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  3. 1. Of which instrument was the sackbut a forerunner? Answer = 2. Which Riviera fishing village was an independent republic from the 15th to the 17th century? Answer = 3. What are young grouse or partridge called? Answer = Cheeper 4. Who invented the steam turbine in 1884? Answer = Charles Parsons 5. What is your philtrum? Answer = 6. Arch, whorl and loops are all part of what? Answer = 7. Which fruit was discovered by Christopher Columbus in Guadeloupe in 1493? Answer =
  4. 1. Of which instrument was the sackbut a forerunner? Trombone 2. Which Riviera fishing village was an independent republic from the 15th to the 17th century? Genoa 3. What are young grouse or partridge called? Poult 4. Who invented the steam turbine in 1884? Charles Parsons 5. What is your philtrum? The groove between the nose and upper lip. 6. Arch, whorl and loops are all part of what? Fingerprints 7. Which fruit was discovered by Christopher Columbus in Guadeloupe in 1493? Pineapple 8. Which s
  5. Fascinating, thanks again @Canny lass
  6. @Malcolm - as expected no links to any documentation on The Grey Lady - just stories past down through the generations. You could look for the lady yourself - buy a flat in the hall or a house on the estate :- One last comment from someone living there now :- Sue Jensen We’ve lived there since the conversion 18 yrs ago. (In the servants wing) Builders working on it said they had experiences of things happening. I have occasionally felt like a human sized draft passing me but never been scared. May just be my imagination
  7. You're welcome, Heather. It filled a few hours of a grey, rainy day for one confined to barracks waiting for the Covid vaccination to come my way. The Trotter's do seem to be an interesting family and I'm posting the entry from Burkes Family Records, compiled in 1897, where you (and anybody else interested in the family) can see the development from Robert, the father of the three Dr Trotter(s). It's Robert who is the subject of the main entry and as spouse names and children's names are entered there are lots of ways forward for research. Burkes records the geneology o
  8. Last week
  9. 1. Of which instrument was the sackbut a forerunner? Trombone 2. Which Riviera fishing village was an independent republic from the 15th to the 17th century? 3. What are young grouse or partridge called? Cheepers 4. Who invented the steam turbine in 1884? Parson 5. What is your philtrum?
  10. @Canny lass, thank you so much....this is such a detailed and impressive set of information that’s saved me a chunk of digging! I wonder if Dr John wrote any memoirs? I think the murder would certainly feature. Thank you again. The Trotters were such an interesting and active family.
  11. Hi again, Heather, I had a look at various documents to see if I could find any son named John for Dr James Trotter. He does not appear to have had a son of this name from either of his marriages. Both wives were called Jane which complicated the matter. I believe John is a brother. John Erskine Mar Trotter, to give him his full title, appears as the five year younger brother of James Trotter, then aged 8, in the Scottish census of 1851. He is the youngest in the family. In 1861, when John EM. Is 11 yo, James has started studying medicine but is still living at home with his pa
  12. Time to give the grey matter an outing once again: 1. Of which instrument was the sackbut a forerunner? 2. Which Riviera fishing village was an independent republic from the 15th to the 17th century? 3. What are young grouse or partridge called? 4. Who invented the steam turbine in 1884? 5. What is your philtrum? 6. Arch, whorl and loops are all part of what? 7. Which fruit was discovered by Christopher Columbus in Guadeloupe in 1493? 8. Which spice is made from the outer covering of the nu
  13. That explains it! I thought it was a bit odd having ab Easter egg on display all year.
  14. Vegreville is predominately settled with Ukrainian immigrants, mainly farmers, and the pysanka being their traditional way of decorating Easter eggs, the area is well known for its heritage preservation, music, dancing, singing etc and like many other small towns they like to advertise their clams to fame by erecting a large symbol, which also happens to be a wind vane! Grande Cache has a Grande Cache!
  15. Tried it tonight and look what I got !!!!!!!! Thank you @Andy Millne
  16. Anther comment on the Bygone Bedlington group :- Sarah Cochrane My Mam worked as a domestic at the hall. While I was studying A level art she got permission for me to sit in one of the top rooms to draw the view. Whilst looking out at the amazing view from up there I got a birds eye view of patients having a sly cigarette or taking short cuts when they should have been walking full circuits around the hall after a while some grown men started sqealing and pointing to something. I didn't know what all the fuss was about until these said men burst through the door and int
  17. If you are interested in the changing face of Mental Health Care, Heather, have a look at the topic ‘John Stoker Letter’ posted in History Hollow by John H Williams in December last year. The topic concerns the dog breed Bedlington Terrier but a few posts in it goes off at a tangent related to the development of mental health diagnosis and treatment. This came about because the son of a Bedlington Vicar was 'committed' to the 'madhouse' taking with him a dog of this breed.
  18. It must have some relevance for the area if it's nothing to do with just Easter. Any idea what?
  19. Thank you, @Canny lass.....I think it’s likely ‘my’ doctor T was the son of the Bedlington one. There are some other local doctors in the story, as two of them gave evidence at Newcastle assizes that Annie Rath was unfit to plead. I’ll decide whether to follow those rabbit holes, when I decide how far to look at the treatment of mentally ill people in Northumberland and elsewhere at that time. Many of you will know that throughout the nineteenth century, attitudes became more and more enlightened - not really by modern standards, but certainly in comparison with what had gone before.
  20. It's permanent CL, nicely located in a park not too far from the highway making it a good rest area for travellers.
  21. Alan suggested that Dr James Trotter had a brother who lived in the Guidepost area. I hadn't heard that but I do know there were several doctors in the family. A short while ago I posted that I'd found, in the 1911 census, one of my relatives working for Dr Robert Samuel Trotter at Brewery house, Front Street Bedlington. I have to report that this wasn't THE Dr Trotter, as later resarch has shown. Dr Trotter of 'monument' fame died in 1899. However, both he(on the 1891 census) and Robert Samuel Trotter (on the 1911 census) lived at the same adress. I'm assuming therefore that the latter i
  22. It's unblocked at McAfee so there may be a local cache that needs updating on your computer. Try again in a few hours. To workaround you can whitelist the 31.193.136.176 IP
  23. Now, I'm not one for taking credit where credit isn't due BUT did you notice how Andy had fixed it within a few minutes of my advice/suggestion?
  24. Feels like most times these days - must get out for some fresh air and twiddle. Switching subjects, again, but sticking to cerebrally challenged, my mind keeps telling me that I read somewhere (and I can't find that writing 😲) that our Dr trotter had a brother (also a doc?) that lived near Scotland Gate. But I could just be challenging myself and desperate to help Heather W. Gone for a lie down and a cuppa.
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