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  1. Yesterday
  2. 1. Which household appliance was patented by Cecil Booth in 1901? Answer = Vacuum cleaner 2. In bookmaker’s slang what odds are denoted by ‘double carpet’ Answer = 33/1 3. Who did Bjorn Borg defeat in 1976 to win his first Wimbledon singles title? Answer = Ilie Năstase 4. What is the more common name of the chemical Ethylene Glycol? Answer = (CH2OH)2 - antifreeze 5. In what year were dog licences abolished in Britain? Answer = 1987 6. On a Monopoly board, which property clockwise is situated after the Water Works? Answer = Regent Street = UK Marven Gardens = Canada Sturplan = Sweden 7. In which part of the British Isles would you find bailiwicks? Answer = Channel Islands 8. In which war was the battle of Gettysburg? Answer = American Civil War Lasting three days in 1863, from July 1-3, Gettysburg was the bloodiest battle ever fought on American soil, with up to 10,000 Union and Confederate troops dead and another 30,000 wounded. But surprisingly, this tremendous battle was a purely unplanned accident that grew out of a desperate need for soldiers' shoes! 9. By what name is the plant Lonicera better known? Answer = Honeysuckle 10. Which Archbishop of Canterbury seized the devil’s nose in a pair of red-hot tongs? Answer = Dunstan Dunstan immediately seized the devil's nose with his redhot tongs, causing the devil to leap the eight miles to cool his proboscis in the Tunbridge spring, thus lending the water its celebrated chalybeate qualities. 11. What is the longest river in Scotland? Answer = Tay 12. What is the medical name for Rabies? Answer = before I jumped into the cold water at Humford Baths I had Hydrophobia. I’ll bet you didn’t know …. In 1877 a wealthy widow promised Russian composer Tchaikovsky a generous annual allowance – on condition that they never met. Answer = I didn’t. Does that mean that Tchaikovsky and Władysław Pachulski invented Texting?
  3. A couple of questions: Did you have a great grandmother called Catherine? Did your grandparents or great grandparents have any connections with Scotland? Do you recognise any of the following names: Annie, Patrick, Gilbert, Margaret?
  4. Unfortunately not @Odin Dunne If you know what part of Bedlington ie, Top End or Bedlington Station/Sleekburn your relatives lived there narrowing what school they might have attended, or if they worked at one of the pits in Bedlington we might be able to give you info or photos about the area.
  5. Last week
  6. Hello. My grandfather John Carr was born in Bedlington in 1891. His father was Christopher. Does anyone know anything about them?
  7. 1. Which household appliance was patented by Cecil Booth in 1901? Vacuum cleaner 2. In bookmaker’s slang what odds are denoted by ‘double carpet’ 33/1 3. Who did Bjorn Borg defeat in 1976 to win his first Wimbledon singles title? Ilie Năstase 4. What is the more common name of the chemical Ethylene Glycol? antifreeze 5. In what year were dog licences abolished in Britain? 1987 6. On a Monopoly board, which property clockwise is situated after the Water Works? Marvin Gardens (should read Marven Gardens) 7. In which part of the British Isles would you find bailiwicks? Jersey 8. In which war was the battle of Gettysburg? US Civil War 9. By what name is the plant Lonicera better known? Honeysuckle 10. Which Archbishop of Canterbury seized the devil’s nose in a pair of red-hot tongs? Archbishop Dunstan 11. What is the longest river in Scotland? River Tay 12. What is the medical name for Rabies? hydrophobia.
  8. 1. Which household appliance was patented by Cecil Booth in 1901? Vacuum cleaner 2. In bookmaker’s slang what odds are denoted by ‘double carpet’ 3. Who did Bjorn Borg defeat in 1976 to win his first Wimbledon singles title? Ille Nastase 4. What is the more common name of the chemical Ethylene Glycol? Anti Freeze 5. In what year were dog licences abolished in Britain? 1986 6. On a Monopoly board, which property clockwise is situated after the Water Works? 7. In which part of the British Isles would you find bailiwicks? Channel Islands 8. In which war was the battle of Gettysburg? American War of Independence 9. By what name is the plant Lonicera better known? Honeysuckle 10. Which Archbishop of Canterbury seized the devil’s nose in a pair of red-hot tongs? 11. What is the longest river in Scotland? The Tay 12. What is the medical name for Rabies? Hydrophobia
  9. Time to keep the grey cell in trim! 1. Which household appliance was patented by Cecil Booth in 1901? 2. In bookmaker’s slang what odds are denoted by ‘double carpet’ 3. Who did Bjorn Borg defeat in 1976 to win his first Wimbledon singles title? 4. What is the more common name of the chemical Ethylene Glycol? 5. In what year were dog licences abolished in Britain? 6. On a Monopoly board, which property clockwise is situated after the Water Works? 7. In which part of the British Isles would you find bailiwicks? 8. In which war was the battle of Gettysburg? 9. By what name is the plant Lonicera better known? 10. Which Archbishop of Canterbury seized the devil’s nose in a pair of red-hot tongs? 11. What is the longest river in Scotland? 12. What is the medical name for Rabies? I’ll bet you didn’t know …. In 1877 a wealthy widow promised Russian composer Tchaikovsky a generous annual allowance – on condition that they never met. Answers on Thursday, as usual!
