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  1. Today
  2. HIGH PIT WILMA

    Coal Mining

    Hi alan,aav been on the last hoor,reading an article in the Durham mining museum....ye'd think aa had written it!!..except for one variation on the description of the controls on a coalcutter. They say that the speed handle is raised for high speed..["Flitting" the cutter]...and dropped down for slow speed..["Cutting" speed]. AAL thi machines aa ever worked on,ye dropped the handle down and pulled it out past a detent,then dropped it further..that put the machine inti FLIT MODE.[OR.....to run the rope on or off the haulage drum at a higher speed than that used for cutting.] A think it's a slight mistake on the drawings,cos an AB 15 OR AM 16[LATER YEARS]..were aal the same. Check it out..it's a really gud article!
  3. Yesterday
  4. HIGH PIT WILMA

    Coal Mining

    Alan,hae yi checked oot anywhere ti see if thi pit dictionaries mention the Gummers?...a once saw one come adrift from the latches when we were cutting the face and it fell inti thi picks...wat a mangled mess it was..solid steel casings ripped like a piece of old rag ...seeing that made me respect this machine's power even more!...many a time a saw lads who were at the jib,scuffling wi a big filler's shuul,as we were jibbing in ready ti cut thi face,and they wud get a wee bit too close ti thi picks...and the shuul wud be snatched oot their hands and taken up inside the cut by the back picks,only ti be thrown oot a tangled mess wi nea resemblance to the shuul that was!
  5. HIGH PIT WILMA

    Coal Mining

    Heh heh! The power of the net again! ....bringing auld pit marra's tigitha again! Thanks Alan,please pass my regards ti Geoff,haven't seen Geoff for a canny few years...last time was when he was at the Chapel at the Half Moon,Stakeford,and he was in the chapel with the organisers of the Russian[?] Butter Mountain distribution team,handing out the free ration of butter to the old and needy folks in the community,and I was seeking the rations for the old neighbours of mine at that time.It might have been in the '80's...I can't remember exactly,but Geoff probably does.When Geoff came to the Aad Pit at Bedlington,from Hauxley Pit,He described the conditions there,and I can vividly remember him being met with scorn from the Aad Pit old-timers,who hadn't seen water get owa the bootlaces...and the reason I remember it well,was because me and my Marra's from Choppington High Pit had met with the same scorn just before Geoff came..so Geoff and me exchanged stories of how rough our pits were!! "SCORN"= Comments such as....."oh Aye ....heor wi gaan.....wiv hord it aal before...clivvor bugga's...working in three foot o' waata..in a two-foot seam..."...said very sarcastically,from a gathering of the aad pit coalfillers....in answer to THEIR question as "was Choppington as rough as this then?"...as we rested for five minutes on the way inbye..sitting on a wood chock,wi wa byeuts pressed into stone dust four inches deep....the dust was a killer mind,even waaking inbye ye were choking on it in the High MAIN seam. We just telt them it was a thoosand times rougher at Choppington,cos A] The water teemed in from the roof,there were very few pumps,the water just filled long swalleys,until it overflowed and ran down the inclined roadways ti fill the next swalley...and so on.....! Some swalley's were 50-100 yards long,and up to your waist...we transport lads travelled through up to a dozen times a shift,in the different roadways in the pit. B] Because the seam went doon ti less than two feet high,the cuttermen had ti cut thi bottom oot,throughout the face ti mek height for the cutter ti pass through..so ye had airborne dust filling the roadways alang wi roof droppers of waata and ground water aal tigitha...! C] The Shaft was sunk through sandbanks and musselbeds[fossilised!],and the whole of the seams were driven through nests of geological faults...["Faaalts"..!]..making roof and sides very difficult to control...men got killed or injured every other few weeks and my Father told me it was like that in 1929 when he was a young putter down there!!..[as you know...aged 14 years!]...and the changes for the better came only with rails laid in the Mothergates as well as the Tailgates,when the new Drift doon ti thi Top Busty opened up not lang afore thi pit closed...the waata and bad roof conditions remained the same as the other seams!! A wonder if Geoff cud relate sum stories from his time doon thi black hole!!A wud luv ti hear from him on wor site,cos aam not on Facebook. Thanks for posting his pics Alan,he's nivvor changed..just a bit mair matured in the oak..so ti speak!
  6. Bot

