were created in a factory then assembled on site!

Like bricks are?

so the difference between a prefabricated house and a non-prefabricated house is mortar?

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Like bricks are?

so the difference between a prefabricated house and a non-prefabricated house is mortar?

i but brick buildings are built to last!

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