  10. Want the top news headlines sent to your inbox daily? Sign up to our FREE newsletter below A further two coronavirus cases have been confirmed at a Northumberland school. The new infections come within 24 hours of a staff member at St Benet Biscop Catholic Academy in Bedlington t esting positive. In addition, a "small number of pupils" are now self-isolating after coming into direct contact with the confirmed cases. In a letter to parents, headteacher Kevin Shepherd accepts parents will find the latest development "concerning". "We are continuing to monitor the situation and are working closely with Public Health England," he added. The letter was sent to parents on Thursday, a day after it emerged two members of staff were self-isolating.
  11. Answers to last week's quiz: 1. Kenya 2. Mercury 3. Senate 4. Retsina 5. Kidney 6. Mark Spitz 7. The Kray twins 1952 8. Salmanazar 9. CATS 10. 121 11. An eyrie 12. Combustion New quiz tomorrow!
  12. I know the feeling, Jammy! Last week I got the left and right of a photo mixed up. I think It's an 'age thing' - well, that's my excuse and I'm sticking to it!
  13. Yesterday full Council saw Glen Sanderson elected as the new Council Leader with a new Deputy also in place alongside some changes in the Cabinet. Hopefully this will be the beginning of some normality after weeks of upheaval that has got in the way of delivering for residents. On that very issue of putting residents first, Russ Wallace asked a question about whether the current administration were in agreement about providing funding for leisure facilities in Bedlington given that Newbiggin Sports Centre has recently had £1.5m approved from the Council pot; great for Newbiggin but what about Bedlington was the point. The response from the Cabinet Member was an extremely positive one and in-line with our previous discussions about the need to include leisure in the town centre redevelopment. Bedlington was additionally recognised as a town that had been forgotten and there is a definite commitment from the current administration to address a fact that we all recognise. What was less positive, however, was an intervention from the Labour Leader, who failed to take the opportunity to offer any support for Bedlington and instead was more concerned about asking who had written the response for the Cabinet Member. A FOI request is apparently going to be submitted to find out and I can only assume that the Labour Leader thinks officers at the Council have nothing better to do at the minute than deal with something that has never previously been queried in my three plus years as a County Councillor. So, yet again, it appears that Labour are simply not prepared to prioritise Bedlington. Well, there is no need for anyone to submit a FOI request to confirm something that we already know!
  14. I did notice that but as I am not a member of the Megalithic.co.uk Portal, and I didn't want to join, I couldn't point out the error in the text but thought it was worth a mention just to show that others, outside of Bedlington, know of the town.🙂
  15. Sign up to our newsletter for the latest Northumberland news Two members of staff at a Northumberland school are self-isolating after one of them tested positive for coronavirus. St Benet Biscop Catholic Academy, in Bedlington, has said the infected staff member is well but is spending two weeks at home in quarantine. The secondary school and sixth form has decided to not send any students home as a result of the confirmed case due to the employee's limited contact with pupils. However, another member of staff has also been asked to self-isolate for a fortnight following advice from Public Health England. A letter to parents and carers from headteacher Kevin Shepherd reads: "A member of staff at St Benet Biscop has tested positive for Covid-19 and is therefore self-isolating. The staff member is well and is self-isolating at home. "I have been in contact with the Public Health England Protection Team to discuss the situation and the potential risk to other students and staff.
  16. @Canny lass you will be correct. I can remember looking at the Howard terrace wall sign. Just got the wall it was affixed to at the wrong end of the terrace.
  17. The Megalithic Portal doesn't make any sense to me. How can "Jim Swanns early 18th century diaries" possibly suggest that the cross was built in the late 18th century "1792". He must have written his diary BEFORE the cross was built!
  18. I think it might be the other way round, Jammy. Howard Terrace came first. Reedy's dad described the area in the 1950s -60s and said "Starting at what used to be Joe Jennings farm and shop including Mansion House now possibly 'Smiles' was Glassey Terrace. The first 7 houses were originally named Howard Terrace but the name was changed to Glassey Terrace as a result of misdirected mail as another Howard Terrace existed in Netherton". Howard Terrace must therefore have started at Mansion House and could only be extended towards the Bank Top. Looking at the present day Glassey Terrace it's possible to see where the extension started because of the differing roof- and upstairs window heights: I'm pretty certain I've seen Howard Terrace in an early census. I'll see if I can find it. There was a Howard terrace at Netherton Colliery. It was renamed Office Row but I don't know when.
  19. Thank you Vic - the cool air in the computer halls was heaven to me☺️. We moved from Cramlington =North facing living room to Seghill = South facing living room. At Cramlington the wife was always turning the heat up and now at Seghill she basks in the sun streaming in through the South facing window and I hide in my little cool room in the middle of the bungalow.