    Fundraiser in appeal for book support

    A Bedlington fundraiser is aiming to help people with sight loss.
  7. rosco

    Contractor chosen for major scheme

    Pleased its going ahead but i'm worried about the calibre of shops that will be opened as we don,t need any more cafes,takeaways,hairdressers,barber shops,tattoo parlours,beauty salons,nail bars & mini marts Aldi are the big food retailer fair enough.....but who else is going to take up the rest of the shops,we keep hearing about well known high street retailers coming to bedlington but cant for the life of me think who would come here.Knowing our luck the big names will be a Costa Coffee & Clinton's cards instead of butchers bakers & candlestick maker (yeh i know) We've lived here since early 90s https://www.bedlington.co.uk/forums/topic/6015-closed-shops/?tab=comments#comment-60802 Sadly out of town/internet shopping has cause the decline and it will be very hard to get back,but we don't want /need anymore shops I've mentioned above.Iceland would be good,Wilkinson's would be good but that still leaves an awful lot of small shops to fill.....If only the council had pulled its finger out and approved the Tesco redevelopment when it had the chance rather than fanny on for years
  8. Last week
  9. Bot

    Contractor chosen for major scheme

    A key Bedlington town centre development has reached an important milestone as Tolent Construction Ltd has been appointed the main contractor.
  10. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1938c named.jpg

    Just like buses, two turn up at once. Found this one, also Bygone Bedlington group, from Mary Mclean, who found it among her dads collection but doesn't have any info. Another member of the group, Sheila Parr , posted :- Netherton 1937 38 football team the best ever winning 3 trophies in that season sorry no names 😊
  11. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1938c named.jpg

    Netherton FC c1938 - photo from Mel Morpeth, Facebook Bygone Bedlington group. Two players identified by George Railton who commented :- George Railton The guy first left of the cup holder was my Uncle ,John Railton ,he went on to play for Glentoran in the Irish premier league and was then offered a contract by West Ham but turned it down. George Railton The guy far bottom right in the overcoat with the upturned collar was my Dad Isaac Railton. He also played for Netherton and Bedlington United and always that he was a better footballer than my Uncle John!!
  12. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    Netherton/Nedderton old photos 2

    All photos shared by members that have posted these photos on Facebook sites - Bedlington Remembered, Bygone Bedlington & Sixtownships
  13. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1964Netherton at CISWO Finals Blackpool.jpg

    From the list of names that accompanied the photo some have been identified in the photo
  14. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1950sNethertonBand(locationanddateunknown).jpg

    Facebook Bygone Bedlington members - Ray Lee (No 13) - George Railton (No 21) & Joe Grant (No 5) have identified the majority so I have linked the names to the faces, via numbers.
  15. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    Coal Mining

    That's the one HPW - I posted your reply on the Barrington Facebook site and Geoff replied - 'Oh right - yes I remember him Say hello to him for me please'
  16. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    Coal Mining

    If I leave this world tomorrow I will be go contented knowing my life had been enhanced by the Rolley-Way man Scuffling alang wi the Worm & fling Gummer = magic HPW
  17. HIGH PIT WILMA

    Coal Mining

    Just as an afterthought,and before I stand corrected...[!]....on a face which was prone to "Laying -on",the cutterman following behind the machine,that is where the cutter has just passed,would push a prop under the cut so far,and wedge it up by inserting another prop crossways-on underneath the first one,and in doing so,would serve to support the coal seam,and prevent the jib becoming fast. At Choppington High Pit,we called these "Judd-Stays"....and don't ask me why!..it was just a term carried on through generations of cuttermen and coalfillers at the pit.I never heard that term used anywhere else at any other pit. These stays were placed under the cut at intervals throughout the face ..usually a few yards apart,or wherever the cutterman's marra ahent the machine thowt it was nessissarry....... Cheers!
  18. HIGH PIT WILMA

