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Ken Russell In The Market Place Club!

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Guest missvic

Did anyone else see the documentary on BBC4 tonight?

It was sad to see the area in all it's brilliance 40 years or so ago. I'm just a relative young 'un but I remember Bedlington, Ashington et al before the miners strike hit (and for some time after); perhaps I'm overly nostalgic, but I remember clearly a community spirit and a sense of pride for the area that isn't about anymore. It's upsetting to think that the only community spirit around these days is served up in the local hostelries, and even that's deteriorating!

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Did anyone else see the documentary on BBC4 tonight?

It was sad to see the area in all it's brilliance 40 years or so ago. I'm just a relative young 'un but I remember Bedlington, Ashington et al before the miners strike hit (and for some time after); perhaps I'm overly nostalgic, but I remember clearly a community spirit and a sense of pride for the area that isn't about anymore. It's upsetting to think that the only community spirit around these days is served up in the local hostelries, and even that's deteriorating!

I didn't see it all, but I did see the bit about the miners picnic, it brough back a lot of memorys.

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I didn't see it all, but I did see the bit about the miners picnic, it brough back a lot of memorys.

Of course I didn't see it, but I am sure it will turn up on BBC Canada eventually. It just reminds me of how things used to be. We had tough times and tough people to weather them, but despite our petty feuds and fusses, there was always a sense of mutual respect among neighbours. If anyone trouble in the family, the grievances were forgotten, and everyone rallied round to do what they could to help. And though they might fight outside the pub on a weekend, let a stranger be in the neighborhood, and they were taken in with open arms, and treated with the utmost respect and hospitality. It was the "Geordie way", and you didn't have to have a lot to give what you could, or share what little you had.

They may be gone, but it's a loss to everyone. Good people in bad times!

Joe

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I watched the show and while I was happy to see anything on national TV about the old homestead why do they always equate pits and pitmen with brass bands when there is and was so much more. I know they followed a theme in the original but it does reinforce the "cloth cap and whippet" image the rest of the country if not world has of the area.

What happened to those days Joe, someone decided to initiate a system of greed and avarice into society for political gains and thereby destroyed community cultures!

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" There is no such thing as society " - Margret Thatcher - Former Prime minster, war criminal ... and milk bottle snatcher

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" There is no such thing as society " - Margret Thatcher - Former Prime minster, war criminal ... and milk bottle snatcher

Woh, get the Crass LP's out!

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Unfortunately, I missed the programme but some clips can be seen here, not as good as the telly I suppose?

Looking through my bookmarks I find more here, Who remembers Delrosa :unsure:

Delrosa, I rememder picking rose hips and getting 4d a pound for them at the chemists, it's surprising how many you had to pick to make up a pound. It was somthing that most kids did in the fifties to earn a few pennies, ah it brings back some good memories.

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Delrosa, I rememder picking rose hips and getting 4d a pound for them at the chemists, it's surprising how many you had to pick to make up a pound. It was somthing that most kids did in the fifties to earn a few pennies, ah it brings back some good memories.

We used to go out in classes to pick them during the war. Of course we never got any money for them. They told us we were doing for the war effort. Now it would be seen as child abuse!

Joe.

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We used to go out in classes to pick them during the war. Of course we never got any money for them. They told us we were doing for the war effort. Now it would be seen as child abuse!

Joe.

That's a shame Joe, in addition to the rose hips we used to go down to the river and catch eels, the chemists would buy the skins, they were buggers to catch though. We used a fork tied to the end of a stick.

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Did you also travel by raft down the ol' Mississippi with your good friend Huckleberry Finn? ;)

Kidding aside, these old tales are interesting.

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Did you also travel by raft down the ol' Mississippi with your good friend Huckleberry Finn? ;)

Kidding aside, these old tales are interesting.

Do any of you remember sabre-toothed tigers then?! :P

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Do any of you remember sabre-toothed tigers then?! :P

No CK, but I did cruise up the Mississippi from New Orleans on a five day river cruise. Interesting and fun, and no Sabre toothed tigers. But some pretty shifty characters trying to "provide" all sorts of strange enjoyments!

And yes CK, the old days had their charms. I would hate to think that the memories and stories of the pre war generation are forgotten. Especially since the school age generation are growing up with scant respect for their ancestors times and achievements. Not to mention their work ethic!

Joe

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Do any of you remember sabre-toothed tigers then?! :P

Never seen one of then Denzel but a did see a wooly mamath doon the hapney woods one day, mind you a had visited the Bank top before going there. :rolleyes:

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We used to go out in classes to pick them during the war. Of course we never got any money for them. They told us we were doing for the war effort. Now it would be seen as child abuse!

Joe.

Times have certainly Joe, I remember following the pit tractor and trailer (it used to be a horse and cart at one time) when they where delivering the coal to peoples houses, we would knock on the door and ask if we could put the coal in for them. We used to get anything from a shilling to two bob.

Ringtons tea was delivered by horse and cart as well even the ice cream man used come around at night with a horse and cart, I believe his name was Jacky Bell. Ah well that's another story.

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Never seen one of then Denzel but a did see a wooly mamath doon the hapney woods one day, mind you a had visited the Bank top before going there. :rolleyes:

:lol::lol::lol:

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Times have certainly Joe, I remember following the pit tractor and trailer (it used to be a horse and cart at one time) when they where delivering the coal to peoples houses, we would knock on the door and ask if we could put the coal in for them.

I not only had to move the coal but occasionally a couple of tons of horse !*[email protected]# delivered to the door....lol

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I not only had to move the coal but occasionally a couple of tons of horse !*[email protected]# delivered to the door....lol

Ah yes I remember the horse muck and having to cart it to the bottom of the garden, also going with my grandad and collecting sheep muck from the fields for the leeks. Red ash from the pit heaps was another favourite for the garden although I don't know what good it did.

Memories of days gone by.

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Ah yes I remember the horse muck and having to cart it to the bottom of the garden, also going with my grandad and collecting sheep muck from the fields for the leeks. Red ash from the pit heaps was another favourite for the garden although I don't know what good it did.

Memories of days gone by.

Bloody hell. You didn't get put in the stocks as well did you?!

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Twice Denzel, but I wasent considered worth investing in.

Comic gold.

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Did anyone else see the documentary on BBC4 tonight?

Faithfully captured on a DVR near you.

Stills - and maybe even a commentary - soon(ish)!

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Faithfully captured on a DVR near you.

Stills - and maybe even a commentary - soon(ish)!

Excellent. 'Thaz been a lot of allegations made, and a wanna knaa wee thu alligators are'.

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