  20. All I can contribute to this conversation is that I worked with an electrical contractor installing the HVAC system that cooled these massive "advanced" computers at Longbenton......
  21. @Jammy A short history on the ‘Ministry’ at Longbenton where the National Insurance clerical records and subsequent electronic data base on everyone in the UK that was working or retired. The National Insurance Act started in 1911 and War pensions were paid from 1916.The department was expanded by the Labour government in 1948 to cover many more benefits. The system has been subjected to numerous amendments in succeeding years. Initially, it was a contributory form of insurance against illness and unemployment, and eventually provided retirement pensions and other benefits. In 1953 the Pensions system and National Insurance (NI) systems combined to form the Ministry of Pensions and National Insurance (MPNI) and they took over the site at Longbenton = one full group containing the 100 sections of all the clerical record sheets = an NI record sheet with full ID + address + NI contributions paid And another group containing the 52 sections and all the clerical record sheets for everyone receiving a state retirement pension. So at that point in time the MPNI had a clerical record of all the workers and pensioners. The MPNI change its name in 1963 to The Department of Social Services = DSS as most people of our age new it by when we started work. The first generation of computer systems was started in October 1961 (think it was the 4th of October) and the Graduated Pension(GP) scheme was introduced. Initially it would mean more money into the pension fund and when people retired an addition to their pension = for every £7.50 a worker paid in Graduated Pension they would get an extra 6 pence per week on top of their pension. My first wage in 1965 was about £4.10 so it took a number of years to contribute £7.50 to get a tanner in retirement. But what the start of the GP scheme did in 1961was introduce the first NI computer system on the Longbenton site. It didn’t contain full NI records but it was the start and in preparation for the next generation of computer systems to be introduced in 1970 (ICL 1906A computers with 256Killobytes (NOT GIG or MEGA TERRA etc .etc. bytes). The State Pensions (SP) scheme started its own computer system, on the Longbenton site, and in them days they did not talk to each other electronically. Updates to the records from one system to another was by writing the updates to magnetic tape and passing the tape to the other system so they could read the tape and process the updates. By 1970, 2nd Generation systems, all the info on all the NI clerical records = all active and records of those deceased (don’t know how many million it was) had been typed into a machine that added the data onto magnetic tapes. As there were 100 NI sections (00 to 99 = the last two digits of everyone’s NI number) there were what would now be called 100 separate databases containing an address for every household in the UK that had a worker paying, or had paid NI. The same applied to the clerical pension records but they had 52 sections = 1 for every week of the year as you pension number was based on the week of the year you were born (Jan 1st to 7th pension number ended in 01 – born Dec 25th to 31st pension number ended in 52). Following that all benefit systems, eg Family Allowance (FA), had their own computer systems and databases (tape) with address records + benefit data and data updates between the systems was buy sending a magnetic tape from one system to whatever other system needed an update to its records. The 1980s saw the 3rd generation of computer systems (ICL 2980s) but the transfer of data between systems was still via magnetic tape. In 1990 things started to move faster and the new systems, 4th generation, could update each other electronically. By then everyone in the UK had a record on one of the systems so every address in the UK was on one or more of the systems. Since then the new generations were not 10 years apart; all magnetic tape records were now on discs (terrabytes in size), and all systems were updating each other electronically. So every system new about every other system and when letters had to be sent out each system could do their bit to keep the whole of the UK informed and not duplicate anything.
  22. When I lived in Jubilee Terrace any letters from the DWP, usually telling me I have a few pence pension rise, were always addressed Jubilee Terrace, Bank Top, Bedlington. This makes me wonder when did the DWP create a database of addresses. They were the only government department that used that address. I'm guessing that Howard Terrace was added to the end of Glassey Terrace sometime later. At a later date Howard terrace was name changed to Glassey terrace because of confusion with another Howard terrace at the Top End.
  23. Hi Alan, Thanks so much for taking the time to pull together the various maps and images and for adding the additional explanatory notes to them. It makes it all a lot clearer to me. Best wishes. Steve PS My great grandmother returned to Workington in 1919/20 to live with my grandfather (her eldest son who served Coldstream Guards 1905/08 & 1914/18) who was also a pre 1914 miner (hewer). She clearly made efforts to have her 2 youngest sons names recorded on the Bedlington RC Church WW1 memorial before she left the area (with a 4th son who had a disability and worked above ground at the pit) but presumably left before plans were being made to erect the Bedlington Civil War Memorial. She died in 1920 so my grandfather ensured his brothers names were recorded on the Workington War Memorial.
  24. Northumberland County Council article on the cross and the repair of 2010 costing £6,000.
  25. Restoration work on the cross carried out in 1970.
  26. Newspaper article post by John Krzyzanowski - Bygone Bedlington Facebook group. I've copied the article so it's easier to read.
  27. Photo, c1906, from Evan Martin's book - The Archive Photographs Series - Bedlingtonshire.
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