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  1. Today
  2. The deadline is looming for community groups, charities and young people in the county to apply for funding from a much valued community grant scheme.
  3. Yesterday
  4. moe19

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    Historic is nay good if ya want ta buy a pair of shoes or a shart an pants hinny , historic is nay good if ya want ta use a branch of ya bank Historic is nay good if ya oot on the street and want ta gan t the Lavvy. Its a doorty owld pit village hinny not Stonehenge, apart from St Cuthberts church it has really nowt else worth looking at. Its plagued with drink and drugs problems and vandalism an burglaries just the same as most places these days, what's left of the streets shops are a collection hairdressers, barbers, takeaways and tattoo parlours most of em hidden behind rusty owld shutters that rarely go up . What you call the market place is a mess of boarded up graffiti covered empty shops, with the so called historic buildings on the street sporting plastic widows and front doors from B&Q , satellite dishes blooming like mushrooms on the walls and air con units hinging oboot the place, All the empty lots and areas especially around the Court House are overgrown and full of rubbish. A rekon that optician ont front street must be selling some folk glasses wi rose tinted lenses 😎
  5. mercuryg

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    Yeah, I moved from a place where there is apparently nothing, to a place where there is actually nothing. You think Bedlington had potholes? You reckon the town has no facilities? Try here! The point I was making is that, to coin a phrase, you don't miss your water until your well runs dry. Bedlington is a pretty, historic and friendly town. Cherish it.
  6. Last week
  7. moe19

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    One of our so called historic buildings 🤣 I love the curtains, they may well be an original pair of Queen Victoria's old bloomers, with significant historical value 😂 It will take more than a few pots of pansies to tidy this place up
  8. webtrekker

    Gardeners Arms

    Happy times. We spent many an hour with our noses stuck up against Beadle's shop window. They had lots of small toys and trinkets to interest us kid's and we took turns at 'bargsying' items. We also loved the glass advertising signs stuck to many shop windows in those days. They were easily prised off with a pen knife by 'collectors' (er,.... or so I'm told!). Nice to see the West Sleekburn miners banner too.
  9. James

    Gardeners Arms

    I was confused with your comment about someone called JDJ Metcalf being the prominent and well respected breeder of Bedlington Terriers. As you state in your comment on your photo, the character you are referring to is Ned Metcalf. Jane D J Metcalf was Ned's wife and it would appear that the licence for the Gardeners Arms was in her name, as can be seen on the pub sign in your great photos of the pub. (I got this information from the 1939 census.)
  10. John Fox (foxy)

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    I usually stop and have a pint......love the place
  11. Alison Waters

    The colliery artist

    Does anyone know if these paintings can be viewed locally?
  12. Residents and staff at a Choppington care home are celebrating a good inspection.
  13. Eggy1948

    Ford Castle 1965c refocused named.jpg

    No 22 Colin Nichol thinks No 27 could be Audrey Reckelton ?
  14. webtrekker

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    Yes, Bedlington's a lovely place......... to pass through! 🚗 <<<<<<<<<<<<--------------
  15. moe19

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    Ya hit the nail rite on the heed hinny
  16. mercuryg

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    What a pity to find such comments as this. I no longer live there, but upon returning (as I regularly do) it's always a joy to drive down the wide, tree-lined Front Street - it looks lovely at this time of year - and admire the flowers and planters that have so lovingly been put together by volunteers who take pride in the town. I guess I'm not one to focus on the negatives. I'm a little perplexed by Rosco's comments about the Market Tavern; it's a private business, they don't have money to burn, at least they've made an effort. As for them 'only opening on limited days', in the same sentence you complain about Breaker's Bar, which is open every day! What do you want? Bars open, or bars closed? Shops are closing at an alarming rate: why? Because people don't use them. I don't know where you shop, but maybe directing your expenditure closer to home might see these shops NOT close, although like you I have little use for wool or ice cream. Moe: the sculptures you mention celebrate the history and culture of the town, which should surely be more prominent and encouraged. Bedlington was a world centre in the development of the railways, yet there's barely a mention. At least those who commissioned the works mentioned did so with this in mind. The village nearest tome here has a long-standing history of military service; you can't move an inch without being reminded of it. It's good that people are proud of the history of their town. Perhaps look for the positives next time; yes, parts of the town are run down and tired (and I'm amazed it's taken this long to notice) but others are very attractive, unique and welcoming.
  17. moe19

    The Gardeners Arms.