    Coal Mining

    Hi Canny Lass,and ye'all! Alan Dixon's right aboot thi Rolleywayman.He had he's cabin at or near the shaft bottom area,where he kept his gear.His main duties were ti maintain the rolleyway..[Railtracks] ...in good order,which was a doddle at dry pits like Bedlington A pit...[the Aad pit],where the sleepers weren't subjected to rot,and the nails and dogs kept the rails tight . If ye cudda been doon Choppington High Pit,or Bates 3/4 seam,or Hauxley,where Geoff Glass came from..[assuming it's the Geoff that came ti thi Aad pit when Hauxley pit closed..],and ye saw 40 or 50 yards..[or more!],of rolleyway....floating just under the water,where the water cud be three feet [or more!] deep.....then that became a nightmare for the set-lads who had ti travel in with long sets of materials /girders/machinery ..etc....when the "Way" just collapsed and the rails parted company from the sleepers!! This isn't summik that's ivvor mentioned in books aboot mining by so-called experts....nae disrespect to anybody...it's just that pitmen like Geoff,and Mesell',who came from really wet pits, had ti contend wi these conditions ivry day. Choppington High Pit had nae rails in the Mothergates,only in the Tailgates,so we had to trail everything inbye on the rough-shot stony ground,and the Rolleywayman had nae work ti dae in them roadways!! "Scuffling" was , as Alan Dixon says, cleaning oot the undercut coal in order ti provide for better "Shots",when the seam was drilled and fired .[Edit...not primarily though!!see notes further down!!] The only time in recent years after the war,that a "Scuffler" was needed ti follow the Coalcutter up thi face was if the Cutterman didn't fix a "Gummer" ti thi front-end [Cutting-end] of the cutter...this cud be cos the Gummer was lost in the goaf,or THROWN into thi goaf after cummin adrift from the cutter and gettin chowed up wi the picks on thi cutter jib...which happened!! The Gummer's other name was a "Scuffling Bucket",and there were two types. 1] The Worm Gummer 2] The Fling Gummer The first one was so-named cos it had a large "Worm" shaped blade rotating on a shaft, which was driven by a "Dog"gear system,on the cutting -end,and which was encased in a "Bucket-shaped" housing.The gummer was "hung" onto the cutting end and held by two latches.During cutting operations,the Gummer/worm collected the small coal scufflings,which the cutter picks brought out from the cut, ..["Duff"],and deposited them in a neat continuous heap behind the cutter in the cutting track.The undercut coal was relatively clean,but not perfect!! ..[Each coalfiller had to "Duff" his own "Stretch..or "Stint",by shovelling all thi duff onto the conveyor belt before firing his shots so people could travel the face.] The second one was equally hung onto the same latching points as the first one,but the orientation of the scuffling cycle was totally different!..The "Fling" Gummer was so-named cos it had a heavy-duty!!..set of three blades ,again housed in a really heavy casing,and again,driven by the same gear "Dog",only this was designed to collect the scufflings from the cutting jib,and literally "fling"them over the face conveyor belt and into the goaf..[waste area where coal has previously been extracted].This was the best system,cos the fillers had very little duff to clean up before starting to fire and fill off the coal. I must add that the intention of "Scuffling " the cut,wasn't primarily to give the coalfillers better shots,[though it was a bonus when the cut was clean!],it was to prevent the the coalcutter jib from becoming "Fast"..["Stuck"],in the cut,and potentially throwing the cutter out and making it dance around. The AB15 coalcutter weighed three and a half ton,and was nine feet long,two feet wide,and fifteen inches high,and with a six-feet long cutting jib attached,was the most viscious machine ever invented by man,grossly overpowered and underweighted. You had to see a cutter with the picks running, dancing wildly under a low coal face....18 to 20 inches high,or even in a 36 inch- high face, knocking timbers out,picks flying around,throwing the whole machine around,crazily, as if it was made out of balsa wood..trapping a coalcutterman up against a steel Desford chock...[the earliest ones made]...nearly killing the man,to appreciate and respect how viscious these machines were. It only took a bit of "Brass"..[Pyrites],under the cut to catch the picks and Hoy the cutter oot the cut....so the job of hand scuffling behind the machine, was not only hard work,it was also really dangerous,only those who have never seen a machine dancing around,would be complacent enough to get too close to the cutter when it was on "Full-ratch"!...[Fullspeed]. Accidents to one side,the dread of the cutterman was when the face started laying on,[or "Weighting on..],and the roof starts to lower in front of your eyes,the danger here is of the cutter jib becoming "Fast as a kna..er!"....nipped tight by the weight of the lowering seam closing the cut and rendering further cutting advance to a standstill.When this happened we had to drill holes around the jib area,put a wee bit Pooda..[explosives] into the holes,and fire them,so as to release the cutting jib and commence cutting. Aye,it wasn't aal plain sailing was it Alan [or Geoff]! Canny Lass,a hope me lang draan oot explinashin has helped yi oot wi yor qwestyins! Sorry a didn't respond straight away,aav had a lot of stress at yem,and just got back inti thi fold!!
  19. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1956 named.jpg