    I remember me father telling us that Neds wife or someone would bring his dinner in while he was working behind the bar, and no one would dare to get up and ask for a pint while he was eating it
  18. A businessman has been convicted of keeping a group of men as slaves – after he made them work 90-hour weeks in return for takeaway food and alcohol. Landlord Hargit Singh Bariana, 46, targeted vulnerable men who were left without homes due to alcoholism and drug addiction. The victims were all white British men – which the lead investigator said should challenge peoples’ perceptions of these types of cases which have previously predominantly seen victims trafficked from abroad. Bariana provided the men with accommodation, took all their housing benefit as payment and forced them to work. They were made to clean sewage pipes by hand and work 13-hour days in their bare feet. They did not receive a wage. Instead they were offered takeaway food and alcohol. Bariana would rely on their addictions and lack of accommodation to force them to work. If the victims refused he would then resort to violence and intimidation. It wasn’t until officers raided a property in the town linked to anti-social behaviour and drug use that police uncovered the offences. They found a number of men living in horrendous conditions who were initially too terrified to speak about their ordeal. When they did disclose the whole story to police, Bariana was arrested and later charged with eight offences under the Modern Day Slavery Act. Bariana, of Blue House Farm, Netherton, Bedlington, was charged with eight counts of requiring a person to perform forced or compulsory labour between 2009 and 2015. And at Newcastle Crown Court today (16 May) he was found guilty by a jury of six of those offences. He was also convicted of being concerned in the supply of Diazepam. Bariana was found not guilty of two of the force labour charges and also acquitted on a single count of robbery. He was remanded into custody by a judge and will be sentenced on the week commencing June 18 at the same court. Following the conviction, Chief Inspector Helena Barron said: “Hargit Bariana preyed on vulnerable victims for his own gain. “He relied on the fact that they were homeless with addictions to keep them under his control. “If they did not work then they feared they would lose their home and be unable to feed their addictions. “Previous slavery cases have highlighted the trafficking of vulnerable victims from abroad to work in this country. However, in this case all of the victims were white British men – which challenges people’s perception of this type of crime and highlights the fact anyone could find themselves subject to such offences. “It is a lesson for everyone that a victim of modern day slavery can come from any walk of life and any background. “Our message is that if something doesn’t look right then it probably isn’t right and we would encourage people to contact the police. “Often people don’t realise they are victims of slavery – so it is important in order to tackle this type of crime that we encourage local communities to stay vigilant and alert. “I want to take this opportunity to thank the victims in this case who have shown great bravery. “I would also like to recognise the hard work of our officers on this case, and for their continued efforts to target offenders benefiting at the expense of others. “Under the banner of Sanctuary, protecting those who find themselves vulnerable through a whole range of crimes including modern day slavery, is Northumbria Police’s number one priority.” Anyone who thinks they are a victim or any members of the public who have concerns about modern day slavery happening near them should ring police on 101 or call the Modern Slavery Helpline on 08000 121 700.
  19. moe19

    Bedlington........Dying On Its A..e

    Well said that man, Mind a suppose we should be grateful for what wa have, like the giant cardboard cut outs, one of Scooby-Doo (with a big boil on one of his lugs) and one of Thomas the Tank engine, down Atley Park, am not sure what the one on the entrance from Choppington is , but it looks like the grandfatha clock from the Addams Family hoouse. Rumour has it wa gana get a giant model of King Kong on top of the old council offices ta put the wind up all them gannin ta sign on 🤯
  20. Eggy1948