    Photo and names from George Railton (No 12) - Facebook Bygone Bedlington group.
  20. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    West End Junior school - Ridge Terrace

    Often referred to as the 'Council School'. Entry in https://communities.northumberland.gov.uk/005616.htm has the date c1916
  21. Earlier
  22. Northumberland Libraries is encouraging residents to make the most of the internet as part of national Get Online Week from October 15 - October 21.
  23. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1972c from Tracy Oakley named.jpg

    @Michelle Tyler - posted the updated photo on the Bygone Bedlington facebook group and No 7 updated to Malcolm Brown & No 23 to Wendy Newton (maiden name)
  24. Ovalteeny

    Netherton Football team photo - 1937-38?

    Slightly off subject, but when I was searching through The Morpeth Herald for a snooker query I came across the attached snippet regards an annual Good Friday Charity football match in Netherton. Proceeds to the Children's Gala. Netherton Hall Pit Old Boys versus Howard Pit Old Boys. Some of the name may help identify those in the photo above.
  25. Alan Edgar (Eggy1948)

    1972c from Tracy Oakley named.jpg

    Last 4 names added @Michelle Tyler
  26. Michelle Tyler

    1972c from Tracy Oakley named.jpg

    1 Gavin Latimer 2 Derek Hibbet 16 Sharon Hodgetts and Im 24 Michelle Tyler
  27. Ovalteeny

    Netherton Football team photo - 1937-38?

    The research I did last winter looking at football in Bedlingtonshire after World War 2 showed that a team from Netherton Colliery played in The Miners Welfare League for 4 seasons from 1948/49. They also had a Reserve Team that played in the Ashington Welfare League for one season only in 1948/49. The names of the players that I managed to get from the Morpeth Herald and/or Blyth News are in one of the jpegs below. It just might be that some of the Netherton lads from before the War were still playing after the War The other jpeg shows all the teams that I could find that were playing for the 5 or 6 years after the War. Most of the teams did pay the players (as part-timers), so it wasn't uncommon for the better players to play for a different club (colliery/village) if the money was considered better. Players could also sign and play for more than one club, provided they were in different leagues.
  28. A North East MP has demanded the "immediate scrapping" of controversial benefit Universal Credit. The system will worsen child poverty, increase homelessness and even lead to people taking their own lives, Wansbeck MP Ian Lavery has claimed. Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown warned the country could face "chaos" similar to the poll tax riots if the national roll out continues, in the Daily Mirror today, He branded the welfare reforms a "cruel and vindictive" experiment that will exacerbate the "convulsions" of Brexit and risk public disorder. The Government says the reforms ensure working is worthwhile for claimants and simplifies the benefits system. But opponents believe it leaves claimants worse-off, and creates delays which leave people waiting for much-needed cash. Now, Labour Party Chair Ian Lavery has called for an end to Universal Credit, predicting dire consequences for Northumberland if the roll out goes head.
  29. Bot

    Works completed at Old School site

    A residential site development offering new, high-quality homes for affordable rent in Bedlington has been completed.
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