    Ford Castle 1965c refocused named.jpg

    Names added for Nos 15, 23, 24, 25, 32 & 38
  21. Earlier
  22. This round-up of events is written by readers. To get your event or story included, simply fill out the form www.chroniclelive.co.uk/schoolnews St. Cuthbert’s RC Primary School, North Shields, Headteacher Shaun Dillon said: “Sixteen year 5 and 6 pupils are in training to tackle the challenging Coast to Coast bike ride from Whitehaven to Tynemouth over four days from 23rd- 26th May. The children are making the 140-mile cycle in aid of international charity Children in Crossfire to help children across the world reach their full potential. "Support from the North Shields and school communities has been amazing. Rafa Benetiz and the Newcastle United squad have also supported the Super16 by sending a wonderful inspirational letter and donating signed footballs to help the children raise funds.” Young creatives from Jubilee Primary School in Wallsend welcomed BAFTA-nominated illustrator and picture book creator Joe Berger to their classroom for an interactive event, thanks to leading supply teaching agency First Class Supply and Seven Stories - The National Centre for Children’s Books Joe Berger is an award-winning freelance illustrator whose work has appeared in numerous international magazines and newspapers, book cover designs, animated shorts, title sequences and commercials. As part of the double-act Berger & Wyse, with Pascal Wyse, Joe has a weekly comic strip in the Guardian and the duo’s animated title sequence for BBC1’s Hustle was nominated for a BAFTA. Joe has illustrated over thirty books for different publishers, including Tracey Corderoy’s Hubble Bubble, Frank Cottrell Boyce’s Chitty Chitty Bang Bang series as well as his own Lyttle Lies series.
  23. Didn't/Hadn't realised how scruffy and run down Bedlington is till yesterday,we all know about council cutbacks etc and the long winded market place development but don't people take any pride with the appearance of house and gardens anymore I walked down to the post office at the spar and the state of front gardens in a lot of houses is embarrassing,now i appreciate some people ie elderly disabled may or cant keep gardens tidy but as for the rest..........come on have some pride in your house do you really want to live in a house that looks a 5h1thole from the outside Later on i walked up to Boots in Front street and first impressions on a nice sunny day looking up from Northumberland Arms towards Red Lion is good........but on closer inspection Oh dear what a mess. Excluding the the Tesco/Great Wall Of Bedlington Site shops are closing at an alarming rate....The Wool Shop,Durham Beds and Theresa's Ices.on a plus note it was good to see workman inside the old Lloyd's Pharmacy shop but i will reserve judgement until i see what opens no doubt another hair/nail/takeaway or cafe The Development of the Lairds House was supposed to have stated by now or have owners decided its a dead loss and what on earth is going on in the Barrington Arms it looks like a cheap conversion to flats done really badly I presume the new owners of Market Tavern are running on a shoestring judging by hand written signs in windows and the shockingly bad plastic hanging baskets as well as only opening on limited days to sell cheap beer.Which brings me nicely to another problem in the Front Street.....Breakers Bar and its clientele who were congregated outside in full view and what a smart bunch they were🤣Bedlingtons finest.On a side note has there been a increase in single male/unemployed/drink/drug related people moving to our town recently or do all the lowlife head to Breakers Bar during the day Do we have no litter bins in Bedlington or are people just to lazy to walk over to them and would rather chuck it on the ground and who will no doubt vandalise the flower planters on a Friday night.Of course as well as no bins🤭we have no toilets.....every town centre has at least one working public loo except Bedlington. I used to be proud to live in a nice town but when people now ask where i live i'm almost embarrassed to tell them Bedlington
  24. Eggy1948

    31968205 named.jpg

    Names updated and Bob Baxter, after you have jogged his memory, has confirmed No 33 is Lorna Naisby.
  25. Canny lass

    31968205 named.jpg

    8 Confirm Joe Potts 11 Don’t think this is Norman Carr 16 Anne Amos 17 Ann Moore 20 Margaret Morton 21 Christine Ainsley 24 Confirm Edith Mullen 30 Denise Goves 31 Ann Bower 32 Margaret Coppin 33 Lorna Naisby/Nesbitt ?
  26. Eggy1948

    The Gardeners Arms.

    1953 - July. Peter Arris - Chairman of the BTNE club - has posted the full picture for me along with this info :- Here is a picture of William Luker (extreme right). Notice old Ned Metcalf kneeling, he never did dress up for the occasion, I think he went to bed wearing that old 1890’s style bonnet. None of this, is in my particular period of enquiry, so I have never looked at it before with any great interest. However, the name Luker intrigued me, certainly not one that we often encounter in Northumberland. So, with a little bit of digging, I discovered that his father was a stone mason and surprise, surprise married into the Thomson family of Bedlington terrier fame. His wife was called Lily Victoria Luker. Died 1957. He joined the National Bedlington Terrier Club committee about 1953, (no sign of his cup there unfortunately) though it was won by Miss Heron another NBT member in a non-connected show in Morpeth in 1953 and not heard of again, possibly she kept it. They were supposed to be returned to the show secretary each year. It would appear that during that time. The National Bedlington Terrier Club was again in a state of turmoil and instability. With the old and the new members each having serious differences of opinion on how it should be run, or if it should even remain faithful to its roots in Bedlington, as new Bedlington Terrier clubs started to appear in the southern regions of the U.K. It would appear that the working class, cloth cap image was not to the liking of the newer members. It did not take them long, to forget the history of our beloved Terriers.
  27. The man whose body was found inside a home in Frances Ville, Choppington, on Friday morning has been named by Northumbria Police